Tag Archives: text

Text of Haslam’s speech to special session on Insure Tennessee

Prepared text of Gov. Haslam’s speech to the 109th General Assembly (Note: He added some interesting stuff) at the outset of a special session on a proposed “Insure Tennessee” Monday evening:

Lt. Gov. Ramsey, Speaker Harwell, and members of the Tennessee General Assembly:

Let me begin by thanking you for the opportunity to come before you as you begin this Special Session. Calling a Special Session, which I’ve never done before, is not something I take lightly. I understand the difficulty of the subject we will be discussing. Issues surrounding health care are complex, and the politics can seem difficult, but there are few challenges facing our state or our country today as great as those presented by our broken health care system. I just don’t believe that we can sit back and do nothing.

It might be worth it to remind ourselves how we got here. In 2010, Congress passed the Affordable Care Act. It was a massive piece of legislation that passed on a totally partisan basis. It was incredibly controversial then, and today, over five years later, it remains controversial.

In June of 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on a question about the legality of the Affordable Care Act. In a somewhat surprising ruling, they determined that the Affordable Care Act was constitutional but that the federal government could not force states to expand their Medicaid programs. Every state was left to decide on its own whether or not to cover the newly eligible population. While some states immediately decided that they would, others quickly said no.

In Tennessee, we took time to evaluate our options to find the right answer for our state. In March of 2013, almost two years ago, I was in this chamber to tell you that Tennessee would not expand our Medicaid program. Expanding a broken system doesn’t make sense. But, I also didn’t think that flat out saying no to accepting federal dollars that Tennesseans are paying for, that are going to other states, and that could cover more Tennesseans who truly need insurance made much sense either.
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Text of Obama’s Chattanooga speech, as delivered

Here is the White House transcript of President Obama’s speech today in Chattanooga, as delivered:

THE PRESIDENT: Hello, Chattanooga! (Applause.) It is good to be back in Tennessee. (Applause.) It’s great to be here at Amazon. (Applause.)

I want to thank Lydia for the introduction and sharing her story. Give Lydia a big round of applause. (Applause.) So this is something here. I just finished getting a tour of just one little corner of this massive facility — size of 28 football fields. Last year, during the busiest day of the Christmas rush, customers around the world ordered more than 300 items from Amazon every second, and a lot of those traveled through this building. So this is kind of like the North Pole of the south right here. (Applause.) Got a bunch of good-looking elves here.

Before we start, I want to recognize your general manager, Mike Thomas. (Applause.) My tour guide and your vice president, Dave Clark. (Applause.) You’ve got the Mayor of Chattanooga, Andy Berke. (Applause.) And you’ve got one of the finest gentlemen I know, your Congressman, Jim Cooper. (Applause.) So thank you all for being here.
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Text of Haslam’s Speech on Medicaid Expansion

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Here is the full text Gov. Bill Haslam’s prepared remarks to the Tennessee General Assembly on Wednesday, when he announced the state won’t expand Medicaid as part of the federal health care overhaul.
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I appreciate the opportunity to speak this morning. I’m well aware this is an extremely busy time, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to come before you today. It is the first time I’ve asked to do this outside of the State of the State, but I asked for this opportunity because.
There is no more important issue, or more complex issue facing our country and our state today than healthcare, and I wanted to update you about where we are regarding Medicaid expansion.
This may look like a simple decision. On one side, people think how could we not accept federal money to expand Medicaid to cover more Tennesseans and on the other, why in the world would we accept funds tied to ObamaCare knowing the federal government can’t pay for it? But it isn’t that easy.

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Text of Sen. Alexander’s ‘Peaceful, Orderly’ Remarks at Obama Inauguration

The text of Sen. Lamar Alexander’s remarks during inauguration ceremonies for President Barack Obama, as provided by his office:
“The late Alex Haley, the author of Roots, lived his life by these six words: Find the Good and Praise It.
“Today we praise the American tradition of transferring or reaffirming immense power as we inaugurate the President of the United States.
“We do this in a peaceful, orderly way.
“There is no mob, no coup, no insurrection.
“This is a moment when millions stop and watch.
“A moment most of us always will remember.
“A moment that is the most conspicuous and enduring symbol of our democracy.
“How remarkable that this has survived for so long in such a complex country with so much power at stake–this freedom to vote for our leaders and the restraint to respect the results.
“Last year, a tour guide at Mt. Vernon told me that our first president, George Washington, posed this question: ‘What is most important of this grand experiment, the United States?’
“And then Washington gave this answer: ‘Not the election of the first president, but the election of its second president. The peaceful transition of power is what will separate this country from every other country in the world.’
“Today we celebrate, because this is the 57th inauguration of the American President.
“Find the Good and Praise It.
“Now, it is my honor to introduce Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Sonia Sotomayor, who will administer the oath of office to the Vice President.
“Everyone please stand.”

DesJarlais to Haslam: ‘Thanks for Withholding Judgment’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam’s office has released a text message sent by U.S. Rep. Scott DesJarlais after details emerged about the congressman once urging a mistress to seek an abortion.
Haslam said at the time that he didn’t want to opine on the subject until speaking with DesJarlais — a conversation that still hasn’t taken place three week later.
DesJarlais in the text message dated Oct. 11 thanked the governor, a fellow Republican, for withholding judgment. He also offered to speak to Haslam at his convenience.
The congressman doesn’t dispute a transcript of the conversation with a woman he dated while she was also under his care as a doctor. But he has said he was only using strong language to persuade her to admit she wasn’t pregnant.

Cooper Expects FEC to OK Texting for Dollars

The small print at the bottom of ads for federal politicians may soon get a new wrinkle — one that tells you to contribute to candidate X or Y by texting on your mobile phone, reports The Tennessean.
The proposal comes from Rep. Jim Cooper, D-Nashville, who said he expects the Federal Election Commission to give its final approval to the idea sometime this week.
“More and more people use their phones for just about anything,” Cooper said in an interview. “It’s so convenient.”
A whole generation of Americans, he added, has grown up with texting as central to their lifestyles. And Americans are used to texting to donate to charities of all kinds.
Different candidates, Cooper said, would have different five-digit codes that could be listed on their advertising.
The idea is to encourage more people to contribute to campaigns through small-dollar donations, counteracting the influence of millionaires and billionaires who max out in their contributions to candidates and political action committees and give unlimited amounts to Super PACs and other groups.
“It allows small donors to have a louder voice,” Cooper said

Text of Michelle Obama’s Nashville Speech

From the White House Communications Office:
Remarks by the First Lady at the African Methodist Episcopal Church Conference at Gaylord Opryland Resort, Nashville, Tenn., on Thursday, June 27, 2012:
11:05 A.M. CDT
MRS. OBAMA: Oh, my, my, my. (Applause.) Please, you all rest yourselves. Thank you so much. Let me tell you, it is such a pleasure and an honor to join you today in Nashville for your 2012 General Conference.
I want to start by thanking Bishop McKenzie for her introduction. And I want to honor her for the history she’s made —
AUDIENCE MEMBER: Amen!
MRS. OBAMA: Absolutely. (Applause.) For the example she has set and for her inspired leadership in this church.
I also want to thank Mayor Dean for his service to this city and for taking the time to join us here today.
And finally, I want to thank all of the bishops, pastors, and lay leaders in AME churches here in America and around the world. (Applause.)
You all are part of a proud tradition, one that dates back to the founding of that first AME Church and the founding of this nation and has shaped its history every day since. You all know the story — how back in the late 1700s, a man named Richard Allen bought his freedom from slavery — (applause) — became a minister, and eventually founded a Methodist church called Bethel Church – or “Mother Bethel” as we know it today. That first AME church was located in a blacksmith’s shop, and that first congregation had just a few dozen members.
But there’s a reason why one pastor called Bethel’s founding “a Liberty bell for black folks.” (Applause.) There’s a reason why W.E.B. Dubois said that Bethel Church “belongs to the history of the nation rather than to any one city.”

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Corker Bashes Obama, Democrats in ‘Weekly Republican Address’

Text of Sen. Bob Corker’s “weekly Republican address,” delivered Saturday, as provided by his office to media:
“I’m Bob Corker, and I’m proud to represent Tennessee in the United States Senate.
“When I was 25 years old, I saved $8,000 and started my own construction company. I worked hard, and my business expanded. Our country’s free enterprise system gave me the opportunity to earn success and to live the American Dream.
“I became involved in public service to help provide my neighbors with the opportunity to experience the American Dream themselves, and I came to Washington with the same goal.
“But I fear our country is moving to a place where politicians have lost sight of the value of earned success.

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On Jimmy Naifeh’s Retirement Announcement (including text)

House Speaker Emeritus Jimmy Naifeh announced today that he would not seek election to another term. Here’s the news release issued by his office:
News release:
NASHVILLE – Speaker Emeritus Jimmy Naifeh (D-Covington) announced today on the House floor that he will not seek re-election to his district 81 seat this fall. Naifeh has served in the House of Representatives for 38-years, 18 of which he spent as Speaker of the House.
“Governor McWherter always told me when it was time to go home, I’d know it. After talking with my family and friends, I believe the time has come for me to pass the torch to the next generation of leaders,” said Speaker Naifeh. “All told, I’ve given 40 years of my life to public service: 38 in the legislature and two as an Infantry Officer in the Army. Now I’m looking forward to a little more time for myself and a lot more time with my grandkids.”
Naifeh was elected to the House of Representatives in 1974, after losing his first bid for office in 1972 by 13 votes. Since that time he has never lost an election. In addition to being the longest serving Speaker of the House in Tennessee history, Naifeh served as Floor Leader, Majority Leader and President of the National Speaker’s Conference.
He has received numerous legislator of the year and service awards during his tenure, including the prestigious William M. Bulger award which is given every other year to one state legislative leader who has worked to preserve and build public trust and whose career embodies the principles of integrity, compassion, vision and courage.
“In all aspects of my life, I’ve always tried to be an effective leader. I think a lot of that stems from my army training. When I came to the House, it was no different. I got into leadership during my second term with the ultimate goal of becoming Speaker. I achieved that goal and I’m proud of what I accomplished during that time.”
Naifeh is a long-time supporter of public education and places the Jimmy Naifeh Center in Covington, a branch of Dyersburg State Community College, among his most proud accomplishments. Outside the legislature Naifeh’s work with St. Jude is well known. For the past 19 years, he has hosted an annual legislative golf tournament in Nashville to benefit ALSAC/St.Jude, where he serves on the Board of Directors.
“My Dad came here from Lebanon and couldn’t even speak English! He always told me what a privilege it was to live in this country and that we had a responsibility to give back. Whether it was my work with St. Jude or in the legislature, I’ve always tried to remember that and use what power I had to improve the lives of everyday people.”
Naifeh has 3 children (Jim, Beth and Sameera) and 6 grandchildren (Sarah, Jay, Sam, Jameson, Jack and Katherine). He plans to explore future options, while spending more time with his grandchildren.
NOTE: More below, including text of Naifeh’s remarks and other news releases.

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Today’s Links to Occupy Nashville Stuff

Text of the lawsuit filed against Legislative Plaza curfew by Occupy Nashville is HERE.
State Rep. Mike Stewart’s post on state Democratic Party website denouncing legislative curfew is HERE.
Tennessee Republican Chairman Chris Devany’s statement denouncing Democrats for “aligning themselves with “Occupy Nashville” protestors” is HERE.