Democrats Bash Roe on Stimulus Funding

U.S. Rep. Phil, R-Tenn., is one of more than 120 House Republicans who voted against the 2009 economic recovery package and then sought stimulus funds, according to the Kingsport Times-News, citing a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) claim.
Last week, Roe presented Takoma Regional Hospital officials in Greeneville with a $1.3 million stimulus check as partial reimbursement for the hospital’s investment in electronic health records. Afterward, the Tennessee Democratic Party fired off an e-mail to news media outlets calling the check award a “hypocritical handout.”
The TDP e-mail said: “Congressman Roe doesn’t want to spend taxpayer dollars but he’s happy to dole it out. This is exactly the kind of sham leadership that has Tennesseans so frustrated with the Republican Congress.”
When contacted for a response, Roe said in an e-mail: “You can’t spend over $816 billion dollars and not do some good things. But the real question is, was the stimulus legislation a waste of taxpayer dollars? ”
http://www.timesnews.net/article/9040614/democrats-slam-roe-as-hypocrite-for-handing-out-funds-from-stimulus
Until now, new charter schools in Tennessee got between $600,000 and $700,000 in federal grants to cover startup costs in their first three years, including big-ticket items such as building leases. But the money has dried up reports the Commercial Appeal.
“It’s a significant strain to say the least,” said Freedom Prep principal Roblin Webb. “That’s the money you use to find and lease facilities, pay your teachers. “We could not have started without the money. This is huge.”
Former Memphis mayor Willie Herenton expects he will have to delay opening of several of the seven charter schools he hoped to open in the fall of 2012 in Orleans Elementary, Manassas High and Booker T. Washington High in Memphis.
“In all candor, I was shocked to hear the new startups would not have necessary ingredients to launch new programs,” he said. He plans to seek funding from philanthropic and corporate sources.
For years, Tennessee charter operators got $225,000 to use the year before the school opened, followed by another $250,000 to cover operational costs before state per-pupil tax money began flowing to the schools, said Rich Haglund, director of charter schools at the state Department of Education.
“If a school opened with 100 students, they would get one-tenth of their (Basic Education Program tax funds) that August. That is not going to pay their operational costs,” he said.

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