Tag Archives: Loughry

Vandalism Charge (for destroying campaign sign) Dismissed

Judge David Loughry dismissed new Democratic Property Assessor Rob Mitchell’s campaign sign vandalism charges against past Republican Property Assessor Bill Boner Tuesday, reports the Murfreesboro Daily News Journal.
Mitchell, who won the Aug. 2 election, spent nearly all of his first official day in office at the County Judicial Building after he took out a warrant to have Boner arrested in July. He accused the incumbent of damaging a campaign banner that had been hanging on the side of a wall at the Premier 6 movie theater at Jackson Heights shopping center where Boner serves as the property manager.
Judge Loughry, though, said during the preliminary hearing that Boner had to respond to a Murfreesboro Building and Codes Department warning that the city only allows three temporary signs per property.
“Mr. Boner has the approved authority to determine the three signs,” Loughry ruled in determining there was no probably cause to send the case to a grand jury.
The judge noted that the sign in question was hung back up with duct tape before Mitchell agreed to take it down.

UT Foundation Raises $1.3B, Hires More Fundraisers

The University of Tennessee Foundation has hired five new fundraising employees and expects to hire seven more by the end of October, reports Megan Boehnke. The move is part of a five-year push to increase donations by increasing the number of people asking for them.
At the same time, the foundation is wrapping up its seven-year fundraising campaign and is expecting to reach $1.3 billion in gifts by the Dec. 31 close date.
“When we started this campaign, we didn’t know we were going to have the recession, and the common wisdom when we were moving into this recession was (for) so many schools in adjacent states that had a billion-dollar campaign, they completely pulled out of it because they thought, ‘There’s no way we can accomplish this,'” said Andrea Loughry, chair of the UT Foundation board, following a meeting Thursday in the Haslam Business Building.
“So to accomplish that in this economy is a huge pat on a back for our professional staff but also a huge compliment to the alumni and friends of the University of Tennessee and the fact that they keep on giving in spite of the economy we’ve been in.”
As the foundation — the system’s fundraising arm — wraps up its first $1 billion campaign, it also is reorganizing. The Legislature in the spring approved a new “interdependent” structure for the foundation that allows it to manage its own payroll and ultimately hire 60 new employees over five years in hopes of doubling annual giving by 2020.
Of the five new employees, the university hired three fundraising officers who will work in regional cities with large alumni bases: Nashville, Charlotte, N.C., and Houston, said Scott Rabenold, acting vice president for development and alumni affairs.
“The No. 1 reason people don’t give is because they aren’t asked,” Rabenold said. “We have very passionate alumni and very successful alumni, so the biggest obstacle to our successful fundraising is getting out and talking to them. The more boots we can put on the ground, the greater impact we can have for students and faculty.”