Tag Archives: SCORE

SCORE Poll Finds Tennesseans Like ‘Common Core’

A poll conducted by the State Collaborative on Reforming Education, or SCORE, found there is strong support for the implementation of the state’s Common Core State Standards and that awareness of the new standards continues to grow, according to the News Sentinel.
Last school year, districts across Tennessee began implementing the standards, which are a more rigorous and detailed way of teaching to help students be better prepared for college and the workforce. Forty-six states have adopted the new standards.
….SCORE’s poll, which surveyed 500 registered voters statewide, was conducted by Public Opinion Strategies and Greenberg, Quinlan, Rosner Research on May 6, May 7 and May 9. The agency conducted a similar survey in the fall of 2012.
Results of this year’s poll found that after hearing a brief description about the standards, about 76 percent of voters support their implementation, with 44 percent “strongly” favoring them.
A total of 15 percent of voters were either “somewhat” or “strongly” opposed to their implementation.
Of those surveyed, 80 percent of voters, who had some knowledge of Common Core, said that “educational standards of public school will be either raised by the Common Core (39 percent) or stay about the same (41 percent). Only 14 percent of voters expect the Common Core will lower standards.”
Knox County Schools Superintendent Jim McIntyre said the poll was important because there has been some “misinformation” in the public about the standards.
“Getting a sense of where Tennesseans stand on these new higher standards is important to be able to move forward,” he said. “It tells me that the efforts to provide information and educate the public on the benefits of Common Core, those efforts are paying off and that message is being heard. I think that’s a really positive development.”

SCORE Hires AP News Editor, Copper Hill Principal

News release from SCORE:
(Nashville) – The State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE) announced today that Dr. Jared Bigham will join the organization as Director of College and Career Readiness and Teresa Wasson will join the organization as Deputy Director of Communications. Bigham and Wasson will enhance the organization’s college and career-readiness work, communicating about and advocating for Tennessee’s efforts to ensure that all students graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary education and the workforce.
“Jared and Teresa are leaders in the field of education and journalism respectively,” said Jamie Woodson, President and CEO of SCORE. “Jared is recognized as one of Tennessee rising stars in public education, and his experience as a teacher, school leader, and advocate will significantly advance SCORE’s efforts to engage and inform citizens about our state’s work to raise academic expectations for students. Teresa is one of Tennessee’s most respected journalists. Her vast experience as a writer, journalist, and editor will benefit not only SCORE and the entire education reform community, but most importantly, students throughout our great state.”

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Dept. of Ed Eyeing Teacher Evaluation Changes

By Lucas Johnson, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Tennessee education officials are considering changes around some of the same areas identified in a recent study requested by the governor, the education commissioner said Thursday.
Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman spoke to reporters before speaking at a summit for elementary school teachers at the Legislative Plaza.
Earlier this week, the State Collaborative on Reforming Education, or SCORE, released its study, which addressed educators’ concerns about student testing data.
The report said about two-thirds of the state’s teachers should be allowed to opt for a smaller portion of their evaluations to be based on such data.
Fifty percent of teachers’ evaluations are based on student testing data, but only about one-third teach subjects where value-added testing data is collected. The SCORE report recommends that teachers in subjects or grades without specific testing data be allowed to reduce that component to 25 percent of their evaluation.

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SCORE Report: The AP Story

By Erik Schelzig, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — About two-thirds of Tennessee teachers should be allowed to opt for a smaller portion of their evaluations to be based on student testing data, according to a study released Monday.
The report by the State Collaborative on Reforming Education, or SCORE, was commissioned by Gov. Bill Haslam to review the state’s new teacher evaluation system. The Republican governor asked lawmakers not to enact any changes to the system while the study was being conducted.
Fifty percent of teachers’ evaluations are based on student testing data, but only about one-third teach subjects where value-added testing data is collected. The SCORE report recommends that teachers in subjects or grades without specific testing data be allowed to reduce that component to 25 percent of their evaluation.
The recommendation seeks to address concerns raised repeatedly by teachers since the evaluation measure was first enacted as part of Tennessee’s federal Race to the Top grant application in 2010. Tennessee was one of the first two states selected for the grants.

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SCORE Report: The News Release (and link)

News release from SCORE:
(Nashville) — The State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE) today released a report, Supporting Effective Instruction in Tennessee, regarding Tennessee’s teacher evaluation system. The report follows a five-month listening and feedback process SCORE led on the evaluation system to identify what is working well, gather input on challenges and concerns, and report back with a range of recommendations to the Tennessee Department of Education and State Board of Education.
“SCORE’s role in this process has been to listen,” SCORE President and CEO Jamie Woodson said. “It is our hope that this report and its recommendations will build on key successes of the new teacher evaluation system and support improvements moving forward, while always keeping the focus on what it takes to improve student achievement in our state.”
Research shows that effective teaching is the most important school-based factor in improving student achievement. Tennessee is now completing the first year of implementing a new teacher evaluation system, designed to identify and support effective teaching.

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SCORE: Teachers Concerned Over Evaluating Without Data

By Lucas Johnson, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The head of an education foundation commissioned by Gov. Bill Haslam to review Tennessee’s new teacher evaluation system says it has identified a key concern teachers have about the testing data used to evaluate them and will propose recommendations to address it.
Former state Sen. Jamie Woodson, a Knoxville Republican, met with The Associated Press late last week to discuss the report to be released on Monday by the State Collaborative on Reforming Education, or SCORE, which was launched by former U.S. Sen. Bill Frist.
Haslam announced in December that he was commissioning an outside review to help “separate the anecdotes from flaws” in the new system, which has been heavily criticized by educators and lawmakers — Democrats and Republicans. The governor, a Republican, asked the recommendations be reported back to the state this summer.
Woodson wouldn’t reveal the specific recommendations before the release of the report, but she did highlight three main concerns gathered in feedback from nine roundtables and more than 16,000 teachers and administrators who participated in a statewide questionnaire.
They are:
— The system is often viewed as overly focused on accountability and not enough on improving instruction in the classroom.
— Many teachers do not have access to high quality professional learning tied to their evaluation to help them improve their practice.
— The majority of teachers do not have individual value-added student growth data for their grades and subjects.

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A Poor SCORE on Meeting Deadlines?

The education reform group charged with grading the state’s new teacher evaluation process is turning in its homework late, according to TNReport. No, the dog didn’t eat their research paper.
But the State Collaborative on Reforming Education, SCORE, wanted to take a more time collecting data, officials said.
“Frankly, it’s that we had some additional inputs from people across the state over the last few weeks,” said David Mansouri, SCORE’s spokesman. “We feel like this is a really important document, and we wanted to make sure all those inputs were included.”
The report was originally due out June 1, but Mansouri and the governor’s administration say to expect it June 11.
The report is the result of feedback from some 27,000 educators, parents and experts from the business community along with state and national education groups through online questionnaires, roundtable discussions and sit-down interviews, said Mansouri.
The results of the study touch the future of job evaluations for some 64,000 teachers and thousands of principals and education staff as state officials expect the report will drive revisions to the system going into the 2012-13 school year.

Sometimes, Jamie Woodson Enjoys a Little Horse Play

In a profile story on Jamie Woodson, Georgiana Vines reports the former state senator turned SCORE president likes hunting, fishing, mentoring youngsters and, perhaps most notably, horses.
“I can’t tell you the hundreds of times I have balanced out a weighty decision I had to make while grooming a horse, picking out stalls, cleaning tack or weed-eating a fence row. Sometimes, I don’t think about a single thing. I just enjoy the sight, the smells and the sounds of horses and the labor that it takes to tend to them properly,” the 40-year-old said.
…While she lived in Sequoyah Hills, she kept a thoroughbred horse, Mikey, in Jefferson County (which became part of her state House district through redistricting, prompting some concern over winning against a Jefferson County opponent.)
She won her first blue ribbon in a horse show at River Glen in Jefferson County — a win she parlayed into winning the election. In the Republican primary she beat Craig Kisabeth, a formern football coach, and was the winner since no Democrat ran.
…During the time she served in the state House and Senate, Woodson also was general counsel for Camel Manufacturing in Campbell County. April Harris, Camel’s CEO, said she got to know Woodson when they both rode horses at Penrose Farm. Harris’ daughter, Sommerville, rode ponies there along with her friends.
“Jamie would take the pony club girls out to lunch during the day. My daughter would come back and tell me about Jamie. That’s how I met her, encouraging girls to be all they could be,” she said.

Woodson Has $127K in Political Account, No Plans to Use It

From the News Sentinel:
A review of state campaign finance disclosures shows former Sen. Jamie Woodson, the Knoxville Republican who was speaker pro tempore until resigning July 7, has $127,564 in her campaign account.
Woodson, now the CEO of the State Collaborative on Reforming Education, or SCORE, a statewide education reform organization, said Wednesday that she has no plans for the account.
“SCORE is a nonpartisan organization. It is important to me as well as SCORE’s board that we fully commit to that nonpartisan nature. I do not have any specific plans for the account, and am not contributing to candidates for public office,” Woodson said.
Drew Rawlins, executive director of the state Bureau of Ethics and Campaign Finance, said Woodson has several choices under the law for the money.
She can make contributions to her political party, charities, candidates, existing scholarship funds or form a political action committee and put the money there or contribute to an existing PAC, he said.

More on Evaluating Teacher Evaluations

Gov. Bill Haslam called Wednesday for a new study of the state’s new teacher evaluation system, the source of multiple complaints from educators, before any changes are made by the state Legislature.
In a news conference, Haslam said an “independent review” would be conducted by the State Collaborative on Reforming Education (SCORE), which will “separate the anecdotes from the flaws” and report back June 1. Legislative leaders expect the 2012 legislative session to be finished by then.
SCORE President Jamie Woodson, a former Republican state senator from Knoxville, said the “independent, non-profit, non-partisan organization” would cover costs of the review and make recommendations for change after gathering “robust feedback” from all interested parties.
Haslam said SCORE has a record of supporting strong teacher evaluations and that should be a starting point for a review, which would focus on “is what we have working well.”
Note: Haslam news release and a statement from Fitzhugh posted HERE.

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