Tag Archives: hank

On Senate District 8 and a Campaign Relationship

The four-candidate race in Senate District has been reviews Hank Hayes. An excerpt.
Jackson, meanwhile, is hoping her name identification in Hawkins County
— the district’s largest county in population — will push her ahead,
although she finished third in the 2010 GOP Primary for the county
mayor’s race.
“I have put out more than 1,000 signs…I’m running a retail campaign,
going door-to-door and seeing people face to face,” said Jackson, a Realtor.
Rice, however, takes issue with Jackson’s connection to former state
Agriculture Commissioner Ken Givens, a Rogersville Democrat.
“I signed her (nominating) petition; (but) I told her that after quite a
bit of encouragement from the leadership of the Republican Party in our
district (and beyond ), that I had also decided to run for the state
Senate seat,” Rice said in an e-mail. “She stood up and looked extremely
upset; then told me that Ken Givens was going to be able to raise quite
a bit of ($249,000) money for her and that I couldn’t raise near that
much and that (Givens) could get Democrats to cross over and vote in the
Republican Primary.”
In response to Rice’s e-mail, Jackson said: “I did not say anything like
that….We didn’t discuss anything about money. He must have a bad
memory or he is not telling the truth.”
Givens, a former state representative and a widower, acknowledged he’s
in a relationship with Jackson.
“When she announced she was running for state Senate, I would think that
most people would understand that someone seeing someone would probably
support them,” Givens explained. “…If I’m from Hawkins County, it
would only make sense that I would want somebody from Hawkins County
whether I was seeing Cynthia or not…I’m not ashamed or timid that I
would back a Hawkins Countian…I don’t have any plan to go after
Democrat votes. That’s something people decide for themselves.”
Aside from attacking Jackson, Rice said he’s focusing on jobs and
education in his campaign appearances.


Note: The full article is below.

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Hank Dye Retires; UT Shifts Lobbyist Lineup

The University of Tennessee will split its government relations and communications department next month following the retirement of the vice president who oversaw those duties, President Joe DiPietro told staff in an email Wednesday.
From the News Sentinel:
Hank Dye, vice president of public and government relations since 2005, will retire July 11, something he had discussed with the president since the beginning of the year, DiPietro wrote. Anthony Haynes, UT’s lobbyist in Nashville, will become vice president for government relations and advocacy, reporting directly to DiPietro.
Kurt Schlieter, UT’s advocate in Washington, D.C., will become assistant vice president for federal relations and continue to work out of D.C. DiPietro wrote in the email that he is still examining the system’s communications strategy and has asked a seven-person review committee to give recommendations for how to structure a department to handle communications, marketing and branding.
In the meantime, Gina Stafford, assistant vice president and director of communications for the system, will manage day-to-day operations.

Hagerty Reshuffles Film, Entertainment Commission

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bill Hagerty announced key appointments today to the Tennessee Film Entertainment and Music Commission (TFEMC).
Bob Raines, who was most recently serving as interim executive director, is now the executive director. Music industry veteran Hank Adam Locklin will fill the newly created role of director of music and business development.

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Hank Williams Jr. ‘Out of Here’ After Flap Over Obama-Hitler Analogy

BRISTOL, Conn. (AP) — Are you ready for some football? Hank Williams Jr. isn’t anymore.
The country singer and ESPN each took credit for the decision Thursday morning to ax his classic intro to “Monday Night Football.”
The network had pulled the song from the game earlier this week after Williams made an analogy to Adolf Hitler while discussing President Barack Obama on Fox News on Monday morning.
“After reading hundreds of e-mails, I have made MY decision,” Williams said in a statement to The Associated Press. “By pulling my opening Oct 3rd, You (ESPN) stepped on the Toes of The First Amendment Freedom of Speech, so therefore Me, My Song, and All My Rowdy Friends are OUT OF HERE. It’s been a great run.”
But ESPN’s statement said: “We have decided to part ways with Hank Williams Jr. We appreciate his contributions over the past years. The success of Monday Night Football has always been about the games and that will continue.”
Spokesman Kirt Webster said Williams made the decision Wednesday night, while the network said it informed Williams of the move Thursday morning.

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Government Lobbying Government (and UT’s lobbyist in Washington)

The News Sentinel today carries a national story on state and local governments hiring lobbyists to work in Washington at a cost of $1.2 billion over the past decade – complete with a state-by-state chart on the spending.
A related story by Steve Ahillen provides more Tennessee-specific information, including a report on the University of Tennessee’s full-time lobbyist in Washingnton.
t has proved worthwhile to have someone (in Washington),” said Hank Dye, UT’s vice president for public and government relations. “If you don’t have somebody up there representing you, I think you’d be missing out.”
(UT) has a full-time Washington lobbyist on its staff, Kurt Schlieter, whose title is Associate Vice President and Director of Federal Relations. He has been on the job since 2003 after serving as legislative assistant and appropriations associate on the staff of then-Tennessee Congressman Zach Wamp. He makes $132,599.96 a year.
“There’s more lobbying done by the University of Tennessee than probably any other public institution in the state of Tennessee,” said U.S. Rep. John J. Duncan Jr., R-Tenn.
And, most, but not all, is done through Schlieter.

(Note: UT also has a lobbyist in Nashville, Anthony Haynes, who on occasion — as in combating the ‘guns on campus’ bill or dealing with budget issues — is assisted by Dye and others.)

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