Tag Archives: yard

Rep. Hurley Pulls Up Libertarian Signs (at landowner request)

State Rep. Julia Hurley was seen pulling up and tossing down a campaign sign at a major Loudon County intersection, reports the News Sentinel. Apparently someone complained, but the lawmaker says the signs were on private property and she was following the landowner’s request.
Hurley, who lost her re-election bid for the 32nd Legislative District seat in the GOP primary, said Jennifer Wampler owns the property at the intersection of Highway 321 and Highway 11 in Lenoir City.
“They didn’t ask permission to place their signs there,” Hurley said.
Hurley said she “gently” placed the sign of Dr. Shaun Crowell on the ground. Crowell is an independent candidate seeking to unseat incumbent U.S. Senator Bob Corker, a Republican.
Also on the ground: A sign touting independent presidential candidate Gary Johnson.
(Note: Gary Johnson is the Libertarian Party nominee for president; Crowell has been endorsed by the Libertarian Party. Both are listed on Tennessee’s ballot as independent candidates.)
“His (Crowell’s) sign was literally right next to the sidewalk,” said businessman Brad Boring, who said he watched Hurley pull it up Sunday morning.
“That close to the road is private property?” he asked. “I don’t believe so.” Boring questioned whether the sign was within state right-of-way.
Guidelines for campaign sign locations vary by jurisdiction.
In Lenoir City, signs on land beyond sidewalks are deemed as being on private property, and the landowners have the final say-so on allowing them, city Codes Enforcement Officer Leslie Johnson said.
Political signs between sidewalks and road curbs are on either state or city rights of way, she said.

Vandy Study: Yard Signs = Name Recognition = More Votes

News release from Vanderbilt University:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. – “What’s in a name?” Juliet Capulet asks in one of William Shakespeare’s best known plays. If you’re talking about elections in which voters don’t know the candidates very well, the answer is quite a lot, according to new Vanderbilt political science research.
Mere name recognition can give candidates an important advantage in political races in which voters know little about any of the contenders, according to the study by political scientists Cindy Kam and Elizabeth Zechmeister.
“Our study offers fairly conclusive evidence that, in low-information races, a candidate’s name recognition alone positively affects voter support,” said Zechmeister, who co-authored the paper with Kam.
Although the media pays a lot of attention to high-profile races, in the majority of decisions that American voters make, they have very little information about the candidates. Sometimes partisanship is not even available, so voters need to rely on some shortcuts to make decisions. “These findings are important because low-information races are the rule, not the exception, in American politics,” said Kam.

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