Woman, 78, about to lose place she's called home for 56 years

Mary Cate Jones packs personal items inside her living room Tuesday, May. 15, 2012 in the home she and her husband Kenneth built 56 years ago.  Jones, 78, has received notice that at 8 a.m. Wednesday she will be evicted and the doors padlocked.  Jones, with the help of family and friends, packed her belongings for movement to a storage unit.   (MICHAEL PATRICK/NEWS SENTINEL)

Photo by Michael Patrick, copyright © 2012

Mary Cate Jones packs personal items inside her living room Tuesday, May. 15, 2012 in the home she and her husband Kenneth built 56 years ago. Jones, 78, has received notice that at 8 a.m. Wednesday she will be evicted and the doors padlocked. Jones, with the help of family and friends, packed her belongings for movement to a storage unit. (MICHAEL PATRICK/NEWS SENTINEL)

Mary Cate Jones on being evicted from her home

STRAWBERRY PLAINS — Seventy-eight-year-old Mary Cate Jones of Strawberry Plains, frail and in declining health, is scheduled to be evicted this morning from the quaint 1,000-square-foot Langston Road house she has lived in since 1956.

Barring unforeseen last-minute developments, Jones will no longer live in the home that she and her late husband, Kenneth Jones, built with their own hands.

Jones' daughter, Carol White, said she just learned recently that her mother took out a $60,000 loan against the home in 2007. White said her mother, who had open-heart surgery three years ago, fell behind with the payments and the home went into foreclosure.

"I didn't know (about the loan) and had no idea this had taken place until a month ago Thursday," said White, a longtime teacher at the Rush Strong School for pupils grades K-8 in Strawberry Plains.

Cate Jones, whose husband died in 2000 at age 65, said she expects this morning to be emotional as she leaves the house for the last time.

"That's pretty tough," she said.

"We built it (the house), and my daddy helped us some too. It has just floored me. I've been a nervous wreck."

White said her parents were typical of the pay-as-you go generation and never had financial problems.

"Mother and Dad never even had a mortgage," explained White.

"They paid for the materials for the house as they built it, and got a lot of the wood for the house off Grandfather's farm.

"Mother was plenty capable and had always taken care of everything and everybody. Mother took out the mortgage against the home to make repairs — including a new roof."

Three other family members living in the home, Jones' disabled son, Kenny, and his children Bryce, 16, and Molly, 14, also will be displaced.

All of the family members are moving in with White, who was busy trying to pack as many items as possible Tuesday before eviction.

"It's the only thing I can do," said White.

"They'll move in with me, my husband and my younger brother. My problem is my brother Kenny had polio as a child, and I have steps all over my house.

"It's so sad when you look at Mom's age. She can't even talk about it."

Since finding out about her mother's delinquent loan, Jones said she has been bogged down in red tape, trying to track down the holders of the mortgage and attempting to find a solution.

She said her mother's declining mental faculties have also made it difficult to iron out the problem.

"In the last six or eight months me and my two younger brothers have noticed a big change in her. Things that were so easy for Mom have been so difficult."

White even attempted, unsuccessfully, to withdraw her teacher's state retirement fund early and pay off the home loan.

She said tracking down the trail of her mother's mortgage has been an exercise in forensics.

"Over time, they sold the loan out and I've had a hard time finding out about it," said White.

"I've felt like a little fish in a sea of bureaucrats. To my knowledge, Wilson & Associates of Little Rock, Ark., is over the eviction process. They have the deed to the house and the five acres."

Crystal Stelly, a self-employed eviction specialist who was hired by a local Realtor to handle Jones' removal, called the situation "heartbreaking."

In fact, for the first time in almost 10 years as an eviction specialist, Stelly said she was unable to expedite her job.

"I'm not going to do it," said Stelly.

"That woman is too old and fragile to be put out on the street and set on the curb. All I could think about was what if that was my grandmother in that situation?

"I know it's a job, but all money is not good money. It's morally wrong."

Cate Jones wondered what she could have done differently.

"Some of it was my fault," she said.

"I kept sending payments, but it wasn't the same (mortgage) company. They kept changing. The people from Arkansas who have it now have never spoken to me whatsoever."

White said the ordeal has been a nightmare.

"It's unbelievable," she said."It's the process that seems so wrong."

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Comments » 89

Caneoverthere writes:

Poor lady, what a shame.

Caneoverthere writes:

The money changers are loving this; for pennies on the dollar they move the shells around long enough to pick up the property and make some Real money.

TheTime writes:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

GeorgeW writes:

PLEASE call your Congressman immediately.

dirtywhiteboy writes:

i hope she didn't take out the loan to pay off her hospital bill.

SpiritHawk writes:

This is so easy to fix in the future, all that has to be done is to require for a mortgage to be sold ALL parties MUST agree. This is so simple even a liberal could figure it out.

Kitty70 writes:

So kicking elderly people out of their homes is the new value in America. Well, I suppose the concept juxtaposes perfectly with giving everything to people who have never worked for anything, and evicting a long-time teacher and giver of the community into the streets. What has happened to this country?! What is wrong with the people directly responsible for this egregious act? I hope they never have another decent night's sleep.

FatElvisRecords writes:

Wilson & Associates, P.L.L.C.

http://www.wilson-assoc.com/home.aspx

Knoxville
9050 Executive Park Drive, Suite 115-C
Knoxville, TN 37923
Phone: (865) 558-5688
Fax: (865) 558-9078

moonpie-ellie writes:

in response to JustaguyinKtown:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

This has nothing to do with that. From what I understand, the mortgage assistance program is for people who are upside down and owe more than their house is worth. Sounds like this lady was scammed if they can't even track down the company who holds her mortgage.

ezspirit writes:

How tragic that this is happening to this family, & I wish I could help them. But, I'm afraid we're going to see more & more of this in the future with homeowners being taken advantage of by unscrupulous people in the "reverse mortgage" business. Don Dare on Channel 6 had a story about this (involving another lady) just a couple of weeks ago.

WXK46 writes:

in response to TheTime:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Now that you mention it, there does seem to be an agenda. The agenda thus far seems to be one where someone like this elderly woman makes one financial mistake, getting behind on a mortage taken out to pay for medical bills, and she loses everything.

On the other hand, JP Morgan makes a two billion dollar mistake, the CEO says "oops," a senior vice president takes an early golden parachute retirement, and everybody shrugs and moves on. That seems about right, doesn't it?

WorkingTaxpayer writes:

Something does not ring true. To evict someone there has to be court proceedings where both parties are on hand or have been notified in multiple ways over months of action. The person or bank foreclosing on the loan has to be present in the court or be represented by council. Who they are and where they are from is all open court record and can be found in the courthouse in about 10 minutes even if the loan has been sold. It is no secret.

If granny is not or was not competent to show up then the family has to first get a stay of the action at the court house, next they have to get her to sign a "power of attorney" form to handle her legal affairs. If she does not want to do this the court can deem her unfit to handle her affairs and appoint someone to do it. They then go to court and figure a way to settle up with the creditor and the judge. If she has a govt check this will not be that hard. Most banks don't want any more property any way and they will do about anything to not take property. I have seen some wait a year for someone to pay anything.

Having been through this sort of thing myself I hate to say it but if she is really that bad off she probably is not far from being incapable of safely staying at home alone by herself anyway much less caring for someone else.

The family needs to step up.

owkmann writes:

The MONSTERS! Evicting a little old lady for a few measly bucks. I don't care about the "legality" of this. It's just plain wrong!!

ezspirit writes:

in response to moonpie-ellie:

This has nothing to do with that. From what I understand, the mortgage assistance program is for people who are upside down and owe more than their house is worth. Sounds like this lady was scammed if they can't even track down the company who holds her mortgage.

I think JustaguyinKtown may be referring to "reverse mortgages", which is what I suspect this lady had taken out on her home several years ago - we're being bombarded with these type of ads on television every day.

ZZTOP writes:

As parents age it's important that they discuss big financial decisions with children or someone they trust. This poor lady probably had no clue what she was doing or what she actually signed. Makes me wonder what kind of repairs she had that would have cost so much on a thousand square foot house. This is so wrong.

bbholston#1398245 writes:

Unfortunately this is not too unusual. Many people who have applied for mortgagte assistance run into incompetent agencies who take months to help and then can't deliver on their promises. Many of these mortgages were sold over and over by companies that no longer exist. You cannot negotiate with Wilson and assoc.-they are only interested in selling your property-that is the way they make thier money. Some things you can do-file for chapter 13 bankruptcy, hire a good lawyer, demand that the mortgage company provide the proof that they have the original signed documents on the mortgage so that your attorney can study them. Too many mortgage companies don't even have the originals and by law they must have them before proceeding with the foreclosure. Most of all, fight for your rights and stay in your house. These forclosure people are scum and they make big money off of your misfortune. Many of my realtor friends have stopped selling foreclosures or accepting listings on foreclosures because it is such a dirty disgusting crooked business and they can live without it. Most of the realtors who do sell foreclosures are not to be trusted because they lie and misrepresent on a routine basis.

WXK46 writes:

in response to SpiritHawk:

This is so easy to fix in the future, all that has to be done is to require for a mortgage to be sold ALL parties MUST agree. This is so simple even a liberal could figure it out.

You're not wrong. At the heart of the banking fraud that preciptated the recent economic collapse was the practice where mortgage originators were able to make loans and quickly package them up and sell them down the line. This disconnect made it very easy for the lender to lie to borrowers to entice them into unsustainable loans. By the time the loans go bad, the original lender is cahsed out and long gone, ready to sell snake oil to their next mark. In the case of the bursting housing bubble of 2008, that means borrowers lose their homes, and the taxpayer is left holding the bag, bailing out the big banks who were holding all those loans as "toxic assets" on their balance sheets. The people who caused the problem make out ok, with everyone else left to pay for the mess.

Of course, fixing that problem will require new regulation that protects consumers and requires greater responsibility in the financial sector. Will anyone do that? I doubt it, though it's so simple even a conservative should be able to understand it.

WXK46 writes:

in response to WorkingTaxpayer:

Something does not ring true. To evict someone there has to be court proceedings where both parties are on hand or have been notified in multiple ways over months of action. The person or bank foreclosing on the loan has to be present in the court or be represented by council. Who they are and where they are from is all open court record and can be found in the courthouse in about 10 minutes even if the loan has been sold. It is no secret.

If granny is not or was not competent to show up then the family has to first get a stay of the action at the court house, next they have to get her to sign a "power of attorney" form to handle her legal affairs. If she does not want to do this the court can deem her unfit to handle her affairs and appoint someone to do it. They then go to court and figure a way to settle up with the creditor and the judge. If she has a govt check this will not be that hard. Most banks don't want any more property any way and they will do about anything to not take property. I have seen some wait a year for someone to pay anything.

Having been through this sort of thing myself I hate to say it but if she is really that bad off she probably is not far from being incapable of safely staying at home alone by herself anyway much less caring for someone else.

The family needs to step up.

You have clearly not been paying attention. Have you not heard of banks fraudulently "robo-signing" mortgage documents to hasten foeclosures, and pro-forma court proceedings that make a mockery of justice, but do crank the process along quickly? This woman and her family likely never had a chance to make things right.

owkmann writes:

Come on Knoxville! Wake up! How can we ignore such injustice?

volbob writes:

in response to WorkingTaxpayer:

Something does not ring true. To evict someone there has to be court proceedings where both parties are on hand or have been notified in multiple ways over months of action. The person or bank foreclosing on the loan has to be present in the court or be represented by council. Who they are and where they are from is all open court record and can be found in the courthouse in about 10 minutes even if the loan has been sold. It is no secret.

If granny is not or was not competent to show up then the family has to first get a stay of the action at the court house, next they have to get her to sign a "power of attorney" form to handle her legal affairs. If she does not want to do this the court can deem her unfit to handle her affairs and appoint someone to do it. They then go to court and figure a way to settle up with the creditor and the judge. If she has a govt check this will not be that hard. Most banks don't want any more property any way and they will do about anything to not take property. I have seen some wait a year for someone to pay anything.

Having been through this sort of thing myself I hate to say it but if she is really that bad off she probably is not far from being incapable of safely staying at home alone by herself anyway much less caring for someone else.

The family needs to step up.

You are absolutely right. Notification of is made by the lien holder that terms have not been met; filing of a substitute trustee's deed is made with the county clerk's office; formal foreclosure, usually at the courthouse steps, is made. A fairly simple deed search should turn up the current lien holder or, at a minimum, the substitute trustee. If the house has already been purchased at auction after formal foreclosure she is out of luck, though - there would already have been multiple public notices. Kinda sounds like this little lady tried to hide the issue and it got out of hand. Sad.

tnhiker (Inactive) writes:

It seems likely there is a big missing piece to this story which would explain more clearly the "how could this have happened?" question. Think about it people: Where did that $60,000 go and how did an aging grandmother with little or no experience in financial matters get hooked up with a mortgage company in the first place?

KNS appears to have left-out or failed to obtain information about this story that might have explained these issues.

bbholston#1398245 writes:

in response to TheTime:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

I suspect that Bain Capital is invloved in some way don't you.?

BayardDonahoo writes:

Local Mortgage Business Community, ----> You are really on trial here.

You are bound by duty and honor to do something about this terrible situation.

Period.

MickiJames writes:

in response to WorkingTaxpayer:

Something does not ring true. To evict someone there has to be court proceedings where both parties are on hand or have been notified in multiple ways over months of action. The person or bank foreclosing on the loan has to be present in the court or be represented by council. Who they are and where they are from is all open court record and can be found in the courthouse in about 10 minutes even if the loan has been sold. It is no secret.

If granny is not or was not competent to show up then the family has to first get a stay of the action at the court house, next they have to get her to sign a "power of attorney" form to handle her legal affairs. If she does not want to do this the court can deem her unfit to handle her affairs and appoint someone to do it. They then go to court and figure a way to settle up with the creditor and the judge. If she has a govt check this will not be that hard. Most banks don't want any more property any way and they will do about anything to not take property. I have seen some wait a year for someone to pay anything.

Having been through this sort of thing myself I hate to say it but if she is really that bad off she probably is not far from being incapable of safely staying at home alone by herself anyway much less caring for someone else.

The family needs to step up.

Not true at all! My Uncle had a notice of pending foreclosure and showed up to all his court proceedings (he lives on a farm) and NO ONE from the company that tried foreclosing showed up to the proceedings. They called a "local" attorney to represent them that did not know anything about the circumstances to meet with the judge. Needless to say, my uncle kept his farm, the judge ruled that the foreclosure was a fraud! So, do some research before posting!!

westknoxrepub writes:

The woman knowingly took out a loan, for repairs to the house, and she didn't pay it. What did she think was going to happen? How is this in any way underhanded or wrong? She borrowed the money, she didn't pay it back, it's pretty simple.

easygoings writes:

Sounds like a case for Don Dare

If it isn't too late for her to keep her home

There is people who would help if she is behind

Like to know more

Remember the young fellow sigmont on his grandmother I believe that was about to go into foreclosure and raised enough too pay off her morgage...

Helping this lady is the least anyone could do...

Tacamo01 writes:

in response to tnhiker:

It seems likely there is a big missing piece to this story which would explain more clearly the "how could this have happened?" question. Think about it people: Where did that $60,000 go and how did an aging grandmother with little or no experience in financial matters get hooked up with a mortgage company in the first place?

KNS appears to have left-out or failed to obtain information about this story that might have explained these issues.

Typical KNS reporting. The reason I subscribe to USA Today! First thing, why did she need 60K 5 years ago. Why not get all the info before reporting? Sad situation, maybe she should contact one of the local news stations that actually do some investigative work without being pressured to be politicaly correct WRT the good ole boys!

adhelper1 writes:

This is very sad but there are way too many unanswered questions. Why did she borrow so much money? And why was the disabled grandson not helping make the payments?? I'm sure he is drawing disability. Makes you wonder how much of that money went to lazy family members who promised to help but then did not. I've seen this happen in my own family. There are family members that prey on the elderly to get money and then don't pay them back leaving them to end up with no home. Oh and reporting such elderly abuse....yeah right!! Pray all works out for this sweet lady.

bebecerveza writes:

Wilson and Assoc. is a law firm that specializes in collections etc.. They love to take people to court and seem to be buying up all of the bad debt around this area.

What they should have done was filed for bankruptcy; you could than put a hold on the eviction proceedings. You would be allowed to keep your home, and 1 car. Contents may have to be sold to satisfy debts.

This may have bought them some time to figure out a payment option. Really sad situation.

sonofliberty writes:

in response to tnhiker:

It seems likely there is a big missing piece to this story which would explain more clearly the "how could this have happened?" question. Think about it people: Where did that $60,000 go and how did an aging grandmother with little or no experience in financial matters get hooked up with a mortgage company in the first place?

KNS appears to have left-out or failed to obtain information about this story that might have explained these issues.

I was thinking the same thing. Where is the $60K? What did it pay for? Why did she hide this from her daughter? KNS needs to do more investigative reporting, otherwise this is just a nice little boo-hoo-hoo fluff piece.

bbholston#1398245 writes:

in response to westknoxrepub:

The woman knowingly took out a loan, for repairs to the house, and she didn't pay it. What did she think was going to happen? How is this in any way underhanded or wrong? She borrowed the money, she didn't pay it back, it's pretty simple.

Of course,everything in your perfect West Knoxville world works just exactly right all the time. Sometimes events take place that render people and their families unable to handle a complex situation like this. But don't concern yourself because we all know that a westknoxrepublican lives in a perfect world where everything fits in the conservative scheme of things. I hope nothing like this ever happens to you or your family because you will feel real silly that you dared to be so pompous and arrogant about what has become an American tragedy thanks to corrupt lenders, fat cat banks, and speculators who would make a buck off of poor people like the lady in today's article.

FactoryGuy writes:

in response to dirtywhiteboy:

i hope she didn't take out the loan to pay off her hospital bill.

No, she probably took it out to buy a new Corvette.

What do you think she did with the money????

shoes writes:

This is one of the most shameful situations I can think of in a long time.

Some of you can debate party politics till the cows come home, both parties have been in power, but the basic truth is government regulation and enforcement failed this poor woman. Mortgage buying and selling largely mirrors the junk bonds buying and selling that led to the recession in the first place, and it's all being perpetrated by people "just following the rules" or more truthfully, the loopholes.

Somehow we have a situation with more and more laws, but without enforcement the crooks carry on exploiting the innocent with impunity. Truly shameful.

Red_Runner writes:

Try this next time you go to pay your mortgage. Ask to see the note. Of course they won't have it. Technically your bank should show you the note before you pay, because if they sell the note and you continue to pay your bank, it's basically your problem at least according to the law.

KTowner writes:

Oh, if only there were some sort of universal health care that could have made the cost of her surgery affordable...oh wait, that's about to be repealed before it can take effect. Never mind.

KTowner writes:

in response to FactoryGuy:

No, she probably took it out to buy a new Corvette.

What do you think she did with the money????

It would be odd to think she used it to pay off her hospital bill considering she took out the money three years before the surgery.

trinity62 writes:

This is sad, but it happens. Banks do not care about anyone when they want there money. Just like that reverse mortgage mess. It is ok if the person can keep the house up if not don't even think about it. The something happen to my 87yr mom and no one cared.

Braywolfpacker writes:

in response to WXK46:

You're not wrong. At the heart of the banking fraud that preciptated the recent economic collapse was the practice where mortgage originators were able to make loans and quickly package them up and sell them down the line. This disconnect made it very easy for the lender to lie to borrowers to entice them into unsustainable loans. By the time the loans go bad, the original lender is cahsed out and long gone, ready to sell snake oil to their next mark. In the case of the bursting housing bubble of 2008, that means borrowers lose their homes, and the taxpayer is left holding the bag, bailing out the big banks who were holding all those loans as "toxic assets" on their balance sheets. The people who caused the problem make out ok, with everyone else left to pay for the mess.

Of course, fixing that problem will require new regulation that protects consumers and requires greater responsibility in the financial sector. Will anyone do that? I doubt it, though it's so simple even a conservative should be able to understand it.

Yeah, it's not obvious to me why mortgages shouldn't be held 100% by the LOCAL lender who originates them. That way somebody with a vested interest in the community's well-being is involved. From what I remember, the big banks fought the proposal by Elizabeth Warren and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to make the loan originator keep 5% of the loan as "skin in the game". Does anyone know if it got killed altogether?

westknoxrepub writes:

in response to bbholston#1398245:

Of course,everything in your perfect West Knoxville world works just exactly right all the time. Sometimes events take place that render people and their families unable to handle a complex situation like this. But don't concern yourself because we all know that a westknoxrepublican lives in a perfect world where everything fits in the conservative scheme of things. I hope nothing like this ever happens to you or your family because you will feel real silly that you dared to be so pompous and arrogant about what has become an American tragedy thanks to corrupt lenders, fat cat banks, and speculators who would make a buck off of poor people like the lady in today's article.

This is what happens when people don't stick to logic, they get emotional and become irrational. She borrowed $60,000. . .she didn't pay it back. If she was worried about being in this situation she should have never borrowed the money.

westknoxrepub writes:

in response to BeauBo:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

It's not about compassion, it's about the fact she borrowed money and didn't pay it back. If I loaned someone $60,000 in good faith and they didn't pay it back, I'd sue, regardless of any particular situation. How is it immoral that she's being kicked out of the house, but not immoral that she hasn't paid back a loan?

banners writes:

in response to SpiritHawk:

This is so easy to fix in the future, all that has to be done is to require for a mortgage to be sold ALL parties MUST agree. This is so simple even a liberal could figure it out.

You can't do that. Lenders sell off the mortgages to the secondary mortgage market so they can lower their overall debt and lend money to more people. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are secondary mortgage buyers. Lenders have to maintain a certain asset to debt ratio; sell off the debts to secondary mortgage market, lender has more money to provide more mortgages.

It is a shame. Don't know what could be done now. I've known people to live in a foreclosed home for 2 years and more before finally being evicted. Lawyers can slow the process. Sounds like this lady needs somebody to look after her now anyway.

banners writes:

in response to westknoxrepub:

It's not about compassion, it's about the fact she borrowed money and didn't pay it back. If I loaned someone $60,000 in good faith and they didn't pay it back, I'd sue, regardless of any particular situation. How is it immoral that she's being kicked out of the house, but not immoral that she hasn't paid back a loan?

Didn't you read that her mortgage has been bounced around so much that the lady didn't know who to send her payments to? Did the company ever send somebody to talk to her before foreclosing? No, of course they didn't. Did this go through the courts? Is that required in TN?

westknoxrepub writes:

in response to banners:

Didn't you read that her mortgage has been bounced around so much that the lady didn't know who to send her payments to? Did the company ever send somebody to talk to her before foreclosing? No, of course they didn't. Did this go through the courts? Is that required in TN?

Did she every try to find out who the payments needed to be sent to or did she just stop making payments when they didn't come int he mail? She's the one who borrowed the money, you'd think she'd be responsible enough to avoid this situation.

poston24 writes:

Starting with Reagan, this country has elected theives (including Clinton with NAFTA) to bring us back to the robber baron days. How grand it is for the 1%.

valshaena writes:

in response to WorkingTaxpayer:

Something does not ring true. To evict someone there has to be court proceedings where both parties are on hand or have been notified in multiple ways over months of action. The person or bank foreclosing on the loan has to be present in the court or be represented by council. Who they are and where they are from is all open court record and can be found in the courthouse in about 10 minutes even if the loan has been sold. It is no secret.

If granny is not or was not competent to show up then the family has to first get a stay of the action at the court house, next they have to get her to sign a "power of attorney" form to handle her legal affairs. If she does not want to do this the court can deem her unfit to handle her affairs and appoint someone to do it. They then go to court and figure a way to settle up with the creditor and the judge. If she has a govt check this will not be that hard. Most banks don't want any more property any way and they will do about anything to not take property. I have seen some wait a year for someone to pay anything.

Having been through this sort of thing myself I hate to say it but if she is really that bad off she probably is not far from being incapable of safely staying at home alone by herself anyway much less caring for someone else.

The family needs to step up.

In recent meetings at the Knoxville Urban League we were told in the State of TN no court proceedings are required.

Frapples writes:

OK Mr. Reporter (Mike Blackerby) how about some investigation about this.
1. Who owns the mortgage?
2. What attorney is in charge of the foreclosure?
3. What type of notifications have been done?
4. When was the last true payment made?
5. What is the appraised value of the home?
So far this is a "feel bad story" rather than an investigative story. The information is not that hard to find.
Step up to the plate and get to work!

tnborn58 writes:

Frankly this situation is trashy. There is no other word to describe a situation like this. For a person, a senior citizen, to have this happen is outragous. This loan has apparently been floating like a piece of garbage on the sea and now some faceless, heartless, cold, calculating entity is forcing her out. It is not right. It is not fair and it is a perfect example of what is wrong with this country today. People no longer matter and for some, people are all just numbers or accounts or some other non emotional, non real thing.

The holder of the loan should be tracked down, like the dogs they are, and shown what they are doing and be suitable punished for their lack of humanity. No punishment would be too great for people like that. If they want to treat people inhumanly then they should get the same thing back in buckets. Greed is all this is. Another story of a greedy company that can profit from getting this property and selling it and making more money than this lady would probably ever see. Who cares if she and her family are homeless? Who cares about the morality of this issue? It is all about the money anymore.

kmh writes:

in response to banners:

Didn't you read that her mortgage has been bounced around so much that the lady didn't know who to send her payments to? Did the company ever send somebody to talk to her before foreclosing? No, of course they didn't. Did this go through the courts? Is that required in TN?

On both homes that I have owned, my mortgage was sold also - I was notified by a letter....they are not required to notify you in person. If she was handling everything on her own, it is possible that she overlooked the letter stating who the mortgage was sold to. This is a very sad situation. I feel bad for the woman, but it is the owners responsibility to contact their mortgage company if they have any problems - and there would be records of where the loan was sold to. When you sign a mortgage, most have a clause stating that the lender has the right to sell the loan. You sign it you are agreeing that this is acceptable. Someone of her age need someone to help her with her finances - especially when her daughter stated that she has noticed she was forgetful or whatnot. It is sad that the daughter is just now bring this to the media's attention - had they done this a month ago it would have given someone time to investigate and possible keep her from loosing her home.

valshaena writes:

in response to moonpie-ellie:

This has nothing to do with that. From what I understand, the mortgage assistance program is for people who are upside down and owe more than their house is worth. Sounds like this lady was scammed if they can't even track down the company who holds her mortgage.

There is mortgage assistance available for you no matter what kind of mortgage it is. The Knoxville Area Urban League has the details.

literate writes:

in response to WorkingTaxpayer:

Something does not ring true. To evict someone there has to be court proceedings where both parties are on hand or have been notified in multiple ways over months of action. The person or bank foreclosing on the loan has to be present in the court or be represented by council. Who they are and where they are from is all open court record and can be found in the courthouse in about 10 minutes even if the loan has been sold. It is no secret.

If granny is not or was not competent to show up then the family has to first get a stay of the action at the court house, next they have to get her to sign a "power of attorney" form to handle her legal affairs. If she does not want to do this the court can deem her unfit to handle her affairs and appoint someone to do it. They then go to court and figure a way to settle up with the creditor and the judge. If she has a govt check this will not be that hard. Most banks don't want any more property any way and they will do about anything to not take property. I have seen some wait a year for someone to pay anything.

Having been through this sort of thing myself I hate to say it but if she is really that bad off she probably is not far from being incapable of safely staying at home alone by herself anyway much less caring for someone else.

The family needs to step up.

You are mistaken. In TN, no judicial proceedings nor court hearing oversee a foreclosure.

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