Tag Archives: cream

Mayfield Concedes to Fleischman (‘sour grapes’ ice cream?)

Scottie Mayfield gave up the fight Friday and conceded the 3rd Congressional District Republican primary to U.S. Rep. Chuck Fleischmann, reports Chris Carroll.
“Tomorrow I’m going to get on my tractor for the first time in four months,” the runner-up said Friday. “I’m ready to get back to the old normalcy as opposed to the more recent normalcy.”
The dairy executive’s concession clears the way for Fleischmann to run against Democratic nominee Mary Headrick. Independent candidate and Army veteran Matthew Deniston also will be on the Nov. 6 general election ballot.
Mayfield phoned the freshman congressman Friday afternoon. The call came half a day after Mayfield promised Thursday night to challenge Hamilton County’s results “first thing” in the morning.
Several bleary-eyed Fleischmann staffers converged on the Hamilton County Election Commission as it opened at 8 a.m. Friday, brainstorming a response to Mayfield’s expected appearance.
“This is all about a new flavor of Mayfield ice cream — ‘Sour Grapes,'” Fleischmann Chief of Staff Chip Saltsman joked while waiting.
The aides waited for several hours, but Mayfield never showed up.
Mayfield initially declined to concede the race because, he said, private polling in recent days showed him doing much better in Hamilton County than he actually did when the votes were counted.
Weston Wamp won Hamilton County by 101 votes, and it was the only county in the district that Mayfield didn’t win or finish second. Instead he came in third, 19 percentage points and 6,000 votes behind Wamp.
Mayfield lost by a similar number of votes districtwide and declined to concede Thursday “because it sounds like someone may have made a mistake” in Hamilton County, he said
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Anti-Mayfield Ice Cream Ad, Financed by Outside PAC, Stirs Flap

A new independent expenditure ad in the 3rd Congressional District race says Scottie Mayfield is “good at ice cream, not so good on the issues.”
Mayfield campaign consultant Tommy Hopper, a former state Republican chairman, tells Chris Carroll that he thinks the ad sponsors got that line from Chip Saltsman, another former state GOP chief who is running the Chuck Fleischman campaign.
Coordination between the PAC running the ad and the Fleischmann campaign, of course, would violate federal campaign laws. Hopper suspects that’s what happened. Saltsman says not so.
“We simply do not believe that an out-of-state PAC with no known ties to Tennessee has any interest in our primary unless led here by one of our opponents,” Hopper said.
…Bankrolled by the Beaufort, S.C.-based Citizens for a Working America, the $165,000 ad campaign is the second time an independent, out-of-state political committee has spent money on the 3rd District primary.
Airing in Chattanooga and Knoxville broadcast markets, the anti-Mayfield ad includes an instrumental version of “Pop Goes the Weasel” and melting vanilla ice cream — direct hits on the dairy executive’s intelligence and political savvy.
“Scottie Mayfield: Good at ice cream, not so good on the issues,” the ad’s narrator concludes.
Mayfield’s advisers said recent remarks offered by Fleischmann chief of staff Chip Saltsman shed doubt on the campaign’s denials.
According to audio obtained by the Chattanooga Times Free Press, Saltsman, speaking for Fleischmann at a rally last week in Campbell County, said, “good ice cream, bad politics” in a rhetorical swipe against Mayfield.
“Chip’s comments are oddly similar to the overall theme of the ad,” Hopper said in an email, “and it’s a fact that the Fleischmann campaign plays fast and loose with the law and the facts.”
Saltsman laughed when greeted with Hopper’s allegation, adding that he has no ties to Citizens for a Working America.
“Don’t know them. But I’ve heard that comment about Mayfield having good milk or ice cream and bad politics or issues 100 times,” he said. “It’s something a lot of people say. A lot of people talk about it.”
The other independent expenditure came from the American Conservative Union, a Washington, D.C.-based organization that spent at least $30,000 on a July radio buy in support of Fleischmann.
Records show OnMessage Inc., an ad agency in Virginia, produced both ads.
Saltsman and OnMessage Inc. co-founder Brad Todd are Facebook friends, but the connections go beyond that. Saltsman was elected Tennessee Republican Party chairman in 1998, and Todd was the state party’s executive director in 1997-98, according to his LinkedIn page.
Todd did not return phone calls, but Saltsman said the two briefly worked together.
“He was at the party when I was elected, but I replaced him,” Saltsman said. Saltsman denied coordination and said he hasn’t spoken with Todd “since last winter.”
Paul S. Ryan, senior counsel at the Campaign Legal Center in Washington, D.C., said it’s difficult to prove “coordination” even though the Federal Election Commission has subpoena power over such matters.
…A $475,000 ad buy for Mitt Romney in December 2011 is the only other expenditure Citizens for a Working America has ever made, records show. As of Thursday, the organization was listed as based in Dayton, Ohio, but on Friday that was changed to Beaufort, S.C.
Despite requests from the Federal Election Commission to do so, Citizens for a Working America has not disclosed its donors. Norm Cummings, a Virginia-based Republican political consultant whose name is on the organization’s filings, could not be reached for comment.

Scottie Mayfield: ‘People Like Ice Cream’

Republican Scottie Mayfield, running for the 3rd Congressional District nomination,says he thinks that giving voters ice cream — Mayfield brand, paid for by the campaign, naturally — is a better way to communicate than participating in debates.
His comments are part of a Georgiana Vines overview story on the congressional campaign. Mayfield, who has declined to participate in debates, also says he would never have run had not redistricting moved his McMinn County home out of the 2nd District, whre Rep. John J. “Jimmy” Duncan Jr. is the incumbent — not Chuck Fleischmann.
“I would not want to replace him (Duncan(. I think he is doing a good job,” Mayfield said in an interview in Knoxville on Wednesday. When the district changed, “a door opened for me,” he said.
He responded to criticism for not attending the debates in Chattanooga by saying that he didn’t think they would prove differences between the candidates.
…”I’ve watched the presidential debates. They are so divisive. I don’t think the candidates say a great deal,” he said. He also didn’t want to become divisive himself, he said.
Pointing to a flyer listing his positions on seven issues, he said all of the Republican candidates with a few word changes seem the same with one exception — term limits. He favors members of the House and Senate each serving 12 years, he said.
…While not attending the tea party debate, Mayfield said he went to two other events in the district in Polk and Campbell counties and reached 600 people — more than attended the debate.
He said he prefers to have the opportunity to meet with people one-on-one, find out what they’re interested in and listen. Often, initially, they’re a little standoffish, he said.
“Give them some ice cream and they settle in and get comfortable,” he said. “People like ice cream.”