Tag Archives: target

Republicans Target Rep. Johnson, Kill Her Bills

State Rep. Gloria Johnson, a Knoxville Democrat who succeeded longtime lawmaker Harry Tindell last year, is just into the third month of her first term but already is a target by Republicans in 2014, reports Georgiana Vines.
She was mentioned last week in a news release put out by the Tennessee Republican Party in which she was criticized for pushing a bill (HB1301) requiring cities, counties and other political subdivisions to grant an unpaid leave of absence to full-time employees for service in the Legislature. The bill died in the State Government Subcommittee for lack of a second.
Chris Devaney, state GOP chair, said in the release that Johnson, an educator, pushed the mandate on local governments to make “a change to the law that she would personally benefit from.”
“It’s a lie,” Johnson said Friday. “That law had nothing to do with me. This is for police and firefighters. It came from another representative (Antonio Parkinson of Memphis) who had already used all his bills.”
State law already allows teachers to be given a leave of absence to serve in the Legislature, she said.
She said she feels another bill failed to get a second in the State Government Subcommittee on March 27 — even though it passed the Senate unanimously — because she is the House sponsor.
The bill (HB676) required meetings of certain boards and commissions, like the Tennessee Election Commission, be made available by video streaming over the Internet. The only Democrat on the subcommittee, Rep. Johnny Shaw of Bolivar, moved for approval.
“I couldn’t get a second. Even the Election Commission unanimously supported the bill. I’m No. 1 the Republicans want to defeat,” she said
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Alexander, Corker Question IRS Targeting Tea Parties

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee senators Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker are among 12 Republican senators who are questioning whether the Obama administration is using the Internal Revenue Service to target tea party-related nonprofit organizations.
The dozen sent a letter Wednesday to IRS Commissioner Douglas Schulman seeking assurances that the agency’s recent string of inquiries into some tea party-affiliated nonprofits is not based on politics.
The letter says the senators have received complaints of excessive IRS inquiries from organizations in Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio and Texas.
“The extra scrutiny the IRS appears to be giving tea-party related nonprofits is disturbing, so I hope we find that the IRS is treating all tax-exempt organizations the same,” Alexander said in a statement. “The government should not have what amounts to an enemies list based on what people or organizations say or believe, and if it turns out the IRS is denying tea party groups the proper tax status because of what they have to say, it must stop and those responsible most be held accountable.”
A spokesman for the IRS did not immediately return a phone call to The Associated Press seeking comment.
The organizations have been complaining that the IRS is purposely trying to thwart their attempts at achieving tax exempt status.
The organizations are applying under section 501(c)(4) of the federal tax code, which grants tax-exempt status to nonprofits for the promotion of social welfare. The 501 501(c)(4)s can engage in lobbying and political campaigning, but don’t have to disclose who is donating money to them.
In addition to Alexander and Corker, the other senators who signed the letter were: Mitch McConnell and Sen. Rand Paul, both of Kentucky, Orrin Hatch, (Utah), Rob Portman (Ohio), Chuck Grassley (Iowa), Pat Roberts (Kan.), John Cornyn (Texas), Kay Bailey Hutchison (Texas), John Kyle ( Ariz.), and John Tune (S.D.)

Fincher: I Won’t Be a Target (though Democrats suggest otherwise)

By Adrian Sainz, Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. — U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher already has raised more than $900,000 for his re-election campaign, while Democrats are targeting his 8th District seat as they wait for a candidate to come forward.
Fincher, a Republican from Frog Jump, is wrapping up his first year in the GOP-controlled House. The freshman congressman has voted mostly along Republican party lines and received a prestigious committee promotion, while also building a bank account that places him in a strong position heading into the 2012 election.
With Tennessee’s Republican-controlled General Assembly in charge of redistricting, Fincher’s hold on the northwest Tennessee seat could get even tighter if lines are re-drawn to accommodate more Republicans and fewer Democrats in the district.
National Democrats, however, say Fincher can be beat in 2012. They claim he has turned his back on his soybean, corn and cotton farming district by moving from the Agriculture Committee to the big-bucks Financial Affairs Committee. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has blasted out several email attacks on Fincher, setting the groundwork for next year.
“Fincher Opposed $300,394 To Hire Tennessee Cops,” says the headline of one e-mail. “Representative Fincher’s Failure Creating Jobs,” says another.
Fincher, who voted for House Speaker John Boehner’s debt reduction bill and the repeal of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, doesn’t agree that he’s vulnerable.
“We’ll have the funds we need to run a successful and aggressive campaign — which is why the Democrats won’t target the 8th,” Fincher wrote in an email interview with The Associated Press. “The same folks that brought me to the dance are continuing to support me.”

Cooper, Fincher Top National Partisan Targets in TN

Blast emails sent by political party committees accuse Democratic Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville of supporting “job-destroying policies” and Republican Rep. Stephen Fincher of Frog Jump of accepting “tainted” campaign cash, reports The Tennessean.
Since mid-September, the National Republican Congressional Committee has sent at least six emails to reporters and fundraisers targeting Cooper, and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has sent at least 10 blasting Fincher.
A handful of DCCC emails also target Republican Rep. Scott DesJarlais of Jasper. The emails take aim at lawmakers considered vulnerable in the 2012 election.
“Fincher has always been one of our top targets,” said Adam Hodge, a spokesman for the DCCC. “I think it’s just a race we can win.”
Andrea Bozek, a spokeswoman for the NRCC, said the same of Cooper. He and other fiscally conservative Blue Dog Democrats were decimated in last November’s election, and that trend probably will continue in 2012, she said.
“They are out of tricks,” she said.