Tag Archives: fake

Phony drivers’ licenses flood bars (but not voting precincts?)

Phony drivers’ licenses from overseas have swamped bars and clubs around the University of Tennessee campus — so many some bars now ask for two kinds of identification, reports the News Sentinel. For teenagers, they’re a license to drink and to party.
For police and for bar owners, they’re a neverending headache.
“I’ve seen trained law enforcement officers look at them and not spot the difference,” said Trevor Hill, owner of The Hill bar on Forest Avenue in Fort Sanders. “We’ve gotten them from different states and from 12 or 14 countries. It’s rampant on campus. My collection right now’s right around 300, and that’s not counting what we’ve turned over to the police. I’d say we’ll take up several hundred more in the first month of school.”
…ID Chief, the leading forger, operates from China and advertises its bogus wares on a website based in the Philippines.
Each fake comes with a duplicate for emergencies.
“If you lose one, you don’t have to pay for another,” the site explains.
Pick a name, state and address. Scan and send a photo and clear copy of your signature. Fill out the order form and pay by credit card or money order, then sit back and allow up to 10 business days for shipping.
Don’t worry about what happens to your personal information.A pair of fakes cost $200. Three pairs go for $600.Find enough friends and get a price break — special discounts for 10 or more. The site offers Christmas, Halloween and back-to-school sales
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Keisling Obama Conspiracy Emailing Gets Huffington Post Note

A Republican member of the Tennessee state legislature emailed constituents Tuesday morning with a rumor circulating in conservative circles that President Barack Obama is planning to stage a fake assassination attempt in an effort to stop the 2012 election from happening.
Further from The Huffington Post:
Rep. Kelly Keisling (R-Byrdstown) sent an email from his state email account to constituents containing a rumor that Obama and the Department of Homeland Security are planning a series of events that could lead to the imposition of “martial law” and delay the election. Among the events hypothesized in the email is a staged assassination attempt on the president that would lead to civil unrest in urban areas and martial law.
Keisling appears to have forwarded a more widely circulated email from Joe Angione, a Florida-based conservative blogger. Angione prefaces the rumor by saying it has not been confirmed but likewise notes it has not been denied. Angione also writes that people need to work to prevent the rumor from becoming reality.
The conspiracy theory started with an article written by Doug Hammon and posted on CanadaFreePress.com, which he said arose from conversations he had with an informant within the Department of Homeland Security.
….Keisling’s assistant, Frankie Anderson, confirmed that the email was sent “at Keisling’s request” from a state account under the name of Holt Whitt, who is identified in the email as Keisling’s assistant. Anderson said he is filling in for Whitt.
Anderson said that Keisling did not offer an explanation for why he wanted the email sent. It went to residents across the 38th district, which includes Clay, Jackson, Pickett and Scott Counties, along with part of Anderson County. Keisling has not returned messages left at his Byrdstown insurance office, and there was no answer at his home.


Note: The forwarded email is below.

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That Panda Was NOT Ryan Haynes (and the TBI is NOT investigating)

State Rep. Ryan Haynes’ Facebook identify was stolen last week and the imposter posted fake statements using “a lot of colorful language” under the lawmaker’s name for a while, the Knoxville Republican said Monday.
Haynes said he had visited a library on Wednesday and logged into Facebook while there. He speculated that someone may have seen him type in a password and used it to take over his page on the social media network later.
His listing of personal information was changed to say that he was homosexual and that he worked for the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft, a reference to the school attended by the fictional Harry Potter. His picture on the site was replaced by a photo of a panda.
The imposter also sent messages that were offensive to many, the legislator said, and when the missive brought a response, replied in a flippant and derogatory manner.
“I got about 150 phone calls in 30 minutes,” he said. “People thought I was committing political suicide and wanted to know what was going on.”
Haynes said he called Tennessee Bureau of Investigation Director Mark Gwyn, who advised him “there really wasn’t much they could do.”
Kristen Helm, spokeswoman for TBI, confirmed the conversation and said Gwyn had advised Haynes to get in touch with Facebook directly.
“Due to Facebook’s policies and procedures, law enforcement does not have a mechanism in place to investigate complaints about Facebook. So TBI is not investigating this incident,” Helm said in an email.
A law approved by the General Assembly earlier this year – with Haynes among the large majority voting for it – authorizes law enforcement to obtain identifying information on those who post statements or pictures intended to cause “emotional distress.”
Haynes agreed that the law should not apply in his case.
“I can’t say that I was emotionally distressed,” he said. “I just wanted to make sure people knew that wasn’t me doing all that.”
The legislator said he subsequently got in touch with Facebook overseers who deleted the imposter postings and “everything is straightened out now.”