Tag Archives: joseph

Governor to Go Along With Early Judge Selection Plan

Tennessee’s Judicial Nominating Commission, which will cease to exist at the end of this month, is moving to play its role in naming successors to three appeals court judges who have announced they will retire more than a year from now.
The commission’s farewell performances will come in meetings June 27, 28 and 29 to select nominees to succeed Court of Appeals Judge Patricia Cottrell of Nashville, Court of Criminal Appeals Judge Joseph Tipton of Knoxville and Court of Appeals Judge Alan Highers of Memphis.
All three have announced an intention to retire effective Aug. 30, 2014, when the terms of all sitting state judges will expire following retention elections for new judicial terms on Aug. 7, 2014.
If things go according to plan, the commission will submit a slate of nominees to succeed each of the three retiring appellate judges to Gov. Bill Haslam before June 30, when the panel will “sunset,” or cease to exist.

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Two Appealate Court Judges Won’t Seek Retention Re-election

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Two Tennessee appellate court judges have notified Gov. Bill Haslam that they will not run for another term on the bench in the August 2014 retention election.
Patricia J. Cottrell, a judge on the Court of Appeals, and Joseph M. Tipton, who sits on the Court of Criminal Appeals bench, will both leave after September of next year.
The announcements come after the state legislature left Tennessee without a way to replace judges who step down or die when a commission expires at the end of next month.
Members of the soon-to-be-defunct Judicial Nominating Commission will make recommendations for replacements to give to Haslam before the panel expires. Haslam will appoint the replacements from those recommendations.
Note: News release below

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Jimmy Duncan Has Opponents and 100,000 New Voters

U.S. Rep. John J. Duncan, senior member of Tennessee’s congressional delegation, is introducing himself to voters who were not previously part of his district before reapportionment earlier this year, reports Michael Collins.
Nearly 100,000 voters in Jefferson, Grainger, Claiborne and Campbell counties have been thrown into the 2nd Congressional District, which also takes in all of Knox, Loudon and Blount counties.
Duncan, who turns 65 later this month, said he already knows many of the new voters and has been making an effort to introduce himself to the others. He has attended ribbon cuttings, spoken at GOP dinners, held meet-and-greets with local officials and mailed out a campaign flier to potential primary voters in the new district.
In the Aug. 2 primary, Duncan will face two little-known Republicans – Joseph Leinweber Jr., an Air Force retiree who lives in Knoxville, and Nick Ciparro, a full-student who is also from Knoxville. Neither Leinweber nor Ciparro has held public office, and neither expects to spend more than a couple thousand dollars on the race.
The winner will face Democrat Troy Christopher Goodale in November.
Both Leinweber and Ciparro have tried to portray Duncan as someone who is ineffective, out of touch and has been in office far too long.
“John Duncan is a nice guy, but I think it is time for him to go,” said Leinweber, 60, who ran against the congressman two years ago as an independent.
Leinweber, who supports term limits and believes Congress should stick to the powers given to it in the Constitution, said he’s running because the federal government is broken and useless. “I don’t even call it Washington – I call it the district of corruption,” he said. “It’s an affront to George Washington put his name there.”
Ciparro, 32, also supports limited constitutional government and says lawmakers should stop spending money the government doesn’t have.
“To be honest, I don’t want to be in Congress – I hate those guys,” Ciparro said when asked why he’s running. But, “that might be also why I’m running. I’m tired of a bunch of do-nothings running things.”
For his part, Duncan said if he’s re-elected, he will keep pushing for many of the same things he has championed since he was elected to succeed his father, John J. Duncan Sr., more than 23 years ago. That includes fiscal conservatism, lowering the national debt, holding down energy costs and pursuing a non-interventionist foreign policy to keep the country out of unnecessary wars.
To those who think he has been in office too long, Duncan says, “I’m very grateful for the people for electing me through the years, and I’ve worked very, very hard. I’m willing to keep on working just as hard as I ever have over the next couple of years.”