Tag Archives: frog

FROG Jump PAC Leaps Ahead of Other TN Freshman PACs

Tennessee’s first-term House members are donating thousands of dollars to other freshmen lawmakers, a move political experts say may help them advance up the rungs of party leadership, reports The Tennessean.
Republican Rep. Stephen Fincher of Frog Jump has donated more to his fellow freshmen than all but two other first-term lawmakers, according to data published Thursday by the Capitol Hill newspaper Politico. Fincher’s political action committee, called Funding Republicans Supporting Opportunity and Growth (FROG) Jump PAC, has given $22,500 to freshmen since December, campaign finance records show.
Fincher’s campaign committee contributed an additional $6,000 to the National Republican Congressional Committee last year to help fund other Republicans’ races. Republican Rep. Scott DesJarlais of Jasper ranked sixth in contributions to his fellow freshmen, according to Politico. His recently launched PAC, called TN4U PAC for the 4th District DesJarlais represents, donated $11,000 to first-term Republicans in March.
Rep. Diane Black, R-Gallatin, hasn’t used her PAC to donate to individual candidates, but she donated $50,000 to the NRCC through her campaign committee. Federal election rules don’t limit how much candidates can contribute to party committees.

For Committee Service, ‘Farmer from Frog Jump’ Picks Banking Over Farming

While he came to political prominence as the “farmer from Frog Jump,” Rep. Stephen Fincher, R-Tenn., has decided in Washington that he’d rather serve on the committee that deals with banks rather than the committee that deals with agriculture, reports National Journal’s Hotline.
(Fincher) was one of the media’s favorite subjects for profiling in the run-up to the 2010 elections. The Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal, among others, spotlighted the man they dubbed the “Farmer from Frog Jump” and his stewardship of a 2,500-acre farm that’s been in his family for seven generations.
But in Washington, Fincher has a decidedly different priority. Last month, Fincher won a coveted appointment to the House Financial Services Committee — a move that forced him to give up his spot on the Agriculture Committee.
“I am honored to join such a distinguished and prominent committee in the House of Representatives. During these times of economic uncertainty, the House Financial Services Committee will play an important role in creating jobs and fostering an environment that allows businesses to grow,” Fincher said in a press release announcing the move. “I am confident that my real world business experience will bring a strong frame-of-reference to the Committee and assist in developing strong public policy to turn our economy around.”
Fincher will no doubt reap the other great benefit of the Financial Services Committee: It’s a lot more lucrative to serve on a panel that interests banking lobbyists than on a panel that handles agriculture policy. Fincher was one of the better-funded first-time candidates in 2010.
But with a farm bill coming up next year, what would Fincher’s rural constituents — who make up 53 percent of his district — think about his move?
Fincher spokeswoman Sara Sendek tells us: “Financial Services is a tremendous opportunity to allow agriculture interests to be addressed. Access to capital, lending and ability to hedge risk are the cornerstones for agriculture success. Congressman Fincher’s background running his family farm brings forth a perspective that has not been heard on the Committee, especially as Congress is revisiting Dodd-Frank, which would restrict capital once fully implemented.”