Sunsphere tenant facing eviction

Company seeks financial relief from city to pay rent

The owner of a catering company located in Knoxville’s landmark Sunsphere, seen here, is seeking financial assistance from the city to continue his business. The company, Southern Graces LLC, is facing eviction unless it can come up with additional funds to pay rent.

Photo by Paul Efird

The owner of a catering company located in Knoxville’s landmark Sunsphere, seen here, is seeking financial assistance from the city to continue his business. The company, Southern Graces LLC, is facing eviction unless it can come up with additional funds to pay rent.

A company that provides catering in Knoxville's landmark Sunsphere is facing eviction unless it can come up additional funds to pay rent.

Bob Sukenik, owner of Southern Graces LLC, is seeking financial assistance from the city to continue his business, which he said took a financial hit because of investments he made in the space that his landlords didn't.

"There isn't a problem with the business. The rent is unsustainable and the debt load is too heavy," Sukenik said. "We need relief. We could make it work if we got relief. Short of that there's no way of stopping the train."

Sukenik subleases two of the largest floors within the Sunsphere, where he operates a bar and event venue, from developers Cardinal Enterprises and Chattanooga-based Kinsey Probasco Hays & Associates. They both dispute Sukenik's claims.

Sukenik said his landlords have pushed him out of business by failing to live up to their commitment to the city by not making necessary investments to the Sunsphere in exchange for low rent.

Cardinal and KPH have a 20-year lease with the city that calls for $36,000 annually in rent plus nearly $28,000 annually toward utilities.

Sukenik said his rent is $10,500 monthly and that he invested between $175,000-$200,000 in improvements. He also said he lost about $140,000 in revenue because the bar's opening was delayed a year.

"Our failure was designed by KPH and Cardinal. Had they not left us to fulfill their obligation to the city, we would be fine," Sukenik said. "It sunk us. We could not sustain the debt."

Southern Graces filed for bankruptcy last April.

Knoxville developer Brian Conley of Cardinal and Jon Kinsey said there is no truth to Sukenik's accusations.

"It's unfortunate that he wasn't able to make it work and he's trying to blame people. We lived up to our obligation. He chose to do more than perhaps he needed to," Kinsey said.

Cardinal and KPH voluntarily gave Sukenik more lenient terms when they restructured his lease in March, but Kinsey said he has not been able to pay.

Sukenik has appealed to the city, which he said has been "unwilling to help."

Bill Lyons, senior director of policy and communications for the city of Knoxville, said the dispute is between KPH and their subcontractor.

"While we would very much like the dispute to be resolved, any disagreements are between those two parties," Lyons said.

When asked why he agreed to invest his own money into the space, Sukenik replied "I felt we had to. If we hadn't continued to finish it, my business is done. I already had clients in the pipeline. I think they knew that and played on it."

Sukenik said his goal is to keep the business going. He doesn't want people to think it went out of business because they weren't doing a good job. Skybox remains open and about 40 events have already booked for the summer.

"I've taken a beating on this for three years. I've used everything I have to make it work. I've got nothing to lose," Sukenik said.

Business writer Carly Harrington may be reached at 865-342-6317.

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Comments » 64

liblaw writes:

"There isn't a problem with the business. The rent is unsustainable and the debt load is too heavy"

Those two statements can't be reconciled. Unsustainable rent and heavy debt load count as a problems with the business.

PepperGrinder (Inactive) writes:

I hope they can work something out. I kind of like the bar in the Sunsphere.

Ratchet writes:

If they didn't charge way too much for thier drinks more people would be inclined to go there. I mean, why would I spend my $ there if I want a beer downtown? Let's see, $5 for a crappy beer in the Sunsphere or $3 for a microbrew at Downtown Grill and Brewery? I know where I'm spending my money.

joseph_mccarthy writes:

I didn't even know there WAS a business in the Sunsphere...perhaps a bit of advertising might have saved the place.

pbeeson writes:

in response to Ratchet:

If they didn't charge way too much for thier drinks more people would be inclined to go there. I mean, why would I spend my $ there if I want a beer downtown? Let's see, $5 for a crappy beer in the Sunsphere or $3 for a microbrew at Downtown Grill and Brewery? I know where I'm spending my money.

This is a great point, and the reason I won't go back to the Sunsphere bar.

ThatGuy1 writes:

there's a bar in the sunsphere? people go to the sunsphere? i thought it was just a wig store.

Cracker writes:

It's an eyesore. A very distinctive eyesore, in the middle of very large and unsightly stretch of concrete.

Foggy writes:

Why am I not surprised to see Cardinal Enterprises is involved in this? Granted, the business owner should have known his two business models weren't right for the Sunsphere but I would almost bet my savings that Cardinal lied over and over again to this business owner just to get him there. Then, he setup shop, waited for Cardinal to come through on their end and got nothing.

Ask any former Cardinal customer - commercial or residential - how many times they were lied to and I doubt they'll be able to count all of the instances.

jmgroper#472786 writes:

Another taxpayer bailout coming?

cjensen writes:

TopCider...
"But one thing: what would the downtown area have looked like had the last three decades been handled differently? The Wests might not be in jail, the Bijou might still be a porn shop, Jake Butcher might still be in business, the O'Sullivan saloon building might have been torn down."
-----------------------
Ah, very good question indeed, where would downtown Knoxville have been without city and state investment. I'll tell you...a ghost town.

Granted, it's never lived up to it's potential, but to fault public support for trying to save/improve downtown as Cider and Road has done, is short-sighted, particularly when they offer no alternatives but to let it rot.

An individual and business protects its assets by investing in and improving that asset. Knoxville, Knox County and Tennessee has done the same with downtown Knoxville.

To indict all such programs, as Road has done, simply because Knoxville has not been as successful as we would like, is being blinded by personal bias against all things government.

But for massive government spending, Chattanooga would still be a filthy little hole by the river, Atlanta underground would not exist, the Baltimore inner harbor would just be a bunch of old warehouses.

All of these destination projects that were nothing but a vision, were backed, pushed and funded by government. When they became unqualified successes, they were turned over to private enterprise to set up restaurants, bars, gift and souvenir shops, so that private enterprise could make a profit.

Without government seeding and support, none of these would exist, and that is where Road's rant against all things government fails, and fails miserable.

Going into any project, be it public or private, there is no assurance of success. It is a gamble and that gamble must be taken by government and private enterprise, in order for us to improve our community and country. But invariably, government leads the way. If Roads and Cider had their way, we would be stuck in yesterday, forever.

thedude writes:

in response to Ratchet:

If they didn't charge way too much for thier drinks more people would be inclined to go there. I mean, why would I spend my $ there if I want a beer downtown? Let's see, $5 for a crappy beer in the Sunsphere or $3 for a microbrew at Downtown Grill and Brewery? I know where I'm spending my money.

I think they've lowered prices since first opening. I had the same reaction as you the first time I went, but I went back a couple months later and found the prices to be lower than I had remembered. Now the prices are roughly what you'd find in other bars ($3 for bluemoon if memory serves) and the bartenders aren't stingy with their pours.

hallsguy writes:

Supposedly there is some office space being used in the Sunsphere.
The convention center falls into the too big to fail category,but if they tied the sunsphere to the convention center and hired Southern Graces to be the caterer and another party space that would maybe add something to the convention center.Not that there is much we can do about or for the CC.
The convention center was a white elephant from the get go.So what is happening with the Holiday Inn now that it is sold? Doesn't appear to be much.
As to Foggy's comments about Cardinal,I have heard the same many times.

UTXC writes:

in response to thedude:

I think they've lowered prices since first opening. I had the same reaction as you the first time I went, but I went back a couple months later and found the prices to be lower than I had remembered. Now the prices are roughly what you'd find in other bars ($3 for bluemoon if memory serves) and the bartenders aren't stingy with their pours.

I agree 100% with "thedude". Go there and order a Whiskey on the rocks and you won't be dissappointed with the pour. Same goes for their wine.

Also, you can get a Sierra Nevada for $3 and Guiness for $4 (used to be $3). That is equal to, or less than what you can expect anywhere else. I love the bar up there. I hope it can stay open.

*Note* The Brewery is great too. A great compliment to downtown Knoxville.

dbdbdo writes:

in response to ThatGuy1:

there's a bar in the sunsphere? people go to the sunsphere? i thought it was just a wig store.

Actually the wig store was down below,they just stored wigs in the sunsphere.

UT37916 writes:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

lemmy999#283948 writes:

Microbrews aren't always better.

An_Honest_Abe writes:

in response to ROAD_FOREMAN_OF_ENGINES:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Economic Development is an ongoing challenge for many communities, Knoxville is no different. The Worlds Fair Property, along with the Convention Center play an integral role in our ability to sell Knoxville as a place to hold a successful meeting, conference or fundraiser. This weekend we have 15,000 of America's brightest, creative young minds in our hometown. The economic impact for this weekends event has been estimated to be $24M. I can't think of a better use of our convention center. It doesn't end there...nearly every weekend during the spring and summer the greenspace at WFP is used by a local group for small festivals, many of which are free. On the 4th of July perhaps you and your family would enjoy the symphony and a great fireworks show on the lawn at WFP for a nominal fee. Look at Gay Street and Market Square...our downtown area is heading in a positive direction. That helps us sell our city and attract more tax revenue easing the burdon on us.

If we didn't have WFP or the Convention Center we would not be able to host the meetings, conventions and fundraisers that we do today. That would bring far less folks through our community and far less tax dollars into our budgets. Several area hotels and restaurants count on this revenue to keep their businesses operating.

Pass on the news...good things are happening in Knoxville. If you don't think so, visit the convention center today and see the energy from all those bright young minds, eat lunch at Market Square and take a walk around Worlds Fair Park. You will have a great day.

Pickle_Parks writes:

in response to ThatGuy1:

there's a bar in the sunsphere? people go to the sunsphere? i thought it was just a wig store.

I thought the place was called "The wigsphere."

What's all this sunsphere stuff?

LocalGirl writes:

Wow, KPH/Cardinal pays the City of Knoxville $36,000 a YEAR, but Southern Graces rent is $10,500 a MONTH!!
How about Knoxville has someone already on staff oversee the management of the Sunsphere. Maybe give them a yearly bonus of 1-8% of whatever rent revenue is brought into the sunsphere. That way Knoxville would make the $126,000 a year off of Southern Graces, plus whatever other business's could be drawn to set up shop there.

In the three years Southern Graces has been there, they have paid $378,000. The city of Knoxville is charging KPH/Cardinal only $720,000 rent, plus $560,000 for ultilities and giving them 20 years to pay it. I'm not saying KPH/Cardinal doesn't have a right to make money on the space, but how hard did the city of Knoxville try to lure tenants on their own? Be smart people!!

alwayscensored writes:

A business either has to pay rent or they will be evicted? This is news? Sounds like a personal problem. Find somewhere with less overhead - something you should have done from the start.

gross1157 writes:

Wow,I thought the rent was out of control in Turkey Creek,KPH/Cardinals gravy train is about to end in a greedy sort of way.Just look at the center known as 5710 Kingston Pike to see what pricing yourself out of market will do.It's a ghost town save for a nail shop and an adult toy store.I can't blame the KPH/Cardinal people for striking a great lease deal with the city,but get real and drop the greed and price your lease in a way that a business has aleast some chance to make it.

Vols300 writes:

Can we not sell it to BP and cap that dang well in the Gulf, if not can we sell it to Dollywood lay it on it's side and call it the Tunnel of Love. If none of that works can we turn it on it's other end aim it towards North Carolina and catapault local politicians, and developers about four countys over!

brokebackvol writes:

in response to stinkysmurf13#523279:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

You are right, those cities DID do the things needed for revitalization. However (and I've complained about this for years) Knoxpatch is still depending on the "tourist" money from UT Sporting events. Knoxville IS NOT A TOURIST DESTINATION! There is no aquarium, there is no artists colony, and proximity to the Smokies? Please!

I'd like to see some reporting on the comparisons of Chattanooga and Asheville - they are about the same size, but what they did right, and what Knoxville hasn't, would be eye-opening.

I blame the conservative "tradition" politics that are unwilling to take any risks, and the climate for non-residents has been quite anti-anything that isn't "family values."

UTXC writes:

in response to JFET:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

I can see why a Lager would be wanted. I haven't ever thought about it but I guess they never have carried one (and it is odd they don't have many bottled).

In most cases (obviously my opinion), Ales rule in flavor and complexity. My least favorite beers at the Smokey Mountain Brewery (besides their Wheat which is always my least favorite beer type) are their Thunder Road (Pilsener) and Vellas Helles (Lager).

I would, however, like to see the Brewmasters at the Brewery tackle a Pilsner or Lager to see what they could come up with.

To say that the Brewery is a "low quality joint" is unfair at best. I'd love to hear the Brewmaster's answer on why they don't carry Lagers.

cjensen writes:

Str82...
"nice stump for your government god cjensen, but put your idol down for a minute and you might see the government is nothing more than a pool for collecting money from people who actually work and generate income."
------------------------------
Well, you are exactly right....government is a pooling of money from people...to build roads, police the city, run the courts, do research, set standards and regulations, monitor food and drug safety (if not very well), build bridges, perform housing inspection, set building codes.

If you had to go to private entities for these services, it would cost your 2 or 3 times what you pay in taxes.

Now, for the record, I don't idolize government, and some government, such as our current County government, I hold in high disrespect.

However, I am not a bias-blinded ideological fool and can very well see the usefulness and importance of government if our daily lives. But for government, which is we, the people, daily life would grind to a halt.

The hoo-hoots hate government and want to pay no taxes, yet they enjoy the benefits of government every day, but blindly refuses to recognize and acknowledge it. I'm simply pointing that out to you.

utgradstudent (Inactive) writes:

in response to Ratchet:

If they didn't charge way too much for thier drinks more people would be inclined to go there. I mean, why would I spend my $ there if I want a beer downtown? Let's see, $5 for a crappy beer in the Sunsphere or $3 for a microbrew at Downtown Grill and Brewery? I know where I'm spending my money.

I went a few weeks ago, and the beers were either 3 or 2 dollars. That is the same price or even cheaper than your precious microbrew.

dweezil13 writes:

"Cardinal and KPH have a 20-year lease with the city that calls for $36,000 annually in rent plus nearly $28,000 annually toward utilities.

Sukenik said his rent is $10,500 monthly"

WOW!What a deal for Cardinal and KPH!

ne1sguess writes:

What is everyone so worried about? As soon as we see all the economic growth resulting from that trip to Kosovo everything will be just fine.

ReasonableOne writes:

Ahhh, A new business model. As long as there is cash flow, then the business is viable as long as rent and debt service are not too high....good luck with that!

JS4UT writes:

If, after thirty years, the City leaders have been unable (or unwilling) to figure out what to do with the World's Fair site, what makes anyone think they can revitalize anything (that doesn't put money in their own pockets, of course?) Knoxville's downtown area is a dead horse that some people insist can be brought back to life...sorry, that's not going to happen. There's not been one single intelligent idea put forth for that entire area that's actually been followed through on...downtown is a dump, it's always going to be a dump, and the sooner taxpayers realize it the better off we'll all be.

ThatGuy1 writes:

in response to dbdbdo:

Actually the wig store was down below,they just stored wigs in the sunsphere.

you're correct, my mistake. just don't set the cruise control if you're heading for a visit.

ReasonableOne writes:

Hey this guy is just trying to follow the business plan used for the Regal Cinema Downtown. Just get the city to exempt you from taxes and pick up the tab for 2/3 of your capital investment. Then claim success when your cash flow covers your operating cost and limited capital expense. And Oh yes, structure it so that if it goes south, no other venture's revenue from the site can be used to pay the bond holders to insure that you'll get the real estate, when the tax payers took the bulk of the risk. Hey, it's worked before!

ThatGuy1 writes:

as for revitalizing downtown - relocating the Smokies to kodak hurt.

scruffylookingnerfherder writes:

in response to UTXC:

I can see why a Lager would be wanted. I haven't ever thought about it but I guess they never have carried one (and it is odd they don't have many bottled).

In most cases (obviously my opinion), Ales rule in flavor and complexity. My least favorite beers at the Smokey Mountain Brewery (besides their Wheat which is always my least favorite beer type) are their Thunder Road (Pilsener) and Vellas Helles (Lager).

I would, however, like to see the Brewmasters at the Brewery tackle a Pilsner or Lager to see what they could come up with.

To say that the Brewery is a "low quality joint" is unfair at best. I'd love to hear the Brewmaster's answer on why they don't carry Lagers.

Am I the only one who gets deathly sick the next morning after just one or two of those brewery beers? I've chugged my share of beer in my day and then some, I know what my limits are and what a hangover feels like. But everytime I go to the brewery I say to myself the last brutal headache I got must've been a fluke, there can't be anything wrong with this beer. And I end up layed up in bed the next morning with the worst ever headache from drinking fewer than 3 beers. It only happens when I drink their beer, and it's happened enough times that I just avoid that place.

Urban_jj writes:

in response to JS4UT:

If, after thirty years, the City leaders have been unable (or unwilling) to figure out what to do with the World's Fair site, what makes anyone think they can revitalize anything (that doesn't put money in their own pockets, of course?) Knoxville's downtown area is a dead horse that some people insist can be brought back to life...sorry, that's not going to happen. There's not been one single intelligent idea put forth for that entire area that's actually been followed through on...downtown is a dump, it's always going to be a dump, and the sooner taxpayers realize it the better off we'll all be.

Hmm, I can smell a Turkey Creek business owner a mile off. Sorry, pal, too late. Downtown has already come back to life--I'm sorry you missed the memo. But Road_Foreman is having a club meeting for those who hate Knoxville--you might want to attend.

cjensen writes:

Cider, your progressive approach is spot on. Road's post wasn't really a rant, as much as a rote recitation of 'government is bad, private enterprise is good'. There's some people in LA right now, that might take exception to that. In fact, they are begging the government to come in and save them from the private profiteers.

The only business that seems to thrive in dwntwn Knoxburgh is hookering. Government and private enterprise could learn some lessons on what sells.

hallsguy writes:

Why does Knoxville want to be a tourist destination? Why should we compete with the Smokies/Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge?
Knoxville needs to find something to identify with and do it better than everybody else.That is what brings the people in.
Market Square is doing great without any national chains other than the Marble Slab.Gay St. is coming along.People are downtown.
Chattanooga was supported by local deep pocketed families that were willing to put the money up where it counted.But where Chattanooga got the national chains in,Warehouse Row, they failed.Chattanooga is not doing all that well.
Asheville was also backed by local civic benefactors.There are a lot of local businesses downtown.
My hypothesis is that you develop organically with home grown businesses that are nowhere else and people will come to see uniqueness. Every town of any size has a convention center.But,But,But,the convention business is down,down down.
If Knoxville jumps on the bandwagon of everybody else is doing it we are destined to fail.
Dare to do something different,usually you get better results.

Urban_jj writes:

in response to hallsguy:

Why does Knoxville want to be a tourist destination? Why should we compete with the Smokies/Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge?
Knoxville needs to find something to identify with and do it better than everybody else.That is what brings the people in.
Market Square is doing great without any national chains other than the Marble Slab.Gay St. is coming along.People are downtown.
Chattanooga was supported by local deep pocketed families that were willing to put the money up where it counted.But where Chattanooga got the national chains in,Warehouse Row, they failed.Chattanooga is not doing all that well.
Asheville was also backed by local civic benefactors.There are a lot of local businesses downtown.
My hypothesis is that you develop organically with home grown businesses that are nowhere else and people will come to see uniqueness. Every town of any size has a convention center.But,But,But,the convention business is down,down down.
If Knoxville jumps on the bandwagon of everybody else is doing it we are destined to fail.
Dare to do something different,usually you get better results.

I agree. It's like a kid at an Easter egg hunt--if you follow other kids around, you'll never find anything. Contrived attractions can be successful, but you have to be first, and you have to be right.

My premise (and I've heard this from others) is that our "attraction" is here right now, growing organically all the time--the business surrounding our music business. What two events in Knoxville were covered in national media like the NY Times and the LA Times? The TVUUC church shooting and BIG EARS. Of the two, I know which one I'd rather get behind. The big tent music scene (roots music to rock to opera and everything in between) is not a single admission attraction like a planetarium or an aquarium. But it is based on our strong local music assets (and some imaginative people) in a revitalized environment that has not sold out our past. And it supports other peripheral businesses automatically.

UTXC writes:

in response to JFET:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Ha. Very admirable post (not being sarcastic)! If I was in your situation, I would avoid them as well. Choosing between Budweiser and a stomach ache is a lose-lose situation.

You should write to the Brewery and see if they can develop a Lager. I would love to see what they come up with!

dweezil13 writes:

in response to cjensen:

Cider, your progressive approach is spot on. Road's post wasn't really a rant, as much as a rote recitation of 'government is bad, private enterprise is good'. There's some people in LA right now, that might take exception to that. In fact, they are begging the government to come in and save them from the private profiteers.

The only business that seems to thrive in dwntwn Knoxburgh is hookering. Government and private enterprise could learn some lessons on what sells.

And you know this...because?
Is there something Mrs.Jensen doesn't know?

gross1157 writes:

The Sunsphere would have been the more perfect place to have housed the Women's basketball hall of fame.It's already in the shape of a basketball and more have a real unique place to have put it.Just a spilled milk thought..

UTXC writes:

in response to scruffylookingnerfherder:

Am I the only one who gets deathly sick the next morning after just one or two of those brewery beers? I've chugged my share of beer in my day and then some, I know what my limits are and what a hangover feels like. But everytime I go to the brewery I say to myself the last brutal headache I got must've been a fluke, there can't be anything wrong with this beer. And I end up layed up in bed the next morning with the worst ever headache from drinking fewer than 3 beers. It only happens when I drink their beer, and it's happened enough times that I just avoid that place.

Surprisingly, that is a pretty common theme among their beers (specifically their IPA). I used to have the same thing happen to me but now I try to throw back as much water as I do beer and it tends to work out well.

pbeeson writes:

in response to JFET:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

It's not because they can't make a lager, it's probably because it's not financially smart to do so.

Lagers eat up space for both fermenters and bright tanks. Most take a couple weeks for maturation versus days for ales.

I enjoy a pilsner or bock as much as the next craft-beer lover, but I also understand they're trying to run a business.

pbeeson writes:

in response to lemmy999#283948:

Microbrews aren't always better.

That's true. A bad beer is a bad beer. But I try to drink beers brewed locally whenever possible.

Of course, I'm a homebrewer and that's my first choice always.

pbeeson writes:

in response to JFET:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

You may want to consider the fact that Budweiser is less "beer" than anything Woodruff's makes.

I guess the chemicals make it go down easier. :)

dwillis#506608 writes:

in response to BTJustise:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Different, grunt, bad. Don't understand, must break.

Kidding aside, it is really nice to be able to drive 500 miles and have the exact same stuff that is at home. Soooo convenient.

dweezil13 writes:

in response to gross1157:

The Sunsphere would have been the more perfect place to have housed the Women's basketball hall of fame.It's already in the shape of a basketball and more have a real unique place to have put it.Just a spilled milk thought..

Don't mention women,the shape of the Sunsphere and milk in the same comment.You know the way us guys think.

cjensen writes:

patrickbeeson writes:
in response to JFET:

I quit drinking ales years ago because they give me acute stomach pain... maybe 20 minutes after the first sip.

The Downtown Brewery's decision on lagers is just that - their decision. But to be forced to make the choice between a stomach ache and Budweiser... that puts me, the customer, in an untenable position.

You may want to consider the fact that Budweiser is less "beer" than anything Woodruff's makes.

I guess the chemicals make it go down easier. :)"
--------------------------------
Budweiser is beer? Are you kidding me? I thought it was recycled urine....though not quite as salty.

Pickle_Parks writes:

in response to ROAD_FOREMAN_OF_ENGINES:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Very well put. We were sold a bill of goods by Jake Butcher, CH Butcher and other future felons who sought to make a quick buck off of the world's fair. The fair site sat unused for about 20 years before the city finally redeveloped it. Still, World's Fair Park does little to generate jobs or revenue.

We were also conned a few years later by Chris Whittle. Remember him?

We must take all of these schemes with several grains of salt, lest history repeat itself.

volhome writes:

in response to JFET:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

As a fan of the entire range of darker brews, the Downtown Nut Brown Ale and the State Street Stout are both excellent. The New World Porter does not compete well with Marty Velas' Porter at Smoky Mountain Brewery, but is a passable fare. My wife dearly loves the Woodruff IPA, so we do enjoy from all ranges of the strata.

You must remember that microbreweries are in the business of selling their own product. Macrobrews can be enjoyed in several other restaraunts, or the privacy of your own home. Remeber, the region lost one of the best microbreweries (Rocky River Brewery in Sevierville) because they catered to the unrefined tastes and carried macrobrews at a similar price as the microbrews. A valuable lesson to learn is that if you are going to sell the competitors product, you may want to make it less appealing (more expensive) than your own. I miss RRB, and hope DG&B learn from their mistakes.

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