Tag Archives: qualifying

No Democrat Qualifies to Replace Breeding in House District 89

The deadline to replace Shelly Breeding as a candidate for the Democratic nomination in Knox County’s House District 89 passed at noon Saturday with no petition filed, according to Cliff Rodgers, Knox County administrator of elections.
Further from the News-Sentinel:
Would-be Democratic candidate Breeding lost a court bid to be on the ballot after a chancellor ruled her house actually sits in Anderson County and not Knox County. The new district is wholly in Knox County.
The Tennessee Court of Appeals upheld the decision, and the Tennessee Supreme Court declined to review it.
Four candidates are running the GOP primary in August.
According to Mark Goins, coordinator with the state Division of Elections, the Knox County Election Commission must now transfer the voter registration of Breeding, her husband and other voters similarly situated on Elizabeth Downs Lane to the Anderson County Election Commission.
“We didn’t purge anyone and say, ‘You’ve got to register in another county. We hand-delivered (the registrations) over there yesterday so there wouldn’t be any problem,” Rodgers said today. “We wanted to be sure they had an easy transition.”
Rodgers said the move affects two households in addition to Breeding’s home, for a total of seven voters.
Rodgers said the last day to register to vote for the Aug. 2 election is July 3 and early voting begins July 13. Tennessee law has changed and now voters 60 years of age or older may vote absentee by mail for any reason, Rodgers said.

Note: Under state law, when a candidate is taken off the ballot after the regular qualifying deadline — whether for death, disability or some legal reason, as in this case — qualifying is reopened. The deadline for new petitions to be filed is 40 days before the election and this year the 40th day before the Aug. 2 primary election fell on Saturday.
After the regular qualifying deadline, there were 34 House seats guaranteed to Republicans in November because there is no Democrat on the ballot. With Breeding disqualified and no replacement named, there are now 35.

Knox Election Commission Asks Court to Decided Breeding Issue

The Knox County Election Commission voted today to ask a court to decide the residency issue of Democrat legislative hopeful Shelley Breeding.
Breeding, who has filed to run in the newly formed 89th state House district, said she was not surprised at the commission’s ruling.
“It’s not the worst thing, though,” she said, adding that she felt comfortable with having a court decide.
“I think the law is strongly on our side,” she said.
Knox County Law Director Joe Jarrett said the petition for a declaratory judgment could be filed in Chancery Court as early as today, or Friday at the latest. Work had already started because he anticipated the ruling, he said.
The 89th district lies entirely in Knox County. Part of Breeding’s property, including her driveway and mailbox with a Knoxville address, is in Knox County, but her house lies in Anderson County, which collects her property tax.
Her lawyer Bill Stokes, is a Republican and former county GOP chair. He said Breeding meets a number of other criteria that qualify her to run as a candidate from Knox County.
“She is a bona fide Knox County resident,” he said.
The commission vote was 3-to-2, along party lines, to send the matter directly to court instead of voting on her candidacy. State election officials earlier advised the Knox County Election Commission to send the matter straight to court, since it was likely to land there anyway.
(Note: from Jim Balloch of the News Sentinel)

Candidate Qualifying Lineup Leaves GOP Positions for Total Legislative Control

Passage of the qualifying deadline for legislative candidates last week leaves Republicans well-positioned to achieving their goal of making Democrats politically irrelevant in the 108th General Assembly that convenes next year.
In part, that’s because 11 incumbent Democrats — seven representatives and four senators — are voluntarily not seeking re-election.
At least four more incumbent Democrats — three representatives and one senator — are certain to be ousted later because of Republican-controlled redistricting leaves incumbents running against one another in the same district.
In part, the GOP advantage also rests with money. Financial disclosures filed earlier this year showed Republicans holding an advantage of more than $3 to $1 in cash on hand for spending on legislative races — about $3.2 million for Republicans versus $770,000 for Democrats.
The uphill road faced by Democrats in just maintaining their status quo as a sometimes influential minority becomes apparent through an analysis of the candidate lineup for this year’s campaigns after the qualifying deadline passed on Thursday.
Basically, it shows Republicans already are certain to have a majority again next year in both chambers and have a head start toward further eroding Democrats’ waning strength. Republicans need to gain just two seats in the House and two seats in the Senate to have a two-thirds majority in both chambers, a standard that means that all Democrats could boycott a session and the GOP would still have a quorum to continue legislating.
A two-thirds majority would also mean unified Republicans can suspend normal procedural rules to take up any legislation and push it through almost instantly.

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Kent Williams Collects Papers to Run as Republican (and independent)

State Rep. Kent Williams, the Legislature’s only political independent after being banished from the Republican party in 2009, has picked up papers from the Carter County Election Commission for qualifying as both an independent and as a Republican in this year’s elections.
The state GOP declared that Williams could not run as a Republican after he joined with House Democrats to elect himself as House speaker. He was replaced as House speaker in 2011 by Beth Harwell after Republicans gained a bigger majority in the 2010 elections.
Williams, who calls himself a “Carter County Republican,” said he is exploring options. But Nickas said Wednesday that the Republican State Executive Committee would have to approve Williams readmission to the party and, “It would be my guess he would find the door still shut.”
The deadline for filing as a candidate for legislative office is April 5.