Tag Archives: Spring

Judge Blocks Town Law Limiting Campaign Signs

SPRING HILL, Tenn. (AP) — A Middle Tennessee court has temporarily barred Spring Hill from limiting residents to one political campaign yard sign per office.
According to The Daily Herald (http://bit.ly/YgGNpv ) in Columbia, the restraining order was obtained by George Jones, who is running for mayor of Spring Hill. He says a local ordinance limiting campaign signs to one per resident for each office is unconstitutional. Jones is a former mayor of the city of more than 23,000 residents.
Circuit Court Judge Robert L. Holloway issued the temporary order Wednesday, pending an April 5 hearing. The city election day is April 11.
Spring Hill City Administrator Victor Lay said the city will comply with the judge’s instructions, but he declined further comment.

Corker Still Disdained by Autoworkers

SPRING HILL, Tenn. (AP) — Autoworkers’ joy at getting vehicle production back on line at General Motors’ Spring Hill plant has done little to quell their disdain for Republican U.S. Sen. Bob Corker.
Corker was a lead critic of the federal government bailout of automakers in 2009, and pushed for wage and benefit concessions from the United Auto Workers. Many Spring Hill workers felt Corker’s stance did little to keep the plant from being idled that year.
The senator was booed and heckled by the audience when he spoke at a ceremony Monday to announce the plant outside Nashville will begin making vehicles again next year. Corker listened to 20 seconds of jeers after his introduction in the plants manufacturing hall.
“I see the saga continues,” Corker told the crowd. “I think everyone knows that we’ve had our differences in the past. And I can tell today that that’s fine with you, and it’s fine with me.”
Corker then urged workers to take advantage of the opportunity presented by the company’s investment in the plant that is projected to result in 1,900 jobs by the 2015 model year.

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TNDP: Thank Obama, Not Republicans, for GM Reopening at Spring Hill

News release from Tennessee Democratic Party:
NASHVILLE – In response to General Motors’ announcement Monday at Spring Hill attended by Governor Bill Haslam, Sen. Bob Corker and Rep. Scott DesJarlais, Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Chip Forrester released the following statement:
“General Motors’ expansion in Spring Hill is great news for Tennesseans and a huge credit is owed to the United Auto Workers, who made the deal that got this plant fully reopened. Over the coming months, we will see more than 1,700 new GM jobs and countless jobs created through the parts supply chain. This announcement boosts Tennessee’s economy and strengthens our communities.
“But this announcement would not be possible without President Obama’s successful loan to the auto industry, which gave automakers a pathway to profitability and saved hundreds of thousands of American jobs.
“It’s upsetting that some politicians said Spring Hill auto workers weren’t worth the time and fixing the American auto industry wasn’t worth the money, but today’s announcement shows the President’s investment paid off.
“What’s more upsetting is that some politicians are taking credit for these new jobs when they’ve opposed similar investments or sat silent when these deals were negotiated. If politicians like Sen. Corker, Rep. DesJarlais and Gov. Haslam’s friend Mitt Romney had been in charge, there would be no American auto industry and Spring Hill would be a ghost town.

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GM to Make Cars at Spring Hill Plant Again (& Sen. Corker booed)

(Note: Updates, expands earlier post)
SPRING HILL, Tenn. (AP) — General Motors announced Monday it will start building the Chevrolet Equinox at its idled Tennessee plant and will also make midsized vehicles there in the future.
Monday’s announcement of a total $244 million investment over two phases is projected to create nearly 1,900 jobs at the former Saturn plant outside Nashville.
The automaker said it initially will invest $61 million and create nearly about 700 jobs to begin making the Equinox by the second half of 2012. Sales of the crossover are up 45 percent this year to more than 162,000, according to Autodata Corp.
An additional $183 million to make unspecified midsized vehicles for the 2015 model year is projected to create another 1,200 jobs. GM officials wouldn’t divulge more specifics.
“We don’t like to tip our hand to the competition,” said Cathy Clegg, GM’s vice president for labor relations.

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Miscellaneous TN News Notes. 9/17/11

GM To Reopen Spring Hill Plant
DETROIT (AP) — As part of a tentative agreement reached with the United Auto Workers, GM will reopen its idled assembly line at its plant in Spring Hill, officials said late Friday.
Details weren’t immediately released, but the union said the contract will ensure that laid-off workers will be hired back.
The union said the contract also will improve health-care benefits and profit-sharing plans.
Ketron Honored for Hearing Aid Bill
Families of children who needed access to affordable hearing aids will honor state Sen. Bill Ketron Sept. 21, reports the Daily News Journal.
Families and many statewide agencies, including the host of the event, the Tennessee Disability Coalition, labored in support of this legislation. The event was organized to show their appreciation for Ketron’s leadership in passing hearing aid coverage for children, which was signed into law by Gov. Bill Haslam in May.
Mayor to Maintain Dual Role
While there may be some sentiment in Arlington against Mayor-elect Mike Wissman serving as the town’s leader and on the county school board, there apparently is nothing in the suburb’s rules to prohibit the dual role, according to the Commercial Appeal.
Wissman defeated three other candidates in Thursday’s election to replace Russell Wiseman as Arlington’s mayor. The question of Wissman serving on the school board and as the town’s leader emerged as a campaign issue in the closing weeks.
The mayor-elect has pledged to keep both seats for Arlington to have an inside view along the consolidated school district path. He also wants to prevent the County Commission from appointing someone if he steps down.

The state Supreme Court has thrown out a lawsuit from a man demoted from department chair at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga to tenured professor, reports the Chattanooga TFP
.
According to the Supreme Court ruling, William Harman, then chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion, was demoted in 2008 after refusing to change his evaluation of an assistant professor.
In a review, Harman had said Talia Welsh’s was unprofessional, citing an extramarital affair with an undergraduate student, falsified reports and lies about papers she said she had published.
Dean Herbert Burhenn, Harman’s boss, told him to remove the negative review, and when Harman refused, Burhenn demoted him.
Tennessee’s whistleblower law protects employees from being fired if they refuse to perform illegal activities. Because Harman wasn’t fired, the Supreme Court ruled that he was not protected.

Cumberland Board Members Quit
Four of the five members on Cumberland County’s Health and Safety Standards Board, which deals with abandoned or neglected properties, have resigned in a dispute with the county commission, reports the Crossville Chronicle.
The members resigned after several county commissioners attended the meeting and at least three of them questioned committee members regarding operations, cases they were discussing and the procedures of the committee.
John Kinnunen, who served as chairman of the Health and Safety Standards Board said, “It was obvious that the underlying cause of the questioning was to eliminate the committee and save the county the $9,500 a year (budgeted) for the board. They feel they can pass the problems on to the Environmental Committee. It’s obvious they want to keep the county in the past and not progress into the future and to let people do whatever they want on their property and feel there is no need for the committee … We just decided that they were so adamant in their feelings that there was no reason for us to continue due to the lack of support from those commissioners. It was obvious they would continue criticizing whatever we do as a board in the future, so we resigned.”

Acquittal in Blog-inspired Assault Case
An assault case sparked by accusations of insults on a Loudon County blog ended in a not-guilty verdict for a Tellico Village resident, reports the News Sentinel.
Angelo Paul Leone, 69 was found not guilty of assaulting Tellico Village General Manager Winston Blazer during an August 21, 2009 incident at the Property Owners Association offices.
Leone — who feels he was harassed in the days before his arrest because he was among a group of residents who requested documents related to the management of the POA. — said he deserves an apology for being wrongly accused.
“It’s terrible, what they tried to do to me,” Leone said.

The assault charge grew out of a confrontation between Leone and Blazer over what Leone calls “the most vile and disgusting” defamations on a local Tellico Village blog known as Topix. The posts referenced Leone’s intentions to run for the board and also made references to his wife that he said were “of a sexual nature.”

Another Round of Talks Over Spring Hill Plant

By Erik Schelzig, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Gov. Bill Haslam’s office confirmed Thursday that the state is in talks with General Motors to expand production at the automaker’s Tennessee plant.
The state’s economic development chief, Bill Hagerty, was in Detroit to meet with GM officials, as were mayors representing communities surrounding the Spring Hill plant that stopped assembling the Chevrolet Traverse in 2009.
“We’ve been having conversations with GM and local officials,” Haslam spokesman David Smith said in an email to The Associated Press. “We’ve heard from the company that the primary factor is a question of vehicle demand increasing rather than incentives.”
More than 2,000 workers were idled at the plant south of Nashville when production of the Traverse as shifted to Michigan. But it has continued to build engines, and GM last year announced a nearly $500 million investment to manufacture the next generation of the company’s Ecotec engine at the complex.

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