Tag Archives: precursor

Bill Limiting Pseudoephedrine Prescriptions Dead for the Year

A bill to reduce the amount of some medications that can be sold without a prescription is dead for the year, reports the News Sentinel.
House Bill 617 would’ve reduced the amount of pseudoephedrine cold medication that can be purchased as part of the fight against meth. It unanimously passed out of a House Health Committee on Wednesday, but was stopped in the Senate when it was sent to the General Subcommittee, officials said.
State Rep. Tony Shipley, R-Kingsport, who sponsored the bill, expects it to pass the House. He said he then would most likely lay the bill on his desk until the next session so the Senate can reconsider it.
“When it got parked in the Senate General Subcommittee, I almost cried,” he said. “This is the first time we’ve been able to get our hands around this.”
Meth is made using household chemicals such as drain cleaner and lantern fuel to break down pseudoephedrine, the main ingredient in some popular cold and sinus pills. The process also creates toxic waste and can cause explosions and fires. Individuals get around limits by “smurfing” or using fake identification to make multiple pseudoephedrine purchases.
Current state law allows individuals to purchase 300 pills or 12 packs with 9 grams of pseudoephedrine per month, Shipley said.
HB617 would reduce the allowable amount to 240 pills or 10 packs with 7.2 grams of pseudoephedrine per month, he said.
“That’s still a lot of pills. The average person takes less than 24 pills in a year,” he said. “We’re not inconveniencing anyone but meth dealers.”

Comptroller Issues TN Meth Report

News release from state comptroller’s office:
Methamphetamine production continues in small laboratories in Tennessee and elsewhere around the country in spite of new laws regulating and tracking the sale of pharmacy products used to manufacture the illegal drug.
That is one of the findings of a report released today by the Comptroller’s Offices of Research and Education Accountability about attempts to control access to legal products sold at pharmacies which are later used to create methamphetamine. Pseudoephedrine, the most common of the so-called “precursor” products used in manufacturing the drug, is an ingredient in many over-the-counter cold and allergy remedies. The report cautions that the relatively short history of precursor control policies and the limitations of available crime and drug use data make it difficult to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of particular precursor control laws on the production of methamphetamine in small labs.

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