Tag Archives: carey

TN History for Kids Offering New Booklets for Schools

By Travis Lollar, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — For years, Tennessee history buff Bill Carey has been concerned about the lack of state history in the schools. Now he is seizing what he thinks is the best opportunity in decades to reverse that trend.
Carey is taking advantage of the state’s adoption of the Common Core standards that require English and reading teachers to make use of more nonfiction.
His nonprofit, Tennessee History for Kids, has created two booklets for use in those classes. One is for elementary and middle school children and is composed mostly of historical essays written by Carey with titles like “David Crockett loses his pants.”
“That’s the first one my kids wanted to read,” said Teresa Calhoun, who recently purchased a set of the booklets for her classroom. The fourth grade teacher at Indian Springs Elementary School in Kingsport said the booklets use stories to tell history.
“That makes it fun and interesting,” she said. It’s not like a regular textbook.”

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Some Tennessee History News Notes

Old Newspapers to Be Displayed
This fall, a time and date to be determined, the Walter T. and Julia Pulliam Historic Newspaper Collection will be dedicated and put on exhibit in ceremonies at Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate.
The Pulliam archives include about 900 newspapers assembled in a half-century or more of hunting down not only rare national and world newspapers, but also editions that illustrate daily snapshots of life in various East Tennessee communities. Some of the more important newspapers date to as far back as the 1600s.

Fred Brown’s story is a recommended read for Tennessee history buffs, not only for notes on the historic newspapers but for the recounting of Walter Pulliam’s personal history as a reporter and small town Tennessee newspaper editor.
Historical Misinformation About Murfreesboro?
William Lytle, an early Rutherford County landowner, figures prominently in most accounts of the founding of Murfreesboro. Much of what is said, however, is incorrect. A Murfreesboro Daily News Journal column breaks it down.
Bill Carey History Columns Now Online
Bill Carey, a former Tennessean reporter and Metro Pulse editor who runs Tennessee History for Kids, has set up links to his Tennessee history columns in Tennessee magazine (an electric cooperative publication that isn’t available online). You’ll find the listing HERE.

Will Legislature move to overturn another Supreme Court ruling?

Nashville attorney Ted Carey, writing a Tennessean op-ed piece, explains a recent state Supreme Court ruling that could help injured patients win medical malpractice (‘med-mal’) lawsuits against doctors and other health care providers. It involves a legal technicality on admitting evidence, called the “locality rule.”
But Carey also notes that the ruling could play into politics at the Legislature, where the trend has been to make it more difficult to collect damages from doctors and other health care providers. And there’s the legislative moves that some lawyers see as attacks on the state’s courts — the move to return to popular election of the state’s top judges and to have legislators, not the Supreme Court, choose a majority of members on the Court of the Judiciary.
Excerpt from Carey’s article on the “Shipley” ruling:
Finally, there is larger politics. Legislative changes to overall tort laws, and to medical malpractice laws, in 2009 and 2011, already have been followed by significant drops in med-mal case filings, with parallel reductions in malpractice insurance premiums.
In 2009, pre-case-filing requirements were enacted by the General Assembly. Caps on damages followed in 2011. Before Shipley, the state’s doctors appeared satisfied with these steps. The doctors’ lobby planned no push for further changes in the laws in 2012, wanting to see how much difference these changes would make, once the caps take effect during late 2011.
But depending on how Shipley is viewed, the Republican legislative majority might seek to overrule Shipley by statute. The General Assembly did just that last session to another Tennessee Supreme Court decision it didn’t like — dealing with the overall standard for summary judgments. Koch says Shipley further tinkers with that same summary-judgment standard.
So is Shipley a red flag in front of the legislative bull, if you will? Or is Holder’s nothing-unusual-going-on-here concurrence right? The justices are all up for retention elections next year. What would Chicken Little say?