Haslam May Seek Waiver to Federal ‘No Child Left Behind’ Standards

Acknowledging the “very real possibility” that many Tennessee schools cannot meet current federal “No Child Left Behind” standards, Gov. Bill Haslam said today that his administration may seek a waiver from federal officials.
Haslam said he is currently involved in “discussions on what those waivers might look like.” In an interview last week, he said he has worked with Sen. Lamar Alexander on the matter.
“So many schools are not going to meet the standards that something’s going to have to be done,” said Haslam.
President Obama has asked Congress to overhaul the law, but there has been no action. Haslam said in the earlier interview that things appear to be deadlocked in Washington.
Under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, enacted at the urging of former President George W. Bush, schools are measured by the progress students make on state tests. Those failing to show adequate progress for two consecutive years are designated as “failing,” and can ultimately lose federal funding.
Also, schools designated as failing must offer federally-approved after-school tutoring services and allow students to transfer to other schools while paying any costs involved.
Under NCLB, standards rise every three years. As now written, states have until 2014 to achieve 100 percent proficiency in all tested subject plus a 90 percent graduation rate.
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has said he anticipates most schools nationwide will fail to meet those standards.

One thought on “Haslam May Seek Waiver to Federal ‘No Child Left Behind’ Standards

  1. Eric Holcombe

    Easiest waiver and path to freedom: just say no to the 17% of funding coming from the federal government. Think of the cost savings with ALL federal requirements removed.
    “he anticipates most schools nationwide will fail to meet those standards.”
    Failure by design. Cue the band for the Common Core State(ist) Standards. Read up on Charlotte Iserbyt. It’s an old playbook.

Leave a Reply