Trust me, I’m from the government

Government number crunchers always provide fascinating reading.

Today, for example, the Commerce Department said the GDP from 1998-2007 was on average actually 2.7 percent, or $301.5 billion, higher that we thought.

Higher, that is, “if research and development (R&D) spending was treated as investment in the U.S. national income and product accounts,” according to the the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

So, does that mean if we count R&D spending the recession really wasn’t all that bad?


More highlights from the report:

“R&D accounted for about 6.3 percent of average annual growth in real GDP — that is, GDP adjusted for inflation — between 1998 and 2007, and 6.6 percent between 2002 and 2007. To put the contribution of R&D in perspective, the business sector’s investment in commercial and other types of structures accounted for just over 1.3 percent of average annual growth in real GDP between 1998 and 2007,” the release says.

Read the full release here.

Chart: Real GDP Adjusted by Treating R&D as Investment and Real R&D Investment

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