Tag Archives: rice

Convicted Nuclear Protesters Must Stay in Jail (for now)

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — An elderly nun and two other nuclear protesters asked Thursday to be released from jail as they await sentencing for breaking into the Y-12 National Security Complex and defacing the walls of a uranium processing plant.
A judge could rule on that next week, but on Thursday said they will have to stay in jail at least until then.
Sister Megan Rice, 83, Michael Walli and Greg Boertje-Obed (bohr-CHEE’ OH-bed’) were convicted Wednesday of interfering with national security and damaging federal property during last year’s incursion. They cut through security fences, hung banners, strung crime-scene tape and hammered off a small chunk of the fortress-like Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility inside the most secure part of the complex.
The break-in caused a temporary shutdown at the facility and a change in security contractors. But jurors weren’t swayed by the defense argument that the protesters actually aided national security by exposing flaws at the facility.
The trio appeared in court Thursday in handcuffs and leg irons seeking their release until their Sept. 23 sentencing. At one point, defense attorney Francis Lloyd asked U.S. District Judge Amul Thapar for permission to put his jacket over Rice’s shoulders, saying that the nun was chilly. The judge allowed it.
Prosecutor Jeff Theodore said the government opposes the trio’s release, noting that they testified during trial that they felt no remorse for their actions.
Defense attorney Bill Quigley argued that the defendants had refrained from any more incursions between when they were arrested in July and went to trial this week.
“The give their word not to engage in that kind of activity pending sentencing,” he said.
The three could get up to 20 years on the national security count, which they have asked Thapar to throw out on grounds of insufficient evidence. Thapar set July 29 as the deadline for legal filings on that motion.

On Senate District 8 and a Campaign Relationship

The four-candidate race in Senate District has been reviews Hank Hayes. An excerpt.
Jackson, meanwhile, is hoping her name identification in Hawkins County
— the district’s largest county in population — will push her ahead,
although she finished third in the 2010 GOP Primary for the county
mayor’s race.
“I have put out more than 1,000 signs…I’m running a retail campaign,
going door-to-door and seeing people face to face,” said Jackson, a Realtor.
Rice, however, takes issue with Jackson’s connection to former state
Agriculture Commissioner Ken Givens, a Rogersville Democrat.
“I signed her (nominating) petition; (but) I told her that after quite a
bit of encouragement from the leadership of the Republican Party in our
district (and beyond ), that I had also decided to run for the state
Senate seat,” Rice said in an e-mail. “She stood up and looked extremely
upset; then told me that Ken Givens was going to be able to raise quite
a bit of ($249,000) money for her and that I couldn’t raise near that
much and that (Givens) could get Democrats to cross over and vote in the
Republican Primary.”
In response to Rice’s e-mail, Jackson said: “I did not say anything like
that….We didn’t discuss anything about money. He must have a bad
memory or he is not telling the truth.”
Givens, a former state representative and a widower, acknowledged he’s
in a relationship with Jackson.
“When she announced she was running for state Senate, I would think that
most people would understand that someone seeing someone would probably
support them,” Givens explained. “…If I’m from Hawkins County, it
would only make sense that I would want somebody from Hawkins County
whether I was seeing Cynthia or not…I’m not ashamed or timid that I
would back a Hawkins Countian…I don’t have any plan to go after
Democrat votes. That’s something people decide for themselves.”
Aside from attacking Jackson, Rice said he’s focusing on jobs and
education in his campaign appearances.


Note: The full article is below.

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Of Horse Slaughter, Deer, Milk and Senate District 8 Campaign

Horse slaughter, deer farming and raw milk sales might be ignored in most political campaigns, but not in this summer’s four-candidate, six-county Republican primary race that will decide who succeeds retiring state Sen. Mike Faulk.
“The horse is a very intelligent animal. In my personal opinion and the opinion of humane societies I’ve talked with, we don’t need to be killing them for human consumption,” said candidate Jeff Brantley of Sharp’s Chapel. “What’s next? Dogs and cats?”
Candidate Frank Niceley of Strawberry Plains, as a state representative, has pushed legislation that would clear the way for operation of horse slaughter facilities. The bills have failed.
He has also unsuccessfully sponsored legislation that would legalize keeping whitetail deer in captivity and selling them — an idea Brantley said he also opposes.
Critics say such a move would raise the risk of Tennessee’s native whitetails becoming infected with illnesses brought in by imported, domesticated deer, including chronic wasting disease. Proponents say such concerns are mistaken and deer farming would be a new source of income in rural counties.

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Fundraising Rice Draws a Few Occupy Nashville Protesters

Condoleezza Rice appeared at a fundraiser in Nashville for U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn on Monday, and members of the Occupy Nashville protests took notice, according to TNReport.
A group of about 12 of the protesters moved from War Memorial Plaza to the area of the Hermitage Hotel nearby where Rice, former U.S. secretary of state and national security adviser, was featured at a midday gathering in the ballroom.
One of the protesters said he began on the sidewalk on the side of the street where the hotel is but was asked by security to move. The group then protested across the street. Inside the hotel, a campaign spokeswoman confirmed that Rice was at the event but that no media were allowed.
“The people or the profits,” the protesters chanted. “We are the 99 percent.” A few of the protesters were asked to explain what exactly their reason was for protesting Rice.
“Condoleezza Rice has definitely become part of the 1 percent. I’m a representative of the 99 percent, the people,” said Joshua Bible Dufour, who said he is from Long Beach, Calif., and is passing through Nashville, spending four days in the state capital
.