Tag Archives: delegates

Wolfe Loses Court Appeal for Arkansas Delegates

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A federal appeals court has dismissed the appeal of a Tennessee lawyer who was denied Arkansas delegates despite winning 42 percent of the vote in the Democratic Party’s presidential primary.
The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed John Wolfe’s appeal on Wednesday, the day after President Barack Obama was re-elected.
The court says Wolfe didn’t respond to an order last month.
Wolfe filed a notice of appeal in federal court last month after a federal judge dismissed his lawsuit against the Arkansas Democratic Party.
The judge said Wolfe couldn’t prove that the state party violated his rights when it refused to award him any delegates.
The party says Wolfe didn’t follow party rules.
Wolfe didn’t respond to a phone message left Wednesday.

Notes on Tennesseans at the Democratic National Convention

Believing in President Obama
Tennessee delegates to the Democratic National Convention are supportive of President Obama despite what pollsters describe as an “enthusiasm gap” between Democrats and Republicans this year, reports Michael Collins in a setup story on the state’s representatives to the Charlotte gathering.
“It’s really fascinating,” Gloria Johnson, a delegate from Knoxville, said of the convention experience. “You’re sitting there, and there is George Stephanopoulos four seats down. There are all these people there, and nobody cares. We are all there to nominate the person we want to be president.”
Four years ago, Johnson attended her first political convention. She had never been involved in a political party or politics, yet she was so inspired by Obama that she became politically active. Now, she’s chairwoman of the Knox County Democratic Party and a candidate for the state House of Representatives.
Like Dayton and other Obama believers, Johnson was convinced four years ago that as president he would bring about much-needed changes. In her view, he has.
He got health care reform passed, ended the “don’t ask don’t tell” ban on gays serving openly in the msitary, signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act into law and offered a stimulus package that created millions of private sector jobs, Johnson said

Ashley Judd: Star of the TN Show
Entertainer Ashley Judd, a Tennessee delegate to the convention, tells the Tennessean she’s a dedicated activist.
“I’ve been a Democrat for a very long time,” Judd said. “Family lore says that my beloved great-aunt, Pauline, who lived on a farm in Lawrence County in Eastern Kentucky, named all her dogs after Democrats.”
This week Judd, a famous actress, activist and Williamson County resident, is taking her partisanship to a new level as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. She’s an at-large member of the Tennessee delegation and a campaign surrogate for President Barack Obama, speaking to supporters on his behalf.
And she says her ties to the party run even deeper than those born of family lore.
“The party platform is one of a social justice gospel and faith. It became my party based on a sense of equality and fairness, hard work and advocating for people living at and below the poverty line and helping them strive toward our fabled middle class.”

Clayton Takes a Swat at the Chair
While party unity is a theme at the Democratic convention, Michael Cass reports that disavowed U.S. Senate nominee, Mark Clayton, wasn’t on board, providing a pre-convention parting shot at Tennessee’s party chairman.
Clayton released a lengthy statement Friday that attacked Forrester (without ever daring to mention his name) and the party for supporting gay marriage, saying that stance puts the Democratic establishment out of step with most voters.
“The current TNDP chairman and staff are finding themselves politically isolated and left to represent, with taxpayer funds, the fringe of anti-family, anti-constitution zero-sum politics in Tennessee all the while making President Obama look like a far right-winger by comparison to themselves,” the statement said.
“Mark Clayton always got along fine with previous TNDP chairmen. But in contrast, the current TNDP chairman and his staff who despise Mark do not represent mainstream Democrats in Tennessee and are far to the fringe and far away from even President Obama’s comparatively conservative view on the Constitution and marriage issues.”

The Memphis Mood
Bart Sullivan has commentary from West Tennessee delegates to the convention:
City of Memphis police legal adviser and lawyer Zayid Saleem will be attending his first convention after being elected to the Shelby County Democratic Executive Committee. Saleem said he recognizes that Tennessee has gone for the Republican presidential candidate the last two cycles but “we still need to motivate people to get out (to vote) across the state. You never know what will happen.”
Seeing Obama at the 73,778-seat Bank of America Stadium Thursday night will be a highlight, he said. “It’s historic to actually be a part of the process.”
Kelly Jacobs of Hernando is driving her bronze Prius — decked out with re-elect Obama signs and Christmas lights — to the convention, her third after former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean’s run got her charged up in 2004.
While she’s excited to be among other Obama-Biden supporters, she’s disappointed at the decision not to let Dean or Obama’s chief rival in 2008, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, make podium speeches. She also said she had a pile of invitations five inches high by this time four and eight years ago, but now invitations come by e-mail and she wonders if elderly delegates who don’t use computers will miss out.

On Tennessean’s Challenge to Obama in Louisana (12% not enough for delegates)

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A Tennessee lawyer who finished a distant second to President Barack Obama in Louisiana’s Democratic primary in March won’t get any Louisiana delegates to the party’s national convention.
The state Democratic Party says John Wolfe failed to comply with the party’s delegate selection plan. He missed deadlines to certify an authorized representative for his campaign in the state and to provide a necessary statement of participation to the state party.
Wolfe got almost 12 percent of the statewide vote. Analysts said he would have earned an estimated three delegates, based on his totals in some congressional districts. Louisiana would have been one of the only states where Democratic delegates would have gone to an Obama opponent.
Wolfe didn’t return a call placed to his Chattanooga phone number Monday.
Louisiana sends 71 delegates to the national convention. Sixty-four will be pledged to Obama. Seven “super delegates” are uncommitted but they include prominent state party leaders, including chairman Buddy Leach and U. S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, who are considered certain to support Obama.
Wolfe was one of three little-known challengers to Obama on the March 24 ballot. Wolfe, on his campaign website, says Obama is too cozy with Wall Street and corporate interests and says corporate tax rates are too low.

Note: Wolfe was the Democratic nominee against Chuck Fleischmann in the 2010 3rd Congressional District election He had previously run unsuccessfully for various other offices, including the Tennessee state Senate and Chattanooga mayor. He was also on the presidential ballot in New Hampshire earlier this year.

Romney Halfway to Clinching GOP Nomination — SortaThanks to TN

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mitt Romney is halfway to clinching the Republican nomination for president.
The former Massachusetts governor inched up to 572 delegates on Monday — exactly half the 1,144 needed — after the Tennessee Republican Party finalized delegate totals from its March 6 primary. Results in several congressional districts were too close to call on election night, leaving three delegates unallocated.
Romney got all three delegates. He also picked up an endorsement from a New Hampshire delegate who had been awarded to former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman. Huntsman dropped out of the race in January and endorsed Romney.
Romney and his chief rival, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, have been sparring over the delegate count for weeks. Romney’s campaign says there is no way for Santorum to reach the number of delegates needed to clinch the nomination, portraying the race as all but over. Santorum’s campaign says Romney’s numbers are inflated, raising the prospect of a contested convention in August.
According to the Associated Press tally, Romney has more than twice as many delegates as Santorum. Santorum has 273 delegates, followed by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich with 135 and Texas Rep. Ron Paul with 50.
Romney has won 54 percent of the primary and caucus delegates so far, putting him on pace to clinch the nomination in June. Romney could substantially add to his lead Tuesday, when 95 delegates will be at stake in three primaries, in Wisconsin, Maryland and the District of Columbia.
Tuesday’s contests mark the midway point in the race for delegates.
A total of 2,286 delegates are slated to attend the party’s national convention in Tampa, Fla. — 2,169 will be selected through primaries, caucuses and state conventions, while 117 are members of the Republican National Committee, free to support any candidate they choose.
Santorum, who has won 27 percent of the primary and caucus delegates so far, would need 74 percent of the remaining delegates to clinch the nomination before the national convention. Gingrich would need 86 percent and Paul would have to win nearly all of them, which won’t happen because most states award delegates proportionally.

Santorum Gets 29 TN Delegates Under Final Super Tuesday Count

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum won half of Tennessee’s delegates to the Republican National Convention from Super Tuesday presidential primary voting this month, according to the Tennessean report from the state GOP after results were certified Thursday.
Santorum won 29 of the 55 committed delegates, easily outpacing former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney’s 17 and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s nine. The state’s final three delegates — the state party chairman, RNC national committeewoman and RNC national committeeman — are uncommitted.
U.S. Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, the other remaining contender for the Republican nomination, did not win any delegates. Santorum won eight of the state’s nine congressional districts on March 6, trailing Romney only in the Memphis-based 9 District.
With each district offering three delegates, Santorum took home two in each of the districts he won, plus one in the 9th, for a total of 17 of a possible 27. He added those to the 12 at-large delegates he had already picked up out of 28 that were available.
Romney finished second to Santorum in six of those eight congressional districts, including the Nashville-based 5th and the 7th, which includes Williamson County.

On the Delegate Selection Process in Tennessee

Fifty-five Tennessee delegates to the Republican National Convention will be chosen in Tuesday’s statewide voting, while the state’s 91 delegates to the Democratic National Convention will be chosen through a convention procedure.
Republicans thus have several potential decisions to make on the statewide ballot as they choose between both presidential candidates and delegates.
Democrats on the other hand have only one candidate on the presidential primary ballot — Barack Obama — and no delegate decisions.
In the GOP process, 55 of the 58 total Tennessee delegates will be bound to vote on the first two convention ballots for a designated presidential candidate. The three exceptions are state Chairman Chris Devaney, National Committeeman John Ryder and National Committeewoman Peggy Lambert — all who get their delegate slots automatically by virtue of their position. Under party rules, they are free to vote for anyone they wish.

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Romney Leads In Lining Up Delegates for TN Presidential Primary

Four of the nine Republican candidates in Tennessee’s presidential primary ballot will have no committed delegates on the ballot with them on the March 6 ballot, while Mitt Romney has a surplus wanting to represent him at the Republican National Convention.
Candidates Newt Gingrich, Ron Paul and Rick Perry also had a substantial slate of committed delegates on the ballot to qualify before the deadline earlier this month. Candidate Jon Huntsman has three — two of them being former Knoxville Mayor Victor Ashe and his wife, Joan.
Tennessee Republicans will elect delegates as well as choose their favorite as the party nominee March 6, though that part of the election gets relatively little attention. The candidates without delegates on the Tennessee ballot — Michelle Bachmann, Gary Johnson, Charles “Buddy” Roemer and Rick Santorum — can still win them at the polls and have delegates appointed later by the state Republican Executive Committee under party rules.
But getting delegates on the ballot does at least speak somewhat to a candidate’s organizational effort in the state, said Tennessee Republican Chairman Chris Devaney, who stresses his neutrality in the primary.
“I do think it shows a certain amount of organization on the part of the candidates who have gotten a good number of delegate candidates to run,” he said. “That certainly shows there’s a level of organization and that they’re thinking beyond the early primaries.”

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TN Democrats Adopt Plan for Selecting Delegates to 2012 Convention

News release from Tennessee Democratic Party:
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Democrats have adopted a Delegate Selection Plan for the 2012 Democratic National Convention, Tennessee Democratic Party Chair Chip Forrester announced today.
“Becoming a delegate to the 2012 Democratic National Convention is an exciting, straightforward process that is open to all Democrats,” said Forrester. “We encourage all Democrats who would like to attend the National Convention to review the plan and begin campaigning to become a Delegate or Alternate.”
The Delegate Selection Plan is available at www.tndp.org or by calling 615-327-9779.
The Delegate Selection Plan was adopted by the Tennessee Democratic Party executive committee following a 30-day comment period on the plan.
The Delegate Selection Plan describes how the Tennessee Democratic Party will select its delegates to the 2012 Democratic National Convention to be held Sept. 3 – 6, 2012 in Charlotte, N.C.
SELECTION PLAN DETAILS
Tennessee will be allotted 91 delegates to the 2012 Democratic National Convention.
Tennessee will use a proportional representation system based on the results of the Primary apportioning its delegates to the 2012 Democratic National Convention.
The “first determining step” of Tennessee’s delegate selection process will occur on March 6, 2012 with a Primary.
District-level delegates and alternates will be elected by a convention system with two-tiers: county conventions and congressional district conventions.
All delegates to the congressional district conventions must be elected at the county conventions, and all District level delegates and alternates must be elected at the congressional district conventions.
The Delegate Selection Plan outlines the requirements for individuals wishing to run for delegate to the Democratic National Convention and the guidelines to which the Tennessee State Democratic Party must adhere throughout the delegate selection process.
The Plan includes Affirmative Action provisions designed to make the delegate-selection process accessible to all Tennessee Democrats. The Plan also includes provisions for selecting Standing Committee members, the delegation chair, convention pages, and challenges to the plan, implementation and specific delegates.