Tag Archives: violations

DCS Commissioner’s Child Care Nonprofit Violated State Rules

The Knoxville nonprofit that Department of Children’s Services Commissioner Kate O’Day led for 10 years amassed numerous state rule violations before she left the agency, according to records obtained by The Tennessean.
Some of the violations that occurred while O’Day was CEO of Child and Family Tennessee were minor – personnel files missing dates that reference checks were completed — but others were far more serious.
On March 15, 2010, just nine months before becoming Gov. Bill Haslam’s pick to lead the state’s child welfare agency, O’Day was put on notice that DCS had “concerns for the safety and well-being of custodial youths placed at Child and Family Tennessee.” The nonprofit was a contractor hired by DCS to care for kids in foster care or residential treatment facilities.
DCS suspended all admissions to Child and Family, a step taken only for the most serious agency violations. In the case of Child and Family, those included inappropriately doling out group punishments for the actions of a single youth, missing medication records and a failure to focus on youths’ “needs, strengths and permanence,” among the eight serious findings outlined in a letter from DCS.
O’Day’s agency was one of three statewide that year whose admissions were frozen in 2010, but records obtained by the newspaper outline serious violations at the agency for annual inspections from 2006 to 2009. Pre-2006 inspection reports were not available.

Audit Finds Fault With Supervision of Paroled Sex Offenders

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A recent audit of Tennessee’s parole and probation system found officers failed to properly supervise sex offenders, sometimes allowing them access to children.
The Tennessean reports (http://tnne.ws/RWkfM9) the state monitors about 800 felons by GPS. Most of them are sex offenders.
However, auditors found that parole and probation officers were ignoring many of the alerts they received when sex offenders enter a prohibited area, such as a school zone. Only about 18 percent of the alerts were thoroughly investigated.
In 2010, parole officers noticed through GPS that Christopher Federico was living near a daycare in Nashville. They followed up when he failed to attend his sex offender treatment program, pay his state supervision fees and take polygraph tests.
In a July 2010 home visit, parole officers found two children sobbing in a crawlspace.
Authorities rescued the children and Federico was convicted of violating his sex offender provisions.

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