Tag Archives: e-mail

Free money — no strings attached

You wouldn’t believe how lucky I’ve been lately. According to some recent e-mails I am in line
PAULSON+MONEY.jpgfor big money.

All I have to do is send my personal financial information to addresses in South Africa, Dubai and Hong Kong.

Mr. Chinyemba says if I allow him to deposit “35 million American Dollars” in my overseas account for three years I get to keep 20 percent.

That’s just for starters.

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E-mail scam targets electronic tax payment system

Paying taxes is annoying enough, but a new e-mail scam is making it even more of a pain.

The Internal Revenue Service said today that a new e-mail scam targets businesses and individuals who use the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System to pay their taxes.

“This scam claims you made a tax payment through EFTPS that was rejected,” said IRS spokesman Dan Boone.

The IRS does not send e-mails about your taxes, Boone added.

If you get one of these scam e-mails, or anything similar, forward the e-mail to the IRS using the instructions at IRS.gov.

Dumb e-mail mistakes

Repeat after me: E-mail can get you in trouble.

One would think that by now allegedly smart people — like the boys at Goldman Sachs — would understand that e-mail lasts forever. If you write something stupid or incriminating, eventually it will come back to haunt you.

If your language is particularly colorful, it will go viral and your mother is going to hear about your potty mouth from people she doesn’t know.

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Palin e-mail hacker vs. past computer crimes

With a jury deciding David C. Kernell’s fate in the Sarah Palin e-mail hacking case, I find myself wondering that if he is convicted how will his sentence compare to the sentences of other computer hacking cases.

Will Kernell lose as many years of freedom as did Kevin Mitnick or a William Randolph Royere III?

Mitnick, you may recall, was once labeled the most wanted computer criminal in U.S. history. Royere is less well known, perhaps, but equally interesting in the annals of hacking crime.

For your brief reading pleasure, contrast and compare the Kernell case with that of Mitnick and Royere.

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