Tag Archives: donate

Jim Sasser. former senator and ambassador, donates papers to Vanderbilt

News release from Vanderbilt University:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. – James R. Sasser, a former three-term U.S. senator from Tennessee and ambassador to the People’s Republic of China, and his wife, Mary Sasser, have donated their papers to Vanderbilt University’s Special Collections.
“We are deeply grateful that Jim and Mary Sasser, treasured alumni who have devoted their lives to outstanding public service on behalf of Tennessee and the nation, have chosen Vanderbilt as the home for their archives,” Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos said. “Having first-hand information from Jim’s career as a senator and ambassador and from Mary’s work in bridging cultures will offer Vanderbilt scholars an invaluable level of insight into a vital time in our world’s history. These papers will be a pivotal part of the work of researchers for many generations to come in advancing understanding of global affairs.”
“Mary and I have chosen Vanderbilt as the home for our records because in many ways it is where our journey began,” James Sasser said. “We met as students there in the ’50s and the education that it provided us, as undergraduates and then for me as a law student, proved to be the foundation for decades of public service for which we are both enormously grateful. We are hopeful that this record, and all of the stories that it tells, will be useful to future students, scholars and researchers.”

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County Commissioner Donates Kidney, Inspires Others to Do Same

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy said Thursday that he thought he might help a half dozen people by donating a kidney to any stranger who could use it on April 30, reports the Commercial Appeal.
But the chain of kidney recipients that Mulroy’s donation in Memphis triggered stretched much further and much faster than anyone could have hoped.
The chain reaction ended on Wednesday with 28 people across the country receiving kidneys from 28 donors in the five week’s since Mulroy volunteered his kidney at the Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute in Memphis, operated in partnership with the University of Tennessee.
Known as “Chain 221” at the New York-based National Kidney Registry, Mulroy’s was the second-largest chain, only shorter than a 30-recipient string made between August and December 2011, according to the national registry.
“I’m just so gratified that I’ve been able to help so many people in such a dramatic way,” said Mulroy, 49, a University of Memphis law professor.”I had originally hoped that I might help a half of a dozen people, but to know that the chain has grown to 28 — 10 of whom were chronic, desperate people who would not otherwise have received kidneys, I’m must overjoyed.”

Ned McWherter Campaign Donating to Pigeon River Society

News release from Shelby White, spokesman for Mike McWherter:
Newport, TN – On Saturday, August 27th, Mike McWherter, son of late Governor Ned McWherter, will make a financial contribution to the Pigeon River Society from the Friends of Ned McWherter campaign fund at the River Walk Park in downtown Newport at 1:00 p.m. The Pigeon River was at the center of a bi-state controversy between Tennessee and North Carolina during the McWherter governorship.
“My father had a deep appreciation for our state’s natural treasures and the people who worked so diligently to preserve these important resources.” said Mike McWherter. “The Pigeon River issue symbolized his approach to leadership, putting the best interests of our state and citizens above all else. It is a honor and a privilege to continue his legacy in east Tennessee, a place he held so close to his heart.”
The controversy centered around the Champion Paper Mill in Canton, NC located ten miles upstream from the Tennessee state line in Cocke County. For over 80 years, the paper mill had discharged industrial waste into the river, destroying wildlife habitat and recreational areas downstream. Residents of Newport, TN and Hartford, TN complained about the negative economic and health consequences of the pollution, including higher cancer rates in areas along the Pigeon River.
In the late 80’s, opposition to the Champion Paper Mill in Tennessee reached a political boiling point, with newspapers and elected officials calling on Governor McWherter to deny the renewal of a water quality variance needed by the paper mill to continue operations. During the debate, Champion threatened to close the mill and layoff over 2,000 workers, which sparked heated debate across state lines.
Early one September morning, Governor McWherter, legislative aide Billy Stair and an agent from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency loaded up in a canoe just north of the paper mill where the waters were vibrant and pristine. As they floated past the Champion operation, the clear headwaters turned into a black discharge that bubbled around their canoe. Just past the paper mill, a local sheriff stopped the group and informed them they were trespassing on “Champion’s River.” The sheriff did not realize he had stopped the Governor of Tennessee, but he did solidify Gov. McWherter’s decision to deny the variance request. On Christmas Eve of 1988, Gov. McWherter called on his Deputy Governor Harlan Matthews to deliver the news of the variance refusal to North Carolina Governor Jim Martin. Governor McWherter’s refusal of the variance request was met with much praise in Tennessee and solidified his legacy as a steward of Tennessee’s natural resources.

Note: The late Gov. McWherter had kept his old campaign account in place after leaving office, using it to help create a scholarship fund, donate to other political campaigns, buy flowers and the like.