Tag Archives: cordell

State Evaluating Bids for relocating displaced employees

Bids under seal with state officials could move the first workers out of the Cordell Hull Building and into private office space by March of next year, reports The Tennessean.
Six firms, including Lifeway Christian Resources and Bellsouth Telecommunications LLC, have submitted offers to lease out space for 301 workers in the Department of Children’s Services. The state plans to settle on a deal no later than Aug. 19.
The offers were made last week under a bidding process that also names Jones Lang LaSalle as the state’s broker, giving the Chicago real estate firm a 4 percent commission if a deal is closed.
The Department of General Services has refused to release information about the offers — apart from the bidders’ names — until a winner is chosen and a recommendation sent to the State Building Commission. Officials maintain that the state’s open records law allows them to accept real estate bids under seal.
About 1,000 state workers currently work in Cordell Hull, a nine-story office block next to the state Capitol. Citing a review done by Jones Lang LaSalle, state officials say water persistently seeps into the nearly 60-year-old building. They say it would cost the state more than $24 million to keep Cordell Hull in service.
Lawmakers approved a state budget in April that included funding to shut down Cordell Hull, an annex called the Central Services Building, the Tennessee Regulatory Authority’s headquarters and three other state buildings in Chattanooga and Memphis.


See also the Chattanooga TFP, which reports on six sealed bids for housing displaced Chattanooga state employees.

Legislators Question Cordell Hull Building Demolition

A plan to demolish the Cordell Hull Building faced questions Tuesday from legislators lawmakers concerned about the historical value of the building and future plans for the site next to the Capitol, reports The Tennessean.
Members of the House Finance Committee sought assurances at a budget meeting that Department of General Services officials would consider other ways to dispose of the 60-year-old building on 5th Avenue North and would not sell the land beneath it to private developers.
One member, state Rep. Matthew Hill, R-Jonesborough, also questioned the decision to tear down the building and five others across Tennessee at a time when thousands of state employees work in leased office space.
“Do we not want to make sure those leases are concluded before we go tearing down buildings?” he asked. The Haslam administration has proposed tearing down the Cordell Hull Building, arguing that the Truman-era building has grown obsolete and would cost $24 million to rehabilitate, far more than its actual value.
The Haslam administration has proposed tearing down the Cordell Hull Building, arguing that the Truman-era building has grown obsolete and would cost $24 million to rehabilitate, far more than its actual value.
General Services Commissioner Steve Cates told lawmakers that one of the building’s main flaws is a leaky foundation that, because of its massive size, would be difficult to repair.