Tag Archives: production

State to Pay $13 Million to Keep ‘Nashville’ Filming in Nashville

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development has approved a grant of up to $12.5 million to support the local production of ABC’s Nashville, reports The City Paper.
Mayor Karl Dean has also agreed, on behalf of Metro, to provide a $500,000 cash grant for the production of the show, something that Dean’s office has previously referred to as advertising the city can’t buy.
There had been speculation about the possibility of the show leaving Nashville for its second season, but ABC confirmed last week that the show would remain in its title city.
“Nashville offers a valuable international platform to showcase our state’s dynamic entertainment industry, while providing a confluence of film and music that is unique only to Tennessee,” ECD Commissioner Bill Hagerty said in a release from the department. “Promoting and assisting this thriving business sector is an integral part of our state’s economic development efforts. From our rich musical heritage to our talented artists and crew, Tennessee’s entertainment industry is second to none. I am pleased Nashville producers recognize the value of filming in Music City, and I look forward to another great season.”
ECD noted that the grant will be based on “qualified expenditures,” defined as “those incurred in the state for goods or services purchased from a Tennessee vendor or paid to a Tennessee resident in connection with the production.”
The Nashville Convention & Visitors Corp. and the Event Marketing Fund will each contribute a cash grant of $125,000. The production is expected to generate more than $40 million in local spending, according to ECD.
“Small and large Nashville businesses have benefited greatly from the local filming of Nashville, not only from the direct spending related to the show but also from the worldwide attention this show has generated for our city and our state. With beautiful scenic shots of our landscape and the portrayal of our unique music scene, more people, without a doubt, are visiting our city and spending their money here because they’ve seen this hour-long commercial for Music City that airs every week during primetime,” said Dean, in a prepared statement. “The city’s investment in Nashville this season is a recognition that this show benefits our local economy and is opening doors to further grow the film and television industry here.”

State Will Pay Up to $7.5 Million for a TV Show About Nashville

News release from Department of Economic and Community Development:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (ECD) announced today that it has approved a grant of up to $7.5 million for the “Nashville” television show that will film in Music City and premier on ABC this fall.
The reimbursable grant will be based on the production’s actual qualified expenditures made in Tennessee. Qualified expenditures are those incurred in the state for goods or services purchased from a Tennessee vendor or paid to a Tennessee resident in connection with the production.
“We are taking a new approach to one of Tennessee’s strongest and most unique businesses, the entertainment industry,” Commissioner Bill Hagerty, Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development, said. “Gov. Bill Haslam has made a concerted effort to fold the film and music sectors into our department and make them a part of the state’s regular economic goals and initiatives.
“The unique confluence of film and music that ‘Nashville’ offers is central to our aim of highlighting Tennessee’s great strength as a center of creative excellence in the music industry,” Hagerty added. “Additionally, the consistent employment afforded Tennesseans as a result of this multi-episode series will result in constructive training and talent development and longer term employment for Tennessee’s entertainment industry.”
Pre-production on the series, which will be filmed in and around Nashville, has already begun with principal photography slated to begin mid-July. “Nashville” is expected to employ more than 350 Tennessee residents in various crew positions. Additionally, much of the musical scoring, recording and publishing will be done in Music City.
“Nashville” stars Connie Britton (“Friday Night Lights,” “American Horror Story”) as Rayna James, a country music legend, and Hayden Panettiere (“Heroes”) as Juliette Barnes, a young up-and-coming star. Also starring in the series are Powers Boothe (“MacGruber,” “24”), Eric Close (“Chaos,” “Without a Trace”) and Clare Bowen (“General Hospital”).
The series is produced by Lionsgate, ABC Studios and Gaylord Entertainment. For more information on the show, visit www.facebook.com/NashvilleABC

Budgeting Decisions: Filmkakers vs. Child Abuse?

The Tennessean has a couple of interesting stories on state budget issues that, perhaps, present a bit of a contrast.
One features entertainment industry folks lamenting that the state doesn’t give away enough incentive money to movie producers so that they are enticed to film in Tennessee.
Even as states like Louisiana, Georgia and North Carolina sweeten the pot for filmmakers, Tennessee’s film fund, along with proposed legislation to expand incentives, is not gathering steam under Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration…. Whereas other states cover up to 30 percent of an in-state film’s production, sometimes without spending limits, Tennessee offers filmmakers a 17 percent production discount.
The other features concerns over the pending end to funding for Healthy Start, a program that aims to prevent child abuse and neglect in enrolled families.
The state spends a little over $3 million a year on the program, which is funded through DCS and administered by the state Health Department. There are eight community-based agencies throughout the state, including Middle Tennessee sites in Nashville and Shelbyville.
The Metro Public Health Department serves about 160 to 180 families in the program annually and has seen significant outcomes, said Dr. Kimberlee Wyche-Etheridge, director of the Family Youth and Infant Health Bureau. Families stay in the program for three to five years and are offered services to improve parent-child interaction and decrease dependency on public assistance, among other things.
“It’s not a quick fix of one or two home visits, but it’s a long-term commitment to a family to get them in a place where the child’s well-being is optimized,” she said.

Note: The Haslam administration is opposing both new handouts to the film industry and renewed funding for Healthy Start.