Tag Archives: ProPublica

Electric cars: A stimulus success story

Depending on your politics, the $800 billion stimulus was a rousing success or a crushing failure. Neither is accurate.

Like most things in the political world, the truth is somewhere in the middle. For a balanced look at what the Recovery Act has done for the economy, check out ProPublica’s “Eye on the Stimulus” series.

The latest report: “How the Stimulus Revived the Electric Car”

“Automakers have unveiled a number of mass-market electric cars, which have seen small but rising sales,” writes author Michael Grabell.  “Battery and parts manufacturers are building 30 factories, creating thousands of new jobs…If it wasn’t for the stimulus, the companies say, they would have built these plants overseas.”

ProPublica is an independent, non-profit newsroom that won Pulitizer Prizes for its reporting in 2010 and 2011.

Drug makers pay big money to East Tennessee docs

Dozens of East Tennessee doctors have received millions of dollars in fees from major drug
Earns Eli Lilly.JPGcompanies in recent years, according to an updated report by the ProPublica public interest website.

Some East Tennessee doctors each were paid $50,000 to $100,000 by AstraZeneca, Cephalon, Eli Lilly, Pfizer and other pharmaceutical companies, according to the “Dollars for Docs” update published Wednesday. A total of more than $20 million went to doctors throughout Tennessee from 2009 to 2011.

Payments include speaking and consulting fees, research, travel and meal costs.

Is your doctor on the list?

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ProPublica details NLRB-Boeing dispute

ProPublica today lays out the facts and a sampling of the political theater surrounding the National Labor Relations Board’s dispute with Boeing.

The government sued Boeing for allegedly punishing its union work force in Washington state by changing the location of a new plant to South Carolina, a so-called right-to-work state.

The case is being widely watched by pro- and anti-union forces. Even some of the presidential candidates have chimed in. As usual, the political rhetoric hasn’t helped matters at all.

Here’s the link:

Primer: In Labor Board Dispute With Boeing, Growing Controversy Clouds Facts

Why financial reform bill has been delayed

In a report published today, ProPublica takes a look what’s delayed implementation of the Dodd-Frank financial reform bill.

You won’t be surprised to learn that politics and bureaucracy have gotten in the way.

Coincidentally, Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tennessee, is in Knoxville today to talk about the nation’s financial challenges.

Here’s an excerpt from the ProPublica report:

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How GE games the tax code and what it really pays

ProPublica offers an in-depth look at how General Electric games the system to pay as little federal taxes as possible.

It’s not illegal for GE to use using the tax code to its advantage. But it’s interesting to see how much GE spends on tax avoidance.

Here are the ProPublica stories:

5 Ways GE Plays the Tax Game

Setting The Record Straight on GE’s Taxes

Goldman Sachs’ promises not so transparent

ProPublica columnist Jesse Eisinger offers a withering take on Goldman Sachs’ promise last week to behave better and be more open about its business dealings.

In a nutshell, Eisinger finds the 63-page Business Standards Committee Report a public relations stunt.

” … Some of it was welcome, like the increased financial disclosure. Some may fall by the wayside, like most New Year’s resolutions. Some seems as disingenuous as any piece of professional flackery,” Eisinger writes.

Eisinger’s column: Goldman’s Self-Help: Eat, Pay, Trade

Goldman Sachs’ Business Standards Committee Report

ProPublica/PBS report details BP’s ‘culture of neglect’

Gulf+Oil+Spill+Baby+Ani(8).jpgA new investigation by the public interest website ProPublica and PBS Frontline uncovers how “a corporate culture of neglect and carelessness” at BP lead to the biggest oil spill in U.S. history.

The company was determined to let nothing interfere with “corporate efficiency, lean budgets and shareholder profits,” according to the report.

Read the full ProPublica story here.

PBS will broadcast its story, “The Spill” tonight

Photo: A baby pelican impacted by oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is seen at the Fort Jackson Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Buras, La., Thursday, July 8, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert):

More bad PR for BP — what a surprise!

The public interest journalism website ProPublica posted an interesting lineup of BP stories today. 

Highlights include a report on a photographer’s run-in with BP security in Texas while shooting pics for a ProPublica story.  BP security was more than a bit heavy handed.

And there’s this report on a vintage BP-branded board game called “Offshore Oil Strike.”

“And true to life, the game is driven by profit–first player to make $120 million wins. But watch out for those “hazard cards,” one of which states : “Blow-out! Rig damaged. Oil slick clean-up costs. Pay $1million,” ProPublica reports.

Former SEC chairman criticizes financial reform bill

Former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt offers scathing comments on the financial reform bill in an interview with ProPublica.

Levitt says it’s “ridiculous” to call the new bill the biggest financial reform since the Great Depression. The biggest omission from the bill is “shareholder access to the proxy,” he says.

Read the full interview here.