Tag Archives: Marsha

Blackburn Strives to Save Ceiling Fans from Obama Attack

News release from U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn:
WASHINGTON – Representatives Marsha Blackburn (TN-7) and Todd Rokita (IN-4) today fought back against burdensome regulations being imposed on American ceiling fan manufacturers by the Department of Energy (DOE). Blackburn and Rokita secured a provision in H.R. 2609, the Fiscal Year 2014 Energy and Water Appropriations Bill, that would prevent any funds from being used by DOE to finalize, implement, or enforce the proposed “Standards Ceiling Fans and Ceiling Fan Light Kits” rule.
Ceiling fans and ceiling fan light kits already face existing regulations set in place by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005). These existing provisions burden the ceiling fan industry with ineffective mandates. However, on March 11, 2013, the Department of Energy (DOE) released a 101-page rulemaking framework document evaluating potential energy-savings requirements on ceiling fans through new regulations. The new regulations being considered by DOE would significantly impair the ability of ceiling fan manufacturers to produce reasonably priced, highly decorative fans. These regulations would not only place a higher price tag on less aesthetically pleasing designs but could increase homeowners’ reliance on other cooling systems that consume more electricity.
“First, they came for our health care, then they took away our light bulbs, and raided our nation’s most iconic guitar company — now they are coming after our ceiling fans. Nothing is safe from the Obama administration’s excessive regulatory tentacles,” Blackburn said. “These regulations extend into the homes of American families, raise cost for consumers, and kill the ability of our manufacturers to grow and create jobs. Enough is enough.

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Different Perspectives on Senate-passed Immigration Bill

Headline on Lamar Alexander Press release today:
Alexander Votes to Secure Border, End de Facto Amnesty
Says immigration reform now goes to U.S. House of Representatives to “improve the legislation and finish the job”
Headline on Marsha Blackburn Press Release today:
Senate Amnesty Bill D.O.A. In House Of Representatives
Text of the releases is below, along with statements from Sen. Bob Corker and Reps. Scott DesJarlais and Diane Black on the Senate’s passage of the immigration bill.

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Congressmen Back Alexander on Campaign Trail, Not on Internet Tax Trail

Known as an elder statesman among Tennessee politicians, U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander easily snatched up all the House members he wanted to support his 2014 re-election campaign. But Chris Carroll reports that many of those same conservative allies are ambivalent or even critical of the former governor’s top legislative priority.
Alexander is shepherding an unusual bill for a keep-taxes-low Volunteer State Republican. The Marketplace Fairness Act would allow states to force Internet retailers to do what brick-and-mortar businesses have done for ages: Collect sales taxes on every transaction and give the money to state and local governments.
Or, in Alexander’s words, give states the option to get “a tax that is already owed.”
But leading fiscal conservatives, including U.S. Reps. Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee and Tom Graves of Georgia, describe it as the scourge of small-government advocates: a new tax.
“The last thing we should do is raise new taxes on hard-working Americans who are already struggling in the Obama economy,” Graves said last week. Meanwhile, Blackburn put it bluntly: “There’s nothing fair about the Marketplace Fairness Act.”
As the 72-year-old Alexander attempts to dissuade potential tea party challengers in his bid for re-election, in-state opposition to his pet bill may undermine claims that he can still get things done and satisfy an increasingly conservative Tennessee electorate.
“Is it a liability for Alexander? It’s not clear what the public thinks on this,” Vanderbilt University political science professor Joshua Clinton said. “As a challenger, you may get some traction in the Republican primary.”
Alexander has no challengers to date. To help keep it that way, he added every Tennessee Republican House member (except scandal-plagued U.S. Rep. Scott DesJarlais) to his campaign team late last year. So far they aren’t helping him on this one.
“We have no formal position on the legislation at this time,” said Tiffany McGuffie, a spokeswoman for U.S. Rep. Phil Roe.
The bill is expected to pass the Senate this week; earlier this year, a test vote garnered 75 supporters. But in the House, where a tea party philosophy reigns, the Marketplace Fairness Act faces an uphill battle if Alexander’s own delegation is any indication.
“We don’t need the federal government mandating additional taxes on Tennessee families and businesses,” Blackburn said. “The American people have been taxed enough.”

Blackburn Wants to Shoot Skeet With Obama

After President Barack Obama said in an interview published last weekend that he and his guests “do skeet shooting all the time” at the presidential retreat, U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn has challenged him to a contest.
From the Tennessean:
“I think he should invite me to Camp David, and I’ll go skeet shooting with him,” the Brentwood Republican said on CNN. “And I bet I’ll beat him.”
Through a spokesman, Blackburn told The Tennessean she’s “not bad for a girl” at shooting skeet. She last went to a gun range nearly a year ago, but she used to co-host an annual “women’s skeet shoot-off” at a range in Maryland, spokesman Mike Reynard said.
On CNN, Blackburn said she doesn’t believe Obama’s “all the time” claim, since there are no photos of the recently re-inaugurated chief executive firing a gun and he hadn’t mentioned the hobby previously.
“Why have we not seen photos?” she said. “Why has he not referenced it at any point in time as we have had this gun debate that is ongoing? You would have thought it would have been a point of reference.”
White House press secretary Jay Carney told reporters Monday — before Blackburn did her best to ignite “Skeetgate” — he didn’t know how often Obama goes out on the gun range. He said he wasn’t aware of photos of the world’s most powerful man pulling the trigger.
“When he goes to Camp David, he goes to spend time with his family and friends and relax — not to produce photographs,” Carney said archly.
Joanna Rosholm, a White House spokeswoman, said Tuesday that Obama had not responded to Blackburn’s challenge.

On Rep. Marsha Blackburn and Her Five Foes

Excerpts from The Tennessean’s setup story on the 7th Congressional District race:
Re-elect her, Rep. Marsha Blackburn says, and voters will get what she’s always given them — a lawmaker passionate about staying in touch with constituents, making government transparent and curing its overspending.
Re-elect her, her opponents say, and voters will get someone who has turned into a Washington insider after 10 years in office.
Such are the battle lines in the race for the 7th Congressional District, the U.S. House seat that has drawn the most candidates in Tennessee this year, with six.
Blackburn, 60, a Brentwood Republican, says anyone who thinks she has become comfortable in Washington and no longer cares about changing things just isn’t paying attention.
“Look at who has been (making) an issue of out-of-control federal spending since Day 1,” she said in an interview. “I have been a solid member of a whole change-agent team.”
…Several of Blackburn’s five opponents, however, portray her as captured by the congressional lifestyle and the campaign contributions that come with it. Blackburn has raised $1.45 million for her 2012 campaign, and her personal political action committee and has cash on hand of $1.26 million. Sixty percent of her money comes from special interest PACs, a larger percentage than for any other Middle Tennessee member of Congress.
“She votes to take care of the needs of the corporate empire,” said Green Party candidate Howard Switzer, 67, an architect in Linden. Switzer says America needs decentralization of its economy — highlighted by more local food production — and more “earth-friendly” policies in general. Switzer also believes these are “apocalyptic times.”
The Democrat in the race is Credo Amouzouvik, a 34-year-old disabled Army veteran in Clarksville. Amouzouvik said he was motivated to run because the low approval ratings of Congress indicate voters are not getting the leadership they deserve.
…Another Army veteran in the race is independent candidate Jack Arnold of Kingston Springs, 38, who just graduated from Vanderbilt Law School. Arnold said he would emphasize changing a campaign finance system that makes lawmakers worry more about fundraising than addressing issues.
…Arnold is the only one of Blackburn’s opponents to report any campaign money to the Federal Election Commission. He’s raised $13,353, a mix of his own funds and some individual contributions, but no PAC money.
Another independent candidate, Leonard Ladner, 58, of Hohenwald, operates his own trucking firm and drives an 18-wheeler. Ladner said Blackburn is “a slick talker” and “a Republican who has been there too long.”
…The other candidate in the race is Ryan Akin, 44, a customer service representative from Bon Aqua who contends “the American way of life is diminishing right and left.”
Akin said his drive to preserve American values would emphasize the primacy of the English language, among other aspects of U.S. culture.

Congressmen Scold DOE Over Oak Ridge Security

Congressional Republicans and Democrats harshly scolded the U.S. Department of Energy on Wednesday for a security breach at the Oak Ridge Y-12 nuclear weapons plant in which three peace activists evaded guards and cut through fencing to infiltrate the facility’s highest-security area, reports Michael Collins.
U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., called the break-in appalling:
“Not only did you have a security breach,” she said, “you had a breach of public trust.”
U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., said the Y-12 infiltration was “a wake-up call if ever there was one.”
The July 28 security breach at the Oak Ridge plant, where warhead parts are manufactured and the nation’s stockpile of bomb-grade uranium is stored, dominated a congressional hearing Wednesday on safety and security at the nation’s nuclear facilities.
Lawmakers said they were astounded that three pacifists, including an 82-year-old nun, managed to cut through several layers of fencing and spray-paint messages, hang banners and pour human blood on the site.

100 Shows So Far This Year for GOP Celebrity Marsha Blackburn

In 2012, Congressman Marsha Blackburn of Brentwood has become one of the most recognized faces of the Republican Party and conservative causes in general, observes Gannett News Service – so much so that watching all of her media appearances on YouTube would be full-time job in itself.
Whenever congressional issues top the day’s news, TV and radio news producers quickly seek out the youthful-looking grandmother and small business owner to represent the right side of the political spectrum. Blackburn’s voice has an unmistakable Southern lilt but no one would ever accuse her of talking slow. GOP talking points come out in staccato, rapid-fire fashion.
So far this year, her office says, Blackburn has made more than 100 appearances on national and Tennessee-based television and radio programs.
They’ve ranged from Sunday morning’s “Meet the Press” on NBC and “This Week” on ABC to the “Alex Jones Show,” a Web-based and syndicated radio program out of Austin, Texas, hosted by one of the nation’s leading conspiracy theorists. She is also a favorite of the conservative Fox News and the Fox Business Network, the liberal MSNBC, CNBC and C-SPAN.

Marsha Blackburn Has Opponents

Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn is political media sensation virtually certain to win re-election, the Tennessean reports, But there is some opposition.
Her challengers acknowledge that taking on the Brentwood Republican won’t be easy.
But they are running, they say, because they don’t like what they see in Washington.
The four are independents Jack Arnold, Lenny Ladner and William Akin, and Democrat Credo Amouzouvik. A second Democrat, Chris Martin, also had filed to run but now says he has dropped out.
Howard Switzer of the Green Party is battling state officials in court over whether he also can appear on the ballot.
Arnold, of Kingston Springs, said Blackburn represents what’s wrong with Congress: partisan gridlock, the influence of moneyed special interests and a lack of term limits.
“It just doesn’t jive with what she presents herself as,” Arnold said. “She’s sort of the perfect example of why common-sense legislation and reform doesn’t get passed, and how that ties into campaign finance.”
Amouzouvik, of Clarksville, the only Democrat in the race, echoes those sentiments.
“As your congressman, I will always consult my conscience and my constituents, and not my party, corporate lobbyists, and those who give me campaign contributions as my opponent likes to do,” Amouzouvik says on his campaign website, which lists education and jobs as his priorities.
Amouzouvik, an Iraq War veteran and naturalized U.S. citizen born in Togo, is seeking a political science degree from Austin Peay State University. He could not be reached for comment
Arnold, who graduated from Vanderbilt Law School in May and spent a year in Iraq as an Army intelligence analyst, said campaign finance reform would be his first priority if elected. He also would focus on reforming the tax code and implementing term limits.
Arnold said he decided to run after Blackburn supported the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), which aimed to crack down on copyright infringement. While Blackburn rails against over-regulation, Arnold said, she favored expanding the government’s reach to crack down on Internet pirates because the music, TV and motion-picture industries are among her biggest donors.
Blackburn’s campaign has received more than $61,000 from those industries since the 2010 election, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

Blackburn Tops Congressional Beauty List

Excerpt from a Chas Sisk political notebook:

A new study says good-looking politicians get put on TV more often than ugly ones, and it includes this bit of bonus research: Tennessee’s own (and frequent cable-TV guest) Rep. Marsha Blackburn has been rated as Congress’s most attractive member.
The researchers from Israel asked college students — perhaps the world’s shrewdest arbiters of attractiveness — to rate all of the members of Congress outside of leadership, with Blackburn beating out the legitimately handsome South Dakota Sen. John Thune and Florida Rep. Connie Mack. Researchers then figured out how often each member showed up on television and determined that the hotties got more airtime.
“The effect of attractiveness on news coverage, the study found, was greater than the effect of tenure in office, or bill sponsorship,” The New York Times said in a write-up of the study. “Frequency of news releases had no discernible effect on news media appearances.”

Note: The referenced New York Times story is HERE.
See also Tennessee Ticket.

Blackburn’s Bright Idea for Christmas Giving

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn says she’s stuffing stockings with a bright present this year: the kind of light bulbs that are due to be phased out next year.
The Brentwood Republican had backed a provision to cut funding for an energy efficiency law scheduled to take effect Jan. 1, effectively ending the manufacture of 100-watt incandescent light bulbs.
Congress on Saturday passed a reprieve for the bulbs, delaying until October the impact of the 2007 light bulb law signed by President George W. Bush.
Blackburn says in a statement provided to The Tennessean that she will fight “so that people can keep their light bulbs.” (http://tnne.ws/tz7Ec8).
Conservation advocates say the energy savings can’t be argued with. Opponents say it’s government intrusion, too.