Tag Archives: medication

Campfield Suggests Therapy to Critics; Uproar Ensues

State Sen. Stacey Campfield has suggested via email that at least three people who criticized his legislative proposals consider therapy and medication, reports Chas Sisk, and there is a national uproar in the blogosphere as a result.
“You seem to have some serious, deep anger issues,” read the identically-worded messages. “Have you ever thought about therapy? I hear they are doing some wonderful things with medications these days.”
Campfield signed the messages, “Yours in service.”
The response, which may have been sent to many more people who wrote the senator, unleashed a torrent of criticism online Friday.
Several national websites, including TMZ and Hollywood Gossip, published the reply. (Note: TMZ has audio of an interview with Campfield on the matter, HERE) A thread on Reddit, a popular social media site, had drawn more than 60 comments by Friday afternoon.
“I was utterly shocked,” said Telisha Arguelles Cobb, the Berry Hill woman whose letter appeared on Reddit.
Cobb, who used to live in the Knoxville area Campfield now represents, wrote the lawmaker to express her displeasure with his Classroom Protection Act, which would discourage classroom discussions of homosexuality, and his proposal to tie welfare benefits to children’s performance in school.
In her note, which also was published on Reddit, Cobb said Campfield was “an embarrassment to our great state” and added, “You need to search your heart, your values and your Christianity to find a better way to represent us as a whole.”
Campfield wrote back to Cobb and at least two others shortly before 12:45 p.m. Thursday using his legislative iPad. He said he did not know how many people he sent the same reply to, and he declined to discuss how identical wording came to appear in multiple messages.
But he said gay rights activists were trying to intimidate him by sending him rude emails and publicizing his reply.
“I’m not their little piƱata,” Campfield told The Tennessean on Friday. “I’m not going to put up with personal attacks.

Legislators Referee a Nurses-versus-doctors turf war

The latest effort by state legislators to referee disputes between various professional groups concerns whether nurse practitioners, physician assistants and the like can give shots of pain medication that involve an injection near the spine…. or whether a specialized, full-fledged doctor must be on hand to supervise.
So the docs have a bill (HB1896) that would make it illegal for less-qualified medical personnel to handle such a procedure. It passed the Senate earlier this year, but stalled in the House and is being studied in the off season. . TNReport and WPLN have write-ups on the turf war.
From WPLN’s Daniel Potter:
Opponents argue it’s a solution without a problem, saying there’s no evidence of harm. Sharon Adkins directs the Tennessee Nurses Association.
“The board of nursing has received no complaints against nurse practitioners who perform these procedures, nor have malpractice insurance rates raised in anyway.”
But that doesn’t mean they’re always doing as good a job as a specialized pain doctor, argues Graf Hilgenhurst, an M.D. who practices in Smyrna.
“There is a small but real risk of doing serious harm to a patient. There is a much greater risk of squandering healthcare dollars and doing no good.”
Tussles like these test the boundaries between doctors and mid-level providers, and could become more common in coming years. That’s as growing patient demand could lead more to physician assistants and nurse practitioners for care.

House Democratic Caucus Chair Mike Turner says each side is looking out for its own interest.
“We also have to decide ‘Is this a turf battle?’ Because most of the time when we see these bills they’re turf battles. And we have to decide is this a turf battle, or is this actually going to help the people of Tennessee?”
And the role of nurse practitioners and physician assistants is only growing, says Republican Matthew Hill, who chairs the House’s general subcommittee on health.
Hill says the federal healthcare overhaul will make Tennessee more reliant on such midlevel providers to offer all kinds of care. He says that means lawmakers have to make sure they’re well trained for the task.