Tag Archives: hogs

‘Wild-appearing hogs’ must now carry an ID in Tennessee

News release from state Department of Agriculture:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Tennessee Department of Agriculture today announced a revised Order by the State Veterinarian specifying conditions under which wild-appearing hogs are to be transported in the state.
The revised order, which went into effect June 10, is in support of legislation passed last year by the Tennessee General Assembly and signed into law by Gov. Bill Haslam making it illegal to transport and release wild-appearing hogs without documentation from the department.
“Wild hogs have the propensity to reproduce in great numbers, carry diseases, destroy crops and cause serious ecological damage,” state veterinarian Charles Hatcher, DVM, said. “The new order strengthens efforts to prevent the illegal transportation and releasing of wild hogs by requiring individual animal identification and documentation for all wild-appearing hogs being moved.”
Wild hogs are typically two to three feet tall and up to five feet long with larger heads and heavier shoulders compared to domesticated breeds. Wild hogs also have smaller, pointed and heavily furred ears, longer snouts, tusks and straight tails.
The previous order exempted individual animal identification in specific cases. The revised order requires all wild-appearing swine being moved within Tennessee to have state or federally approved individual animal identification and:

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TWRA Corraling Hogs Remotely

By Randall Dickerson, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — How many wildlife agents does it take to catch a wild hog? Only one — under a new remote system used by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Richard Kirk, an agency program manager, said the new system alerts an on-call agent when there is movement under the trap. Cameras are set up with the trap and the agent can watch feral hogs by video, springing the trap by pushing a button on a computer or smartphone from miles away.
Agents set up a corral that is 35 feet in diameter and bait it with corn. When hogs wander close and set off a motion detector focused on the gate, an agent gets a text message. Then they can watch the video and drop the trap.
Kirk said the new technology can save a lot of staff time. Previously, four agents would study the feeding patterns of a group of feral hogs, set up the trap and then return early on the day they hoped to capture them. Now, they study the feeding patterns, place the trap and wait for a text message.
“This system allows one person at a computer at 2 a.m. to make the capture, versus four people spending three to four hours out there,” Kirk said.

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The Wild-Appearing Hog Order is Out

News release from state Department of Agriculture:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Tennessee Department of Agriculture today announced an Order by the State Veterinarian specifying conditions under which wild-appearing hogs are to be transported in the state.
The order was issued in support of legislation passed this year by the Tennessee General Assembly and signed into law by Gov. Bill Haslam making it illegal to transport and release wild-appearing hogs without proper documentation. The new law goes into effect July 1.
“Wild hogs have the propensity to reproduce in great numbers, carry diseases, destroy crops and cause serious ecological damage,” state veterinarian Charles Hatcher said. “The purpose of the order is to help reduce the incidence of disease and to support efforts to prevent the illegal transportation and releasing of wild hogs.”
Wild hogs are typically two to three feet tall and up to five feet long with larger heads and heavier shoulders compared to domesticated breeds. Wild hogs also have smaller, pointed and heavily furred ears, longer snouts, tusks and straight tails.
Under the order, all wild-appearing swine being moved within the state must have one of the following:
ยท State or federally approved individual identification and proof that each hog has tested negative for Pseudorabies and Brucellosis within 90 days of movement.
Proof that each individual hog originated from a Validated Brucellosis-free and Qualifed Pseudorabies-negative herd.
A movement authorization number from the state veterinarian’s office.
Movement authorization numbers will be issued for wild-appearing swine being moved directly to slaughter, to a quarantined facility or to a veterinarian for testing. The order also provides for a movement authorization number to be issued for the transportation of wild-appearing production swine that are raised for meat or breeding purposes. Production facilities for which movement authorization numbers are issued may be subject to inspection by the department for verification purposes.
Movement authorization numbers can be obtained by phone Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. central time by calling the state veterinarian’s office at 615-837-5120. Producers will be required to provide information including the number of swine and the place of origin and destination. Movement authorization numbers will be good for specific transportation activities for up to 30 days.
For more information or to view the state veterinarian’s order visit TDA at www.tn.gov/agriculture and click on the Animal Health Information link.

No More Turning Loose ‘Wild-appearing Swine’

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The House has passed a bill seeking to make it a crime to knowingly transport or release “wild-appearing swine” in Tennessee without proper documentation.
The chamber voted 91-2 on Wednesday in favor of the bill sponsored by Republican Rep. Ron Lollar of Bartlett.
Loller said the measure seeks to discourage people from illegally bringing wild boar into the state by raising the fine for violations from $250 per trailer to $2,500 per swine.
The measure would only allow state wildlife officials to stop and inspect pig trailers if they have a reasonable suspicion that they contain wild boar.
The Senate previously approved its version of the bill on a 31-0 vote, but would have to agree to House changes before the measure can head to the governor’s desk.

Cumberland County Commission Wants Its Own Hog Law

The Cumberland County Commission has approved a resolution urging the Legislature to enact a “private act” for the county allowing the hunting of wild hogs with dogs, reports the Crossville Chronicle.
The resolution passed unanimously and will be forwarded to state Representative Cameron Sexton requesting a private act be passed for Cumberland County.
County Commissioner Carmin Lynch, 9th District, asked what difference the private act would make.
“It’s confusing and I wonder what difference a private act will make,” Lynch said.
Joe Koester, 5th District commissioner, said he also wondered the same thing and spoke with TWRA (Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency) about the matter and invited TWRA Region III Wildlife Program Manager Kirk Miles to come to the meeting to answer questions.
Miles explained the main difference between the current law and the private act, or resolution, would be that hunters or landowners would not need a permit to hunt the wild hogs with dogs.
The other significant difference is that, with the private act, there would be no limit as to how many designated hunters could be used to capture or eradicate the hogs from a landowner’s property. The discretion would be up to the landowner, who could designate any means necessary to protect their land and property from destruction from free running feral hogs.
The current law sets a limit of 10 designated hunters to help.

Hog Wars: Could Eradication of Hogs Tie into Abolishing Commission?

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Commission’s moves to eradicate wild hogs may have added fuel to a smoldering controversy in the Legislature over whether the commission should be transformed or even abolished.
The war on hogs began earlier this year after the Legislature approved a bill changing the legal status of wild pigs from a protected game species to a “nuisance” animal. The commission responded with a proclamation that legalizes multiple new means for killing hogs by landowners while prohibiting traditional hunting of them.
State Rep. John Mark Windle, D-Livingston, says the hunting ban — which includes forbidding use of dogs to chase hogs in most public hunting areas — was “absolutely not” what he had in mind when sponsoring the bill to change hogs’ legal status.
He and some other legislators, particularly in East Tennessee and along the Cumberland Plateau, say they have been swamped with more complaints on the proclamation than on any other subject.
The Tennessee Hunters Alliance, formed recently in large part because of unhappiness over the hog proclamation, has 450 members who have made financial donations and about 6,000 “supporters,” said Patrick Garrison, president of the organization and owner of Caryonah Hunting Lodge, located on about 2,000 acres near Crossville.
“We didn’t have a voice,” says Garrison, who characterizes the commission’s hog rules as “ridiculous.”

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TWRA Reopens Catoosa to Public

News release from TWRA:
CROSSVILLE, Tenn. — The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has announced that Catoosa Wildlife Management Area located in Cumberland, Morgan, and Fentress counties will be re-opened to public access effective Saturday, Aug. 20, 2011.
Catoosa WMA has been officially closed since Aug. 8, 2011 due to vandalism in the form of nails, spikes, and nail boards placed in secondary roads and fields across the area. The WMA was closed for public safety concerns related to the vandalism.
Throughout the 12-day closure, TWRA personnel have worked to find and remove the dangerous materials. As a result of the cleanup effort, TWRA officials have made significant efforts to find and remove the hazardous material and now are reasonably assured that the WMA is safe again for public use.

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Hog-Related Vandalism Closes TWRA’s Catoosa Management Area

News relelase from TWRA:
NASHVILLE —The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has announced that Catoosa Wildlife Management Area located in Cumberland, Morgan, and Fentress counties will be closed to all public access effective Monday, Aug. 8, 2011. TWRA officials believe this closure is necessary to ensure the safety of visitors using Catoosa WMA and agency employees working in the area.
Since late June, vandals have placed nails, spikes, and nail-boards in fields, secondary roads, and trails on the WMA. TWRA officials believe this vandalism may be a reaction by a small group of individuals dissatisfied with recent changes in the management of wild hog populations on Catoosa.
As part of the overall strategy to address the increasing wild hog population on the Cumberland Plateau, an aggressive program to trap and remove wild hogs was initiated on Catoosa WMA in early June, according to Kirk Miles, TWRA Region III Wildlife Program Manager. Shortly thereafter, employees began finding nails and spikes in fields and along secondary roads accessing wild hog trap sites.
“Initially, we felt that we were able to effectively find and clean up the vandalized sites,” Miles said. “However, the problem has escalated to the point that we no longer feel the area is safe for public use.”
To date 13 tires have been damaged on TWRA trucks used on the WMA. Ten of the tires had to be replaced. Four tractor tires have had flat tires repaired. One TWRA employee narrowly escaped serious injury when he stepped on a large nail.

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Legislature Liberalizes Rules for Shooting Pigs Gone Wild

Wild pigs are no longer considered big game for hunters, under a new state law taking effect this month, reports WPLN. Officials say they’re hoping the move will make it easier for farmers and landowners to keep Tennessee’s feral hog population in check.
Feral hogs are basically escaped farmyard pigs that have turned back into wild animals, with longer teeth and tails. They’re considered a major nuisance in parts of East Tennessee because they’re insatiable eaters as well as prolific breeders. State Representative John Mark Windle compares them to small bulldozers.
“They’ll just make row after row after row through the woods and through the pastures, and it looks like somebody’s taken a submarine and driven through the ground, or a giant mole or some other type of disturbance.”

Windle (and Sen. Steve Southerland, R-Morristown) sponsored a new law (it was HB947) which paved the way for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency to change its rules on killing wild hogs.
Chief of Wildlife and Forestry Daryl Ratajczak says what they had been doing – issuing hunting licenses – was making things worse.
“Folks that wanted to hunt hogs would trap them illegally, transport them illegally, and release them illegally into different parts of the state. And so this idea of sport-hunting was kind of detrimental to our hog-control management.”
So instead of giving people big-game permits to hunt pigs, now Ratajczak says property owners can kill them without asking permission. And they can get the OK over the phone for a group of up to 10 to help. They can also go to lengths normal hunters couldn’t – they can kill pigs in traps or over bait, as well as at night.

On Snakes, Hogs, Guns and Legislators

State Sen. Stacey Campfield contends a precedent for passage of his “guns on campus” bill has been set by advancing legislation that’s intended to let an Overton County farm overseer shoot snakes or wild hogs.
As passed 92-1 by the House, the bill in question authorizes “farm employees” of the University of Tennessee and the state Board of Regents to carry weapons.
The bill, HB185, came before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday afternoon, shortly after the panel had voted to postpone until 2012 any action on Campfield’s guns-on-campus bill, which would allow faculty and staff of universities to carry guns if they have a handgun carry permit. A House committee also killed the bill for this year.
Sen. Ken Yager, R-Harriman, said an agreement had been reached by all parties concerned to amend the “guns on farms” bill to exclude all UT facilities and, in effect, apply only to one 1,200-acre farm in Overton County that has been leased by Tennessee Technological University, part of the Regents system.
The farm overseer, whose family owned the farm for years, wants to “protect himself from snakes,” Yager told colleagues, and needs to carry a gun to do so.
“I believe it’s illegal to shoot snakes in Tennessee,” said Campfield.
“What else are you supposed to do with them?” replied Yager, touching off a round of convoluted debate.

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