Tag Archives: petitions

Libertarian Presidential Candidate Visits TN for Paperwork

Libertarian Party presidential candidate Gary Johnson came to Nashville to ensure he made the state’s ballot as an independent presidential candidate in November, including meeting one requirement that candidates sign every nominating petition his campaign submitted.
More from the Tennessean report:
Later in the day, his campaign was also getting additional petitioners to nominate him after more than half of the people who tried to nominate the former New Mexico governor were considered invalid by state election officials.
Jim Tomasik, the state director for Johnson’s campaign, said he picked up Johnson himself from the airport Wednesday morning so he could meet an obscure part of state code and sign each petition to qualify for the November election.
The afternoon before, he was told the petitions the campaign had filed were 74 signatures short of qualifying.
According to state election rules, independent Presidential candidates must have 275 signatures from registered Tennessee voters to be named on the ballot. More than half of the 415 signatures the Johnson campaign turned in earlier this month were apparently not from eligible voters.
“Over 50 percent to be rejected, that’s an awfully high margin,” Tomasik said. He quickly said it was the campaign’s responsibility to step up and get Johnson, a fiscal conservative and social liberal, on the state’s ballot.

Supreme Spokeswoman: Email Petitions Must Be Ignored

Statement from Administrative Office of the Courts:
As of this morning, the Administrative Office of the Courts has received more than 16,000 email petitions requesting the Supreme Court to stop the retrials of the four defendants charged with the murders of Channon Christian and Christopher Newsom of Knoxville, Tenn.,” said Laura Click, public information officer for the Administrative Office of the Courts.
“We certainly appreciate and understand the public’s interest in these cases, however, the Code of Judicial Conduct prevents the Supreme Court, or any judge, from considering ex parte communications as part of its decision making process. In other words, a judge cannot consider any communications made to the judge without the parties in the case being present.
“The Code of Judicial Conduct also prohibits judges from commenting on any cases that may come before them. Should the state file an appeal from the trial judge’s decision granting the motions for retrials, the appellate courts will consider the appeal based on the facts and information filed with the court as part of the regular appeals process, described in the Tennessee Rules of Appellate Procedure,” Click said.