Tag Archives: display

Emancipation Proclamation on Display at TN State Museum

By Kristin Hall, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The original Emancipation Proclamation, a document that changed the lives of countless African-Americans during the Civil War, is on display in Nashville as the fragile historical document makes its only stop in the Southeast on a 150th anniversary tour.
The exhibit opened Tuesday — fittingly on the anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s birthday — at the Tennessee State Museum and runs through Monday. It’s a rare visit outside the nation’s capital for the original document Lincoln signed in 1863 declaring “forever free” all slaves held in Confederate states rebelling against the Union.
Because lights are harmful to the papers, the document can only be viewed for 72 hours over the course of the six days. After Feb. 18, a replica of the Emancipation Proclamation will be on display until the exhibit ends Sept. 1.
Throngs of school children were among the first to view the exhibit on Tuesday morning. All of the approximately 18,000 reservations for visitors and school groups to visit the exhibit were taken, but more walk-in visitors were being accommodated.

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TDOT To Continue Digital Billboard Display of Traffic Deaths in 2013 (but not as often)

News release from state Department of Transportation:
NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) will continue to display fatality messages on its overhead Dynamic Message Signs, but will do so on a weekly basis rather than daily. TDOT began displaying the fatality numbers on the signs in April 2012 after seeing a sharp increase in fatalities in the first quarter of the year.
“We feel the fatality messages have been extremely successful in increasing awareness about highway deaths across the state this year, and may have helped us stop the dramatic increase we saw early in 2012,” said TDOT Commissioner John Schroer. “We have also heard from drivers who say the messages have caused them to make positive changes in their driving behavior.”
While somewhat controversial, the fatality messages have garnered mostly positive responses from Tennessee motorists. A Franklin, TN man emailed to say the signs made an impression on him and his friends, “I have to tell you that none of us ever wore seat belts until we saw those signs. We are all in our 50s and did not grow up wearing seatbelts. Since we saw your signs, we kid each other on how ALL of us always wear them now. You may think people are not paying attention because fatalities are up, but I have talked to so many people that have changed their seatbelt wearing habits since you put those signs up. Thank you.”
TDOT will also continue to run safety messages targeted at specific issues like texting while driving, drowsy driving, and driving under the influence.

Note: Previous post HERE

Original Handwritten Versions of TN Constitutions Come Out of Vault, Go on Display

News release from Administrative Office of the Courts:
Tennessee State Library and Archives staff will carefully move all three versions of the original handwritten Tennessee state Constitutions to the Supreme Court building Tuesday, December 4 in preparation for a five-day public display.
The meticulously preserved documents will be removed from a vault at the State Library and Archives building and carried by hand starting at 10 a.m. Tuesday in their archival boxes next door to the Supreme Court building. A Tennessee Highway Patrol detail will provide security as the state’s most significant documents travel for their first-ever public display as a group.
The largest document – the State Constitution written in 1834 – measures approximately 2′ x 3′.
This is the first time the three documents – handwritten in 1796, 1834 and 1870 – will be on display together for the public to view. The event is part of the 75th anniversary celebration of the Supreme Court Building, which was dedicated in 1937. The celebration also includes the opening of the Tennessee Judiciary Museum within the Supreme Court Building with a public ceremony at 10 a.m. Wednesday, December 5.
Following the period of public exhibition, the original Constitutions will be returned to a vault at the State Library and Archives and digital duplicates will be on display at the Judiciary Museum.
The museum will be open to the public with the original constitutions on display on the following dates and times:
•Thursday, December 6th from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
•Friday, December 7th from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
•Saturday, December 8th from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. to especially allow school children who can’t come during the week to view the constitutions
· Monday, December 10th from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Starting Tuesday, December 11, the museum will be open weekdays from 9 a.m. – Noon. There is no admission charge. The Supreme Court building is at 401 Seventh Ave, Nashville, 37219, at the corner of Charlotte Avenue.

Original Handwritten Versions of TN Constitutions on Display

News release from Administrative Office of the Courts:
NASHVILLE, TN – To celebrate the 75th anniversary of the building that houses the Tennessee Supreme Court, original handwritten versions of the three state constitutions will be on display for the public for the first time.
The display is part of a week-long celebration of the building and includes the opening of the Tennessee Judiciary Museum in a portion of the courthouse’s library at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, December 5th. Also, as part of the celebration, there will be a Judicial Family Reunion of all employees who’ve worked in the building that afternoon. The museum will be open to the public with the original constitutions on display December 6-8 and Monday, December 10th.
“The museum provides a great opportunity for the people of Tennessee to actually see the original founding documents of our state which established our three branches of government and our fundamental constitutional rights,” Tennessee Supreme Court Chief Justice Gary Wade said. “The museum also will tell the story of the Tennessee courts from the perspective of the judges, the lawyers and the litigants. I believe that it will be a treasure for the people of Tennessee for generations to come.”

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Jonesborough Latest to Plan 10 Commandments Display

JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (AP) — The city of Jonesborough is considering utilizing a law that allows public buildings to display “historically significant documents,” such as the Ten Commandments.
The Johnson City Press (http://bit.ly/KB1zKp) reports that Washington County commissioners unanimously approved a resolution on Monday that authorizes the county to form a committee that would design and recommend the documents for possible display in the George P. Jaynes Justice Center.
The law allows documents to be displayed in the form of statues, monuments, memorials, tablets or in any other way that in the words of the legislation “respects the dignity and solemnity of such documents.”
Besides the Ten Commandments, other possible documents include the Magna Carta, Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution.
The U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals has stated counties that act with a predominate purpose of advancing religion in placing a monument or plaques that includes the Ten Commandments would violate the Constitution.
County Attorney John Rambo said the resolution was not about the placement of the Ten Commandments, and that a letter he wrote to commissioners earlier this month was aimed at explaining legal interpretations and possible constitutional ramifications for doing so.
“The government activity in establishing a historical documents display for county courthouses is allowed only if it has a secular purpose; it must not have a primary effect of advancing or inhibiting religion, or foster an excessive entanglement with religion,” Rambo wrote.