Tag Archives: Alzheimer’s

Ted Welch Switches Role inTennessee GOP Fundraising

Ted Welch, the man who has served as a central thread connecting the characters and campaigns of the now-dominant Tennessee Republican Party is entering a new phase, reports The Tennessean.
At 79, diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease eight months ago, he is moving from the role of organizer of the party’s grandest events to honoree.
As his longtime friend (Lamar) Alexander gears up for a run at a third term in the U.S. Senate, Welch isn’t the one making calls to ensure the senator rakes in another $1 million during the next quarter.
Instead, the honorary finance chairman of Alexander’s re-election bid (the other being embattled Pilot Flying J CEO Jimmy Haslam) is the subject of the senator’s next fundraiser, a “Salute to Ted Welch,” set for Tuesday in Williamson County.
“Every other time, he’s been organizing,” Alexander said, looking back at his numerous campaigns.
Welch, a former door-to-door Bible salesman and master of the fundraising phone call — a not-so-easy task for even the most seasoned politicos — stuck to a pretty simple formula: one call after another, flipping through a Rolodex, as he turned personal and political connections into money.
For more than four decades, Welch has played GOP fundraiser extraordinaire: from Gov. Winfield Dunn’s victory in 1970 to Alexander’s gubernatorial and Senate triumphs, to the more recent victories of Gov. Bill Haslam and Sen. Bob Corker. In between have been Sens. Howard Baker, Bill Brock, Bill Frist and Fred Thompson, and new Republicans at the state level, such as House Speaker Beth Harwell.
…”If you’ve ever thought about running for politics in 30 years and you have not gone to have a conversation with Ted, you’re not doing it right,” said Bryan Kaegi, Alexander’s fundraiser and a Welch admirer.
Kaegi — along with his sister, Kim Kaegi, Corker’s chief fundraiser — is part of the next generation of Republican fundraisers who fall under the Welch tree. Another is Agnes Warfield, current fundraiser for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a woman called both the “Money Maven” and “The Money Lady.”

Corker: ‘My Dad Had Alzheimer’s, so I Understand’

News release from Sen. Bob Corker (posted belatedly):
WASHINGTON – Today U.S. Senator Herb Kohl (D-WI), Chairman of the Senate Special Committee on Aging, and U.S. Senator Bob Corker (R-TN), the committee’s ranking member, released an official committee report that offers a comparison of international approaches to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia care.
The report examined five countries–Australia, France, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States–and their approaches to diagnosis, treatment and long-term care options for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and their family members. The other countries were chosen because they have similar economies to the U.S. and highlight different aspects of the Alzheimer’s challenge for policy makers.
“Alzheimer’s disease is a growing national concern and we must commit to addressing it in the most comprehensive way possible. There are enormous costs, both personal and financial to this disease,” said Chairman Kohl. “We urgently need to prepare for the increasing number of Alzheimer’s diagnoses, and how to curb this mounting epidemic.”
“My father had Alzheimer’s, so I understand the emotional and financial difficulties facing families dealing with this devastating illness. I hope this report will help inform the debate in our country over how to provide the best care possible given the significant budgetary and health care challenges presented by increasing cases of Alzheimer’s,” said ranking member Corker.
This report highlights the global efforts to coordinate research and early detection interventions. It also underscores an increasing trend to keep Alzheimer’s patients in their homes for as long as possible, while developing more specialized environments for those who need intensive around-the-clock care.
The Alzheimer’s Association (AA) estimates that in the next 40 years, the cost of Alzheimer’s disease to all payers, including governments, insurance companies and individuals, will total $20 trillion. AA also estimates that 15 million Americans provide unpaid care for those with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, valued at $210 billion. In 2012 alone, Alzheimer’s patients and families spent an estimated $33 billion in out-of-pocket costs. Furthermore, in the last year, Alzheimer’s disease cost $104.5 billion to Medicare and $33.5 billion to Medicaid. These expenses are expected to rise 500 percent over the next four decades.
Since its inception, the Senate Special Committee on Aging has focused on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia as critical public health problems. The committee has held a series of hearings on the disease and has heard testimony from prominent voices, such as former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, on the importance of continued research, vigilance and appropriate care.

Note: The full report is HERE.