Tag Archives: mayfield

Michael Mayfield Pleads Guilty to Vandalism

The son of a dairy executive who lost a race for Congress has pleaded guilty to slashing a tire stem on a car belonging to the incumbent congressman’s campaign manager during a campaign stop last spring, reports the News Sentinel.
Michael Mayfield, son of Scottie Mayfield, entered his plea to misdemeanor vandalism this week in Roane County General Sessions Court.
The younger Mayfield, 34, admitted slashing the stem on the rear left tire of Tyler Threadgill’s 2005 Audi during an April 24 Scottie Mayfield campaign stop at the Roane County Courthouse.
Threadgill, manager of 3rd District congressman Chuck Fleischmann’s re-election effort, had attended several of Mayfield’s campaign events.
On Monday, Michael Mayfield received a suspended 11-month, 29-day jail sentence, was granted judicial diversion and was placed on unsupervised probation.
Prosecutor Bill Reedy said that if Mayfield completes probation “on good behavior,” Mayfield can petition the court to expunge the charge from his record.
Mayfield was ordered to make $100 restitution. That sum was “an arbitrary amount we just pulled out of the air,” Reedy said. He said Threadgill wasn’t able to give a specific damage amount for the tire stem. “It wasn’t a big deal to him (Threadgill),” Reedy said.
With court costs, Mayfield will pay around $500, Reedy said.

How Fleischmann Came From 50 Points Behind to Win

Chris Carroll has an insightful look back at how incumbent Chuck Fleischmann, starting from way behind in the polls, pulled out a victory over Scottie Mayfield and Weston Wamp in the 3rd Congressional District Republican primary – even though his opponents collectively had 61 percent of the vote.
Interviews and a Chattanooga Times Free Press review of the vote count reveal that Wamp may have dumped too many resources into Hamilton County and Mayfield too few. Partly because of that, Fleischmann avoided a dubious distinction that seemed realistic a few months ago — becoming only the third Tennessee congressman since 1966 to lose a contested primary.
…Fleischmann didn’t carry a majority in a single county — Anderson County’s 49 percent was the highest he got anywhere — but Mayfield captured at least 50 percent of votes in McMinn, Monroe and Scott counties, and he easily won two more in Campbell and Polk.
Still, Hamilton County accounted for nearly half the district’s 76,000 ballots, and Mayfield came in last. He lost Hamilton County by 6,769 votes and the district by 6,172.
A week after his third-place showing where it mattered most, Mayfield was second-guessing his Chattanooga-area efforts.
“I’m going to say I probably spent time equally everywhere,” he said. “It’s just that half the voters are in Hamilton County, and so I should have spent half my time there instead of one-tenth of my time.”
…n an interview Friday, the younger Wamp cited more media outlets, more debates and more voters in explaining why he poured most of his time and money into Chattanooga with ads, appearances and interviews.
“The race was taking place in Hamilton County — that’s where people seemed to care; that’s where the media cared,” Wamp said.
But the results indicate he didn’t do enough anywhere else, specifically the seven counties in the Knoxville media market. Excluding Hamilton County, where he beat Fleischmann by 101 votes, Wamp finished third in every county and garnered 19 percent districtwide. Records show he lost Monroe and Scott counties by 5-to-1 margins and six other counties by at least 20 percentage points.
Wamp’s built-in name recognition didn’t translate in places his father never served.
…As Mayfield decided how he would spend $802,000 in campaign contributions and Wamp mulled over options for his $626,000, Fleischmann sat on $1.1 million. The difference? More than $435,000 of the congressman’s largesse came from incumbent-friendly political action committees — resources his challengers could not depend on.
…According to Fleisch-mann chief of staff Chip Saltsman, internal polling taken in early April showed Mayfield “literally up 50 points” in several counties.
“Mayfield was crushing us. Destroying us,” he said. “Basically he was the incumbent.”

Mayfield Concedes to Fleischman (‘sour grapes’ ice cream?)

Scottie Mayfield gave up the fight Friday and conceded the 3rd Congressional District Republican primary to U.S. Rep. Chuck Fleischmann, reports Chris Carroll.
“Tomorrow I’m going to get on my tractor for the first time in four months,” the runner-up said Friday. “I’m ready to get back to the old normalcy as opposed to the more recent normalcy.”
The dairy executive’s concession clears the way for Fleischmann to run against Democratic nominee Mary Headrick. Independent candidate and Army veteran Matthew Deniston also will be on the Nov. 6 general election ballot.
Mayfield phoned the freshman congressman Friday afternoon. The call came half a day after Mayfield promised Thursday night to challenge Hamilton County’s results “first thing” in the morning.
Several bleary-eyed Fleischmann staffers converged on the Hamilton County Election Commission as it opened at 8 a.m. Friday, brainstorming a response to Mayfield’s expected appearance.
“This is all about a new flavor of Mayfield ice cream — ‘Sour Grapes,'” Fleischmann Chief of Staff Chip Saltsman joked while waiting.
The aides waited for several hours, but Mayfield never showed up.
Mayfield initially declined to concede the race because, he said, private polling in recent days showed him doing much better in Hamilton County than he actually did when the votes were counted.
Weston Wamp won Hamilton County by 101 votes, and it was the only county in the district that Mayfield didn’t win or finish second. Instead he came in third, 19 percentage points and 6,000 votes behind Wamp.
Mayfield lost by a similar number of votes districtwide and declined to concede Thursday “because it sounds like someone may have made a mistake” in Hamilton County, he said
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Black, Fleischmann in Toughest TN Campaigns for Reelection to Congress

By Erik Schelzig, Associated Press
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — Freshman U.S. Reps. Diane Black and Chuck Fleischmann both boast of strong conservative records in Congress. That hasn’t stopped either from facing bruising primary challenges to their bids to return to Congress next year.
Voters go to the polls Thursday to decide whether to stick with the GOP incumbents in those races, or make a fresh start with their rivals.
Fleischmann’s challengers in the 3rd District include Scottie Mayfield, an executive with the dairy company that bears his family name, and Weston Wamp, the son of a former congressman.
In the 6th District, Black faces a rematch against Lou Ann Zelenik, whom she narrowly defeated for the nomination to the open House seat in 2010. Zelenik moved from Rutherford County to Wilson County make another run after the district’s boundaries were redrawn earlier this year.

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Anti-Mayfield Ice Cream Ad, Financed by Outside PAC, Stirs Flap

A new independent expenditure ad in the 3rd Congressional District race says Scottie Mayfield is “good at ice cream, not so good on the issues.”
Mayfield campaign consultant Tommy Hopper, a former state Republican chairman, tells Chris Carroll that he thinks the ad sponsors got that line from Chip Saltsman, another former state GOP chief who is running the Chuck Fleischman campaign.
Coordination between the PAC running the ad and the Fleischmann campaign, of course, would violate federal campaign laws. Hopper suspects that’s what happened. Saltsman says not so.
“We simply do not believe that an out-of-state PAC with no known ties to Tennessee has any interest in our primary unless led here by one of our opponents,” Hopper said.
…Bankrolled by the Beaufort, S.C.-based Citizens for a Working America, the $165,000 ad campaign is the second time an independent, out-of-state political committee has spent money on the 3rd District primary.
Airing in Chattanooga and Knoxville broadcast markets, the anti-Mayfield ad includes an instrumental version of “Pop Goes the Weasel” and melting vanilla ice cream — direct hits on the dairy executive’s intelligence and political savvy.
“Scottie Mayfield: Good at ice cream, not so good on the issues,” the ad’s narrator concludes.
Mayfield’s advisers said recent remarks offered by Fleischmann chief of staff Chip Saltsman shed doubt on the campaign’s denials.
According to audio obtained by the Chattanooga Times Free Press, Saltsman, speaking for Fleischmann at a rally last week in Campbell County, said, “good ice cream, bad politics” in a rhetorical swipe against Mayfield.
“Chip’s comments are oddly similar to the overall theme of the ad,” Hopper said in an email, “and it’s a fact that the Fleischmann campaign plays fast and loose with the law and the facts.”
Saltsman laughed when greeted with Hopper’s allegation, adding that he has no ties to Citizens for a Working America.
“Don’t know them. But I’ve heard that comment about Mayfield having good milk or ice cream and bad politics or issues 100 times,” he said. “It’s something a lot of people say. A lot of people talk about it.”
The other independent expenditure came from the American Conservative Union, a Washington, D.C.-based organization that spent at least $30,000 on a July radio buy in support of Fleischmann.
Records show OnMessage Inc., an ad agency in Virginia, produced both ads.
Saltsman and OnMessage Inc. co-founder Brad Todd are Facebook friends, but the connections go beyond that. Saltsman was elected Tennessee Republican Party chairman in 1998, and Todd was the state party’s executive director in 1997-98, according to his LinkedIn page.
Todd did not return phone calls, but Saltsman said the two briefly worked together.
“He was at the party when I was elected, but I replaced him,” Saltsman said. Saltsman denied coordination and said he hasn’t spoken with Todd “since last winter.”
Paul S. Ryan, senior counsel at the Campaign Legal Center in Washington, D.C., said it’s difficult to prove “coordination” even though the Federal Election Commission has subpoena power over such matters.
…A $475,000 ad buy for Mitt Romney in December 2011 is the only other expenditure Citizens for a Working America has ever made, records show. As of Thursday, the organization was listed as based in Dayton, Ohio, but on Friday that was changed to Beaufort, S.C.
Despite requests from the Federal Election Commission to do so, Citizens for a Working America has not disclosed its donors. Norm Cummings, a Virginia-based Republican political consultant whose name is on the organization’s filings, could not be reached for comment.

Mayfield Ad Attacks Fleischman’s Voting Record

Three weeks after promising to abstain from “negative” campaign advertising, Scottie Mayfield this week launched an attack ad condemning U.S. Rep. Chuck Fleischmann’s voting record — a record Mayfield praised as recently as May.
Further from Chris Carroll:
On July 5, after warning on Twitter “that we’ll be attacked on TV soon,” Mayfield spokesman Joe Hendrix told the Chattanooga Times Free Press that “Scottie committed to not going negative in any way.”
But Mayfield is the first 3rd Congressional District candidate to use television to target a rival, and opponents say the dairy executive’s latest ad proves he broke a campaign pledge to stay positive.
“This is what happens when a desperate campaign sees the race starting to slip away,” Fleischmann campaign spokesman Jordan Powell said.
Hendrix indicated the ad was “the truth.”
“Mr. Fleischmann is attacking Scottie instead of addressing the facts,” he said.
As sinister music plays over black-and-white video of President Barack Obama, the Mayfield ad’s unseen female narrator notes that “our congressman voted one out of four times with Obama.”
There’s more to the story. The ad’s “one out of four” claim is based on a Congressional Quarterly study in CQ Weekly that examined 2011 House votes “on which the president took a clear position.” According to the study, Obama took a clear position on 95 House votes in 2011. The House voted 945 times that year.
On those 95 votes, Fleischmann sided with the president 24 percent of the time. Other prominent conservatives had similar scores. U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., each voted with Obama 26 percent of the time, according to the study.
Fleischmann’s 24 percent tied with U.S. Reps. Diane Black and Marsha Blackburn, both Tennessee Republicans.
House Republicans, known for stalling much of the president’s agenda, averaged a score of 22 percent overall.
That’s tied with Republican cooperation during Democrat Bill Clinton’s administration. It’s the lowest cooperation rate Republicans have had with any president since Eisenhower in 1954, the study said

City Employees Get Time Off, Snacks to Meet Candidate

About 25 East Ridge city employees attended a reception for 3rd District Congressional candidate Scottie Mayfield during working hours and the city spent about $80 on providing snacks at the gathering, reports the Chattanooga TFP.
It may have been just an hour of cookies and punch, but a recent reception sponsored by East Ridge city officials for a congressional candidate is drawing questions about how local taxpayer money may be used.
City Manager Tim Gobble insisted that the reception was not meant to be an endorsement and was an attempt to be “hospitable,” but other city leaders have said it was an inappropriate use of city funds.
“It just looks bad,” said Councilman Jim Bethune, who attended the event but said flatly he is not a Mayfield supporter. “I don’t think he meant it as an endorsement, but you start to think about whether this is really our place, as a city, to do that.”
The event stemmed from conversations Gobble said he had with Mayfield several weeks ago, when the city manager invited the candidate to stop by City Hall to meet employees. Other local candidates have stopped by City Hall to glad-hand with residents, but none have been afforded a formal reception.

Mayfield Outspends Fleischmann, But Incumbent Has More Banked

Scottie Mayfield’s campaign spent more than U.S. Rep. Chuck Fleischmann in running for the 3rd Congressional District Republican nomination during the past three months, but the incumbent has substantially more cash on hand for the race’s final month, according to reports filed Monday.
A third candidate in the contest, Weston Wamp, is more or less in the middle of the other two, financially speaking.
Mayfield, a dairy company executive, reported receiving $182,696 during the second quarter while spending $380,180. The campaign listed a cash-on-hand balance of $218,638 on July 1.
Fleischmann’s campaign reported taking in $200,968 during the quarter while spending $230,639. The cash-on-hand balance was $730,538, which the congressman emphasized in a news release means that he “has over three times the amount of money that Scottie Mayfield does.”
It’s also more than twice the amount of cash that Wamp has on hand for the campaign windup.
“I am looking forward to the last three weeks of this campaign, and I know this support will allow me to spread my message of less government and a proven conservative record,” Fleischmann said in the release.
Wamp, son of former Congressman Zach Wamp, reported receipts for the quarter of $125,058, spending of $220,827 and a cash-on-hand balance of $340,336.
“We’ve exceeded our goals in funding Weston’s campaign and we are fully funded,” said Alexis Bogo, financial chair of the Wamp campaign in a statement sent to media.
The fourth Republican candidate in the GOP contest, Ron Bhalla, reported spending $14,145 for the quarter, leaving with a cash-on-hand balance of $1,310.
For the campaign since it began for Federal Election Commission purposes last year, Fleishmann has reported total spending of $493,555; Mayfield $633,344 and Wamp $267,486.
On the Democratic side, 3rd District candidate Bill Taylor reported loaning his campaign $6,300 during the quarter, boosting receipts to $8,411. Taylor spent $17,931 in the quarter and had $1,418 left when it ended, according to his FEC report. No new disclosure was available Monday on the FEC website for Democratic candidate Mary Headrick, who had a balance of $3,704 at last report.

Mayfield Tire-slashing Revisited: ‘I’m Not Ashamed of Why He Did It’

Three months after Scottie Mayfield said his 33-year-old son’s tire-slashing incident “has no place in campaigns,” Chris Carroll reports finding an audio wherein the dairy executive says, “I’m not ashamed of why he did it.”
The remark conflicts with a public apology Mayfield issued April 26 after his son, Michael Mayfield, confessed to slashing a tire belonging to an aide of U.S. Rep. Chuck Fleischmann.
In a written statement released the day the Kingston (Tenn.) Police Department charged his son with vandalism under $500, Mayfield apologized, called the slashing regrettable and said, “This kind of activity has no place in campaigns.”
But at a Nightside Pachyderm Club meeting in June, he had a little more to say.
“Lord have mercy,” Mayfield said, according to an audio recording obtained by the Chattanooga Times Free Press. “Who would have thought your son would have the passion that he had to lose his head after watching those guys follow us around for two days?
“I’ll tell you this,” he added. “I don’t like at all what my son did, and I’m ashamed of it. But I’m not ashamed of why he did it.”

Mayfield Says Attack Ads Coming; Foes Say ‘Not from Me’

Scottie Mayfield told supporters to expect “false/negative” television advertising from his Republican primary opponents in the coming weeks, reports Chris Carroll. But he declined to identify the source of that information or describe the content of the ads.
“Republican leaders and voters report that we’ll be attacked on TV soon,” the Athens, Tenn., dairy executive wrote on Twitter. “False/negative ads have no place in [Tennessee’s 3rd Congressional District Republican] primary.”
Joe Hendrix, a spokesman for Mayfield, said, “Scottie committed to not going negative in any way.” He declined further elaboration on that basis but said his boss anticipates attack ads with “fabricated” content.
U.S. Rep. Chuck Fleischmann, the well-financed, first-term incumbent Mayfield is trying to unseat, denied having knowledge of anything Mayfield implied.
…Republican challenger Weston Wamp flatly denied he would produce or approve any negative ads against Mayfield. A representative for Ron Bhalla, Fleischmann’s other GOP opponent, said such ads wouldn’t come from him.