Tag Archives: jenkins

Rogersville Lawyer Named Judge

News release from governor’s office:
NASHVILLE – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam today appointed Douglas T. Jenkins of Rogersville as Chancellor in the 3rd Judicial District, replacing Thomas R. Frierson who was named to the Tennessee Court of Appeals in February.
The 3rd Judicial District serves Hamblen, Hancock, Hawkins and Greene counties.
“Doug has a depth of experience in law, and I am pleased to make this appointment,” Haslam said. “I appreciate his willingness to serve, and I know he will do an excellent job on the bench.”
Jenkins, 45, has practiced in the Law Office of Douglas T. Jenkins in Rogersville since 1997. He worked in the Law Offices of Terry, Terry & Stapleton in Morristown from 1995-1997.
His areas of practice have included domestic relations; probate/wills/estate/estate litigation; criminal defense and property boundary disputes. Jenkins has been owner and manager of a private family farm in Hawkins County since 1986.

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Frank Niceley Starts Blogging

State Sen. Frank Niceley has launched a blog with initial posts on topics ranging from “Rocky the squirrel” being foiled in an attempt to break into the state capitol complex (with photo) to a reminiscence on “legendary East Tennessee criminal defense attorney Ray Jenkins.”
The very first post provides a hat tip of sorts to Sen. Stacey Campfield, a fellow conservative Republican who was apparently the first state legislator to start a blog several years ago. Therein Niceley recalls a conversation with then-House Speaker Jimmy Naifeh:
“Frank, you all have to do something about Campfield,” he said obviously agitated, “he has a blog!” I replied, “what’s a blog?” Naifeh paused and responded, “I don’t know but it sounds bad.” He hurried off.
The blog is entitled “Frank Niceley said, What?” with the subhead “politics, history, humor, farming.. You’ll find it HERE

On the Death of a Property Tax Assessor in Loudon County

Jack McElroy looks at the political pressures that apparently were involved in the suicide of Chuck Jenkins, who had been property tax assessor in Loudon County since 2006 and who previously worked for the Republican National Committee and the administration of the first President George Bush.
Jenkins looked into what appeared to be inappropriate assessments of property by his predecessor and provided his findings to the local district attorney general, who decided not to prosecute.
Reporter Hugh Willett, who wrote many stories about the Arp-Ross shenanigans for the News Sentinel, relied on Jenkins as a source in his reporting. But whistle-blowing turned Jenkins into a pariah in some GOP circles in Loudon County, where Arp had become mayor.
“He stuck his neck out and went on the record in the face of tremendous political pressure from supporters of Arp and other powerful people in the county,” said Willett. “While I was interviewing him he often made reference to the notion that the only reason he was doing this was because he knew what happened was wrong and he didn’t want to be a part of covering it up. He knew that he was making a lot of powerful enemies in Loudon County.”
More recently, Jenkins had been battling Tate & Lyle and Kimberly-Clark, two of Loudon County’s largest businesses, over their assessments. The companies recently appealed to the state equalization board, triggering a yearlong process.
Suicides have no simple explanations or causes, and no one can tell what demons haunted Jenkins in his final hours. But the burden of being an honest and dedicated public official must have taken a toll.
“It really hurt Chuck when the special prosecutor found that there was nothing to prosecute in the Arp case,” Willett remembered. “He laughed and told me, ‘No good deed goes unpunished.’ “