Tag Archives: program

Rural Counties Tire of TN Tire Disposal Program

A handful of Tennessee counties are fed up with the state’s scrap tire disposal program and have opted not to take state reimbursements for collecting tires to be hauled off and recycled, reports The Tennessean.
The problems seems to be that the state’s present tire disposal tax of $1.35 per tire provides enough money to cover costs – and even provide a profit – for regular car tires. But when a county takes in a bunch of bigger tires from trucks, tractors and heavy equipment, it loses money.
A task force that studied the issue decided there should be bigger fees for bigger tires, but backed off of pushing the idea because of fears the Legislature wouldn’t go along, the story indicates. (It could be considered a t ax increase, of course.)
There are moves to get out of the state program in Cheatham, Fayette and Gibson counties.
Officials in an additional 44 counties, including Davidson, Robertson, Williamson and Wilson, are trying to gauge whether their expenses will be covered under a new reimbursement rate. Also uncertain, officials said, is whether the changes will spur more illegal tire dumping.
….The government got involved in tire recycling with passage of the Solid Waste Management Act of 1991, which banned whole tires from landfills and required counties to create tire collection sites.
For counties still working with the state, the waste tire program works like this: Consumers pay a tire disposal fee of $1.35 on each newly purchased tire. Tire dealers keep 10 cents for processing and send $1.25 to the state. They also take the consumer’s old tires to a collection site. The county then weighs and counts the tires, reports that number to the state and pays a recycling company, by the ton, to haul the tires away for recycling. Later, the state sends a $1 reimbursement to the county for each recycled tire.
For 44 counties that recently renewed their state reimbursement contracts, the $1 payback is new since July 1. Before then, the state reimbursed counties at $70 per ton.

New Program Lets Those on Parole Report Via Computer Call

The state Tennessee Board of Probation and Parole has a new supervisory system in which criminal offenders are allowed to make a monthly call to a computerized telephone menu instead of dealing directly with a parole officer, reports The Tennessean.
It’s intended to alleviate crushing caseloads that have hurt the agency’s ability to supervise criminals
The agency says the system is designed for offenders deemed a low risk and who have consistently met their obligations to the state. Nine percent of the offenders on this phone-in system in Davidson County — 42 out of 479 offenders — are murderers, according to June data obtained by The Tennessean.
An additional five offenders were convicted of attempted murder, and 51 were convicted of robbery.
The Board of Probation and Parole declined multiple requests to interview staff and Chairman Charles Traughber about the Interactive Offender Tracking.

As an example of an offender in the program, the newspaper cites Anthony Ussery, 30.
He was convicted of manslaughter in the shooting death of a man in a Nashville Kroger parking lot, beating an ex-girlfriend and possessing cocaine. And, when released on parole, he was arrested at least six times in his first 2½ years of supervision

UT Closes Infant Mortality Program With Audit Underway

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The University of Tennessee has halted programs in Memphis and Chattanooga aimed at reducing infant mortality rates amid an internal audit.
The Memphis program, called The Blues Project, was started seven years ago by the UT Health Science Center to address the city’s high death rate among infants. There are about 100 women and teenagers currently enrolled in the program, which has aided about 1,000 people to date, according to The Commercial Appeal.
It was expanded to Chattanooga, which also has a high infant mortality rate, last year with a $1.7 million grant from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation.
Kimberly Lamar directs the Memphis program and says she didn’t know about its suspension until a health clinic called her Monday. Pregnant teens and women continued showing up at local health clinics Monday, but were turned away.
“If they cared about these women, they wouldn’t have just terminated services immediately,” Lamar said. “What about these moms? What about these babies?
“Some of these women have domestic-violence issues,” Lamar added. “They depend on my staff.”
UT Health Science Center spokeswoman Sheila Champlin confirmed the program suspension, calling it regrettable but unavoidable.
“It’s really to preserve the scientific integrity of the study and to answer questions about the execution of the study,” Champlin said.
The program provided education, counseling and support to pregnant teens, mothers and fathers. It helped expectant mothers reduce stress, access prenatal care and become independent.
The program also referred women to other community resources for problems such as domestic violence and depression. Its workers followed mothers from pregnancy until children reached age 2.