Tag Archives: housing

Manpower: Metro Knox hiring to improve in 2Q

Job Openings

Hiring in metropolitan Knoxville is expected to show healthy improvement in the second quarter, according to the Manpower Employment Outlook Survey released Tuesday.
Seventeen percent of Knoxville area employers surveyed said they planned to add jobs in the April to June period, while only 1 percent said they would trim payrolls, Manpower reported.
Construction related businesses are among a broad range of area companies expected to add jobs in the coming quarter.
“We’re seeing a lot more activity in construction. We’re seeing a lot more opportunities,” said  Bill Garibay, president and CEO of ES&H Inc., a Knoxville-based company that provides professional services in construction, remediation, environmental, and safety and health support.
An improving economy is driving increased hiring, said Garibay, who also is president of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of East Tennessee.
“The economy is making a turn. The housing market is making a turn and people are starting to spend money,” he said.
Area employers were considerably more cautious about adding jobs in the first quarter when 13 percent said they would hire in January through March period, while 9 percent expected to cut staff , Manpower reported.
In addition to construction, other Knox area job sectors with the best employment opportunities include, durable goods manufacturing, nondurable goods manufacturing, transportation and utilities, wholesale and retail trade, financial activities, professional and business services, education and health services, leisure and hospitality and government, Manpower said.
Nationwide, 19 percent of employers surveyed plan to add jobs in the second quarter and 4 percent said they would cut staff.
Manpower surveyed more than 18,000 employers across the country for its second quarter report.

Knoxville picked as one of best retirement cities

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Knoxville is one of the best places to retire, according to a new list of the top retirement locales in the country.
Knoxville is ranked No. 7 on the list compiled by the website Livability.com.
The list includes a broad range of cities with Cincinnati ranked No. 1. Rounding out the top five are St. Louis, Baton Rouge, La.; Provo, Utah; and Pittsburgh.
The rankings were based on criteria identified by the website’s survey livability survey conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs.
“We found that health care, housing and cost of living were most important to seniors, followed by transportation, parks, crime and cultural amenities,” accordiong to the website.
Compiling “Best of” lists has become a cottage industry and it seems a new one is published every week. For the most part they are an eye-of-the beholder thing, so if you find some of the cities on this list questionable, you are not alone. Here’s an excerpt from the website’s description of Knoxville. Here’s an excerpt from the website’s description of Knoxville.

“Each season brings new sports to watch, activities to try and natural blessings. Knoxville’s rolling hills, historic architecture and college town vibe create an innovative atmosphere. Located in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, on the Tennessee River and surrounded by seven lakes, the city pops with color during the fall. Outdoor recreation options in Knoxville keep residents on the go. The city scored high in parks, and its residents frequently engage in cultural activities,
Click here for the full list.

Click here for the full list.

Knoxville makes Top 100 small- to mid-sized cities list

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Knoxville is one of the Top 100 most livable small- to mid-sized cities in the country, according to a new survey by Livability.com.
The website ranked towns with populations between 20,000 and 350,000 based on eight categories — economics, housing, amenities, infrastructure, demographics, social and civic capital, education and health care.
Only two Tennessee cities made the Top 100 — Knoxville, No. 61 and Chattanooga, No. 83.
California dominated the rankings with 27 of the Top 100. Palo Alto topped the list.
Knoxville ranked highest in education, amenities and health care and lowest in demographics and infrastructure.
Here’s what Livability.com said about Knoxville:
“Located in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, Knoxville offers an affordable cost of living and abundance of recreation. Businesses cite the city’s strategic location, and as home to the University of Tennessee and nearby Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the area is widely recognized as a center for research and technology. Knoxville ranked on our Top 10 Cities for College Grads list for its diverse business climate and growing downtown.”
It’s hard to imagine there are 60 places better than Knoxville, but at  least were fared better than Chattanooga.
Click here for the full list of Top 100 small- to mid-sized cities.

Tenn. economy should be ‘substantially stronger’ in 2014

Tennessee’s economy will continue modest growth this year, but should be “substantially stronger”in 2014, University of Tennessee economists said today.

On the national scene, the economy is expected to grow slowly in the coming months with a steady decline in the unemployment rate, according to the annual economic forecast prepared for the governor by UT’s Center for Business and Economic Research.

“The U.S. economy is projected to continue to grow in the quarters ahead and the unemployment rate will continue its slow but steady decline,” said Matt Murray, associate director of CBER and the report’s author. “For Tennessee, the economic outlook calls for modest growth in 2013 followed by substantially stronger growth in 2014.”

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UT economists forecast modest growth in 2013

Tennessee’s economy is moving forward, but progress remains painfully slow, according to a University of Tennessee report released today.

After “exceptionally strong rates of economic expansion” in the first quarter, the state economy slowed sharply in the second quarter as effects of the debt crisis in Europe rippled across the globe, says the fall 2012 Business and Economic Outlook.

However, UT economists see the state and national economies posting modest gains through the first half of 2013.

Significant economic improvement is still a year or two away, according to the study prepared by the university’s Center for Business and Economic Research.

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Value added tax, abolish Congress, more stimulus and other ideas

Here’s an interesting take on what the government really should do to fix the economy. The writer
ETP02.SY.jpgsuggests a little bit of everything.

Can’t say I agree with all of the writer’s ideas, but some — value added tax, infrastructure investment, new stimulus for housing, controlling entitlement costs — make a lot of sense.

U.S. News & World Report: What Bernanke Wants Congress To Do

Economic roller coaster continues

The Commerce Department released its third estimate of first quarter GDP and once again it’s lower. Apparently, consumers didn’t spend as much in the quarter as previously thought and the GDP rose 2.7 percent, instead of 3 percent.

We all wish the economy was recovering faster, but at least it’s growing and continued growth looks likely.

On Thursday, government reports showed that businesses have been spending more on machinery, computers, metals and other goods in the second quarter. That is a strong indicator that businesses are positive about the coming months, will boost production and may finally start hiring later in the year.

Another good sign: The average interest rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage fell to the lowest point on record — 4.69 percent. That hopefully will boost home sales, which dropped in May when the end of the federal tax break for homebuyers.

However, interest rates have been low for months and the housing market hasn’t really responded.

And this week brought the latest word from the big brains at the Federal Reserve. And that word was “fragile.”

The Fed expects the economy to keep growing, but the board’s mood was less upbeat than before. Its outlook is tempered by a sluggish domestic labor market and concern about Europe’s financial crisis.

Whew! What a week. I need a vacation.