Tag Archives: preservation

TDOT Gets Pavement Preservation Award

News release from Tennessee Department of Transportation:
Nashville, TN -The Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) has been chosen to receive the 2011 James B. Sorenson Excellence in Pavement Preservation Award. This national award focuses on pavement preservation programs and is given annually by the Foundation for Pavement Preservation, Inc., a non-profit trade association that works in close cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and others promoting the importance of protecting and preserving investments in pavement infrastructure.
TDOT Commissioner John Schroer will accept the award Wednesday, August 29th, 2012 at 12:45 p.m. at the National Pavement Preservation Conference held at the Renaissance Hotel in downtown Nashville.
TDOT is being recognized because of its outstanding support and for the implementation of a Pavement Preservation program. The program enables the department to develop cost-effective strategies for maintaining each state owned roadway while maximizing the state’s investment in Tennessee’s entire transportation system. With future budget challenges and increasing materials costs, this approach has become critical in stretching available resources.
“Through this program, TDOT has consistently kept our roadways in the top five in the nation while saving taxpayer dollars,” said Commissioner John Schroer. “It is my goal that we constantly work to improve this program and seek additional ways to maximize our effectiveness and efficiency.”
Pavement preservation include techniques such as sealing cracks that develop in pavement before further asphalt damage occurs and changing hot mix asphalt specifications. TDOT will continue to work closely with the FHWA and the Tennessee General Assembly to gain additional funding dedicated to pavement preservation.
Media is invited to see an array of pavement preservation demonstrations showcasing various techniques used across the country. This is a unique opportunity to see many different paving techniques used to save money and stretch tax dollars on Tennessee roads.

28 Historic Preservation Grants Listed

News release from governor’s office:
NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and the Tennessee Historical Commission today announced 28 grants to support the preservation of historic and archaeological sites, districts and structures.
“History becomes real when you visit these sites, and it matters that the state helps reflect on and protects its historic places,” Haslam said. “Today’s announcement represents more than $600,000 in assistance to communities across the state, ensuring that Tennessee’s rich history will continue to be shared with future generations.”
This year’s selection process emphasized projects conducting architectural, archaeological and historic site surveys. Such projects are designed to identify and to record historic districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects built before 1960 that are significant to Tennessee’s history.

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TDOT Achieves ‘Excellence in Pavement Preservation’

News release from Department of Transportation:
Nashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) has been awarded the 2011 James B. Sorenson Excellence in Pavement Preservation Award. This national award focuses on pavement preservation programs and is given annually by the Foundation for Pavement Preservation, Inc., a non-profit trade association that works in close cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and others promoting the importance of protecting and preserving investments in pavement infrastructure.
TDOT was recognized because of its outstanding support and for the implementation of a Pavement Preservation Program. The program enables the department to develop cost-effective strategies for maintaining each state owned roadway while maximizing the state’s investment in Tennessee’s entire transportation system. With future budget challenges and increasing materials costs, this approach has become critical in stretching available resources.
“Through this program, TDOT has consistently kept our roadways in the top five in the nation while saving taxpayer dollars,” said Commissioner John Schroer. “It is our goal that we constantly work to improve this program and seek additional ways to maximize our effectiveness and efficiency.”
Pavement preservation include techniques such as sealing cracks that develop in pavement before further asphalt damage occurs and changing hot mix asphalt specifications. TDOT will continue to work closely with the FHWA and the Tennessee General Assembly to gain additional funding dedicated to pavement preservation.

Education Reform. Tort Reform and now… Burial Reform (with a task force)

The Cemetery Task Force of the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance has been studying Tennessee’s burial laws and has decided they should be changed, according to the News Sentinel.
“There’s not a clear process for dealing with cemeteries,” said (archaeologist Patrick) Garrow, who was involved in revising Georgia’s cemetery laws.
With help from Garrow, the task force came up with three main goals to improve the preservation of cemeteries and the amount of information stored about each one.
The first goal is to address cemetery relocations.
“Right now in Tennessee, it’s easy for a property owner or developer to move them,” said Garlington.
According to ETPA, state laws offer very little guidance for properly moving cemeteries.
“They eventually become abandoned cemeteries,” Garrow said, “Families move on, and graves are forgotten.”
The second goal is to control the amount of new cemeteries and private burial plots created. Many counties allow citizens to bury loved ones on family land.
“It’s nearly impossible to keep up with it. We believe that there should be a statewide database of cemeteries,” said Garlington, “We can’t save or preserve places until we know what’s out there.
The last goal the task force has decided upon is establishment of a database of names and locations for the public to access. The information would help not only family but researchers and preservation groups.
“Ultimately our goal is to update the state burial law. This is the beginning of that process,” Garlington said.

Civil War Ferry Site Preserved

DECATUR, Tenn. (AP) — Owners of a farm beside a Civil War ferry site on the Tennessee River have agreed to conserve 152 acres in a permanent conservation agreement.
The Land Trust for Tennessee announced Thursday that the owners of the Meigs County property, David and Verlinda Waters, have agreed to preserve their River Ridge Farm property that includes more than 2,000 feet of riverfront. It is adjacent to Washington Ferry, which is on the National Register of Historic Places.
More than 160 such agreements with The Land Trust involve owner donations.
In rare cases such as River Ridge Farm, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service contributes 50 percent of the cost, or payment to the landowner.