Public responds to Strawberry Plains widow facing eviction; brief reprieve given on forced move

Mary Cate Jones smiles Wednesday, May. 16, 2012 as she tells of finding out that she has been given until Friday, June 15th to move out of the family home. 'It was just not going to be possible, ' she said. One of the main reasons for the extra time was for her grandchildren Bryce Jones, center, and Molly Cate Jones, right, to finish their testing and the school year. Jones, 78, has received notice that she will be evicted and the doors padlocked. (MICHAEL PATRICK/SENTINEL)

Photo by Michael Patrick, copyright © 2012

Mary Cate Jones smiles Wednesday, May. 16, 2012 as she tells of finding out that she has been given until Friday, June 15th to move out of the family home. "It was just not going to be possible, " she said. One of the main reasons for the extra time was for her grandchildren Bryce Jones, center, and Molly Cate Jones, right, to finish their testing and the school year. Jones, 78, has received notice that she will be evicted and the doors padlocked. (MICHAEL PATRICK/SENTINEL)

Kenny Jones talks about losing family home

STRAWBERRY PLAINS — Mary Cate Jones and her family are getting a brief reprieve from their planned eviction.

The family says they've been told they can stay in the house in which Jones, 78, has lived since 1956, until mid June. With the extension, Jones' grandchildren Bryce, 16, and Molly, 14, will be able to stay in the home and finish up the school year.

Still, after June 15 arrives, family members understand they will have to leave because Jones fell behind making mortgage payments.

Many people have called the News Sentinel and sent emails today wondering how they can help the widow and her family.

Carol White, Jones' daughter and a teacher at the Rush Strong School in Strawberry Plains, can be reached at 865-851-4321 or 865-933-5853.

White said today she learned from the lender that the eviction would be put off to June.

The family has been grateful for the public's support following publication of today's story about Jones' pending eviction from her Langston Road house.

Besides her grandchildren, Jones also has her son Kenny, who uses a wheelchair, living with her in the 1,000-square-foot home.

Jones and her late husband Kenneth built the house with their own hands.

According to White, she recently learned that her mother, who is in frail health, had taken out a $60,000 loan against the home in 2007. White said her mother, who had open-heart surgery three years ago, fell behind with the payments and the home went into foreclosure.

"I didn't know (about the loan) and had no idea this had taken place until a month ago Thursday," said White.

On Wednesday, Jones and White began packing up belongings to move out. It's been an emotional week for her, "pretty tough," she said.

"We built it (the house), and my daddy helped us some, too. It has just floored me. I've been a nervous wreck."

White said her parents were typical of the pay-as-you go generation and never had financial problems.

"Mother and Dad never even had a mortgage," explained White.

"They paid for the materials for the house as they built it, and got a lot of the wood for the house off Grandfather's farm.

"Mother was plenty capable and had always taken care of everything and everybody. Mother took out the mortgage against the home to make repairs — including a new roof."

White said her only option may be to take in her mother, brother and the two grandchildren if they cannot hang on to the house.

"It's the only thing I can do," said White.

"They'll move in with me, my husband and my younger brother. My problem is my brother Kenny had polio as a child, and I have steps all over my house.

"It's so sad when you look at Mom's age. She can't even talk about it."

More details as they develop online and in Friday's News Sentinel.

Get Copyright Permissions © 2012, Knoxville News Sentinel Co.
Want to use this article? Click here for options!

© 2012 Knoxville News Sentinel. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Discuss
  • Print

Related Stories

Comments » 85

Caneoverthere writes:

Thank you KNS and the Fifth Estate! The grubby moneychangers are NOT going to be happy about this one!

RespectYourElders writes:

Well, thank goodness. At least they have some time. She has people living with her, so she is not completely on her own. As her health and mental condition deteriorate, however, she should not be allowed to make any more financial decisions by herself. Her son or daughter need to be Power of Attorney for her.

Finally, she was 73-74 when she borrowed the $60,000. That was back before the collapse of everything, so the banks were eager to loan money to people whether they could afford it or not, and people of limited means were encouraged to go into debt. She should never have been allowed the loan in the first place. Not even considering the fact that open heart surgery at her age probably took its toll on her mental faculties, due to the anesthesia.

This is just sad, and I hope they can get things worked out so she doesn't loose her home.

HigherPower writes:

Who bought the property? Does she still have a right of redemption? I am willing to make a significant donation if it will help her remain in the home.

TennesseeMom writes:

in response to HigherPower:

Who bought the property? Does she still have a right of redemption? I am willing to make a significant donation if it will help her remain in the home.

Contact information for daughter, Carol is in the article. This is a wonderful family! Carol works 2 jobs to help her family - teaches school all day, then works at Cracker Barrel.

northj (staff) writes:

in response to welder7014:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

WELDER: See phone numbers at top of story.

chbradshaw writes:

I would like to know if there was a Mortgage Broker involved in this very inappropriate mortgage transaction. If there was, his Errors and Ommissions Insurance should be invoked to reverse this very inappropriate situation.

Also, did some hospital turn her medical bills over to a collection agency that hounded her into the mortgage? I bet that is exactly what happened.

trollhair writes:

It is sad that she is being evicted. BUT, this is what happens when YOU DON'T PAY YOUR BILLS. The daughter said they never had a mortgage until 2008. The woman is on Medicare. What warranted a $60,000 loan? A $60,000 mortgage for 15 years....the payments are approximately $450.00 a month. I am sure her social security and her sons SSI took care of that. I think there is more to this story than what was reported.

Bristol writes:

The mortgage company should be able to provide the loan pay off amount and the loan reinstatement fee. Maybe with donations she will be able to reinstate the loan and negotiate a lower monthly payment amount.

TN_Engineer writes:

I agree with the poster a few posts above - pay your bills! Don't suprise your kids and grandkids with the fact you can't pay back a $60,000 loan no one knew about and now you have to move out. I curious what she did with $60K without family knowing or noticing a difference? If this lady were 50 years old, this story wouldn't be news. I hope she finds a nice place, as I'm sure moving at her age is not an easy task. Good luck!

RespectYourElders writes:

in response to trollhair:

It is sad that she is being evicted. BUT, this is what happens when YOU DON'T PAY YOUR BILLS. The daughter said they never had a mortgage until 2008. The woman is on Medicare. What warranted a $60,000 loan? A $60,000 mortgage for 15 years....the payments are approximately $450.00 a month. I am sure her social security and her sons SSI took care of that. I think there is more to this story than what was reported.

Don't always go looking for conspiracy theories. This lady wanted to fix up her home back in 2007, so she took out a loan. Everywhere you turned back then, banks and mortgage companies were offering to loan money with little or no credit history. She believed what she was told, took out the loan, and she says she WAS sending checks. It's just possible that like my parents used to do, she had the address written down, and just kept sending her checks to the same place. Little did she know her health and mental condition would go downhill. But the bank or whoever loaned her the money certainly DID know that and were counting on it. She should never have been given the loan. Hopefully, you will not have difficulty keeping things straight when you're 78, but I wouldn't bet the farm on it.

Her Social Security and her son's SSI might have covered it, but I'm sure there were medical bills as well, and there are little things like groceries and utilities that have to be paid monthly, too.

The whole point is that this lady fell victim to the whole financial scheme being perpetrated back during that time. She should never have been given the loan in the first place.

Even the foreclosure specialist said she wouldn't do the foreclosure. That should tell you something.

Thank goodness someone at the lending institution has a heart (or an eye for bad publicity) and this woman and her family have a chance to save her home.

Tacamo01 writes:

in response to northj:

WELDER: See phone numbers at top of story.

Why not just help them out with setting up an account so deposits can be made! Then publish that info.

oakie99 writes:

There was a story recently about a grandmother facing eviction and her 12 year old grandson put up a website to help her and received enough donations to pay her debts. Something like that could be done for them.

slugdiamond (Inactive) writes:

Still no confirmation on who holds the mortgage? What happened to all the checks she kept writing? How about some "in-depth" reporting? Is this tied in to the larger mortgage scams that have been happening? Let's get some heads rolling people! Why is SHE evicted for $60,000 when billions are lost and no one gets punished?

lester_phinney#218848 writes:

in response to slugdiamond:

Still no confirmation on who holds the mortgage? What happened to all the checks she kept writing? How about some "in-depth" reporting? Is this tied in to the larger mortgage scams that have been happening? Let's get some heads rolling people! Why is SHE evicted for $60,000 when billions are lost and no one gets punished?

According to the Real Estate Assessment Data published by the State of Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury (www.assessment.state.tn.us), Jones’s home is owned by Federal National Mortgage Association in Dallas, TX. It records a sale date of 02/08/2011 for $63,096.

Caneoverthere writes:

in response to slugdiamond:

Still no confirmation on who holds the mortgage? What happened to all the checks she kept writing? How about some "in-depth" reporting? Is this tied in to the larger mortgage scams that have been happening? Let's get some heads rolling people! Why is SHE evicted for $60,000 when billions are lost and no one gets punished?

Perhaps because she was small enough to fail?

We don't need no stinking regulations!

andrews#1389072 writes:

This situation is deserving of public help. As someone suggested a durable power of attorney needs to be a part, but if ever there was a case that needs to remedied, this is it. As another person suggested this was during the time where banks were throwing money for loans and I bet there is an overt act buried somewhere in this mess.

tnbelle writes:

If I were her, I would NOT move out! I would get an attorney and make them produce the original note! They may not be able to produce it, and if not, I am quite certain they can't foreclose! TN is a non-judicial foreclosure state so they don't have to go to court to foreclose. But you can sue them and make them prove they have the actual note to your loan.

westknoxrepub writes:

$60,000 Loan for repairs on a 1000 square foot house? That seems a bit excessive, but it all boils down to the fact she didn't pay her bills, nor did she tell anyone else in the family she had taken out the loan. If what she says is true, then her credit history was such that the loan was more than likely made in good faith as her credit score was probably very favorable. She didn't tell anyone she took out the loan, then didn't keep up with where she was supposed to send her money. If anything, the lesson here is don't try to take on more than you can handle, and keep track of and pay your bills.

ztgn12#434983 writes:

I think a lawyer needs to step in and find out where everthing stands. What has been paid? What is past due? Who owns the loan? There are lots of unanswerd questions here.

homewrecker writes:

Here is a good solution..an investor purchase the property and lease it back to the lady until her death. Or purchase it and grant her a life estate and then the property would go to the investor/owner. Maybe even give the family an option to purchase the property and include a decent profit for the investor for stepping in..say 120% of purchase price etc. There can be a win-win situation if someone is willing to put up the money.

hannah writes:

in response to teaparty2012:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

I remember when my mother found out my grandmother had taken a mortgage and was about to lose her house…fortunately, my mother was in a position to help her but it could have gone a lot like this ladies situation. We couldn’t determine where all the money went then either…as best we could tell, my grandmother’s limited understanding, education, and gullibility allowed her to be duped out of most of it and the rest went to greedy people who over charged her for services and repairs. I’m willing to bet some of this ladies money went that way as well. Also, my elderly neighbor got behind when his wife had a heart attack. They believed they should pay their doctor bills and didn’t understand that help was available for that so they kept paying so she could get care. They got evicted from their home when they fell behind and I felt horrible for them. Fortunately, they were able to find another place to go.

People of that age don’t make the best decisions. It’s a fact. Another fact is she needs help. Bet none of you hard liners owe or have made questionable decisions. I owe a mint from helping my kids through school, taking care of my mom, helping sisters, etc…and by the grace of God I can pay. However – I hope someone would understand if I was much older, scared, confused, and had made a mistake. Just my humble opinion

nattybumpo writes:

in response to lester_phinney#218848:

According to the Real Estate Assessment Data published by the State of Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury (www.assessment.state.tn.us), Jones’s home is owned by Federal National Mortgage Association in Dallas, TX. It records a sale date of 02/08/2011 for $63,096.

``````````````````````````````

So assuming this is true and Fannie Mae is the mortgage holder, then it's our government that's throwing her out. Or as Caneoverthere would say, the "grubby moneychangers".

Remember everyone,.....................I'm from the government and I'm here to help you!

dmrichards1953 writes:

in response to westknoxrepub:

$60,000 Loan for repairs on a 1000 square foot house? That seems a bit excessive, but it all boils down to the fact she didn't pay her bills, nor did she tell anyone else in the family she had taken out the loan. If what she says is true, then her credit history was such that the loan was more than likely made in good faith as her credit score was probably very favorable. She didn't tell anyone she took out the loan, then didn't keep up with where she was supposed to send her money. If anything, the lesson here is don't try to take on more than you can handle, and keep track of and pay your bills.

Your vile and vicious posts leave me to hope you never face desperate financial times, or serious life events such as become disabled, or as all of us will become elderly.

No one is questioning that she owes the money for the mortgage, the issue is clearly one of confusion with where things stand. The constant re-selling of mortgages has got many folks very confused. There are also a number of very serious question that were not answered in this article. Many assumptions are being made that are not based on factual knowledge; assumptions by you and several other posters. Try something reasonable, such as waiting for FACTS to come to light.

There are numerous options that are possible, however each take some time to get into place. I present one question to you, are you (and those posting similar comments) part of the problem, or part of the solution? On its face you are part of the problem.

ztgn12#434983 writes:

in response to trollhair:

It is sad that she is being evicted. BUT, this is what happens when YOU DON'T PAY YOUR BILLS. The daughter said they never had a mortgage until 2008. The woman is on Medicare. What warranted a $60,000 loan? A $60,000 mortgage for 15 years....the payments are approximately $450.00 a month. I am sure her social security and her sons SSI took care of that. I think there is more to this story than what was reported.

You may be surprised how SMALL her ss check may be. As an example my late fater who was born in 1930 got a whopping $350/ month. Sometimes his electric bill would be over $100.00/month. Wonder how many people could make it on $350.0 a month with loans or rent to pay? Also her son it depends if he has always been drawing a disability check. if he started drawing at a young age then his cgheck is very small as he would not have had time to contribute much to social security.

RespectYourElders writes:

There's nothing sinister left out of the article. Obviously, unless people have been around people in their 70s, 80s, and 90s, they can't understand how a 70-something woman could get talked into a loan that was beyond her means back in the time when it was common practice to do this to anyone trying to get a loan/mortgage, not just elderly people. Millions of people also went into debt for houses they couldn't afford. It's all part of the same thing.

It's easy for people who have never been in this situation to sit back with 20/20 hindsight on what happened to the banks and mortgage companies and say she should have done this, or shouldn't have done that. She sounds like an honest, trusting person who was trying to fix up her home some. Maybe it was too much money, but I'm positive she had every intention of paying it back.

And, like I said, a lot of times older people rely on what they know. It sounds like she didn't realize her note was being sold and that her payment might need to go somewhere else. She'd never had a mortgage before; she was not aware of how loans get sold to other lenders.

It's so easy to sit here and judge someone who is up in years if you've never had to deal with it. That is why thieves are now targeting seniors in their phone scams. As a person ages, they are not always able to recognize the real thing from a scam. I just wish all you young'uns would put a little more thought into how you view your elders. It's not just black and white. People lose mental sharpness as they get into their golden years, and it will happen to you, too, some more so than others. That's the way the cycle of life works.

giboy40#1368041 writes:

Mike Raines here from United Capital Lending and co-host of Mortgage Matters on WNOX. I have researched the property data and it appears that the loan is held by the Federal National Mtg Association c/o Fannie Mae, I also ran a scenerio for Ms. Jones and it appears that she would qualify for a Reverse Mortgage with our company. I am currently working with a similiar situation out of Nashville, Tn. with senior citizen & her attorney in that her file was just approved by the appraiser to be cleared to move into underwriting. I am positive that with my resources that Mary & her family would benefit from my services that I can help with. So, please have the family contact my office at 865-934-1400 or 865-300-5846.

westknoxrepub writes:

in response to dmrichards1953:

Your vile and vicious posts leave me to hope you never face desperate financial times, or serious life events such as become disabled, or as all of us will become elderly.

No one is questioning that she owes the money for the mortgage, the issue is clearly one of confusion with where things stand. The constant re-selling of mortgages has got many folks very confused. There are also a number of very serious question that were not answered in this article. Many assumptions are being made that are not based on factual knowledge; assumptions by you and several other posters. Try something reasonable, such as waiting for FACTS to come to light.

There are numerous options that are possible, however each take some time to get into place. I present one question to you, are you (and those posting similar comments) part of the problem, or part of the solution? On its face you are part of the problem.

There's nothing vile about anything I've said. I'm going by the facts as they are presented. Equal protection under the rule of law should not take into account her age, her living situation, or her income. While her judgement due to her age may not be her fault, one cannot bend rules for that reason as it sets a dangerous prescedent. If she can pay off the loan through private charity then fine. Law is reason passion after all.

Caneoverthere writes:

in response to hannah:

I remember when my mother found out my grandmother had taken a mortgage and was about to lose her house…fortunately, my mother was in a position to help her but it could have gone a lot like this ladies situation. We couldn’t determine where all the money went then either…as best we could tell, my grandmother’s limited understanding, education, and gullibility allowed her to be duped out of most of it and the rest went to greedy people who over charged her for services and repairs. I’m willing to bet some of this ladies money went that way as well. Also, my elderly neighbor got behind when his wife had a heart attack. They believed they should pay their doctor bills and didn’t understand that help was available for that so they kept paying so she could get care. They got evicted from their home when they fell behind and I felt horrible for them. Fortunately, they were able to find another place to go.

People of that age don’t make the best decisions. It’s a fact. Another fact is she needs help. Bet none of you hard liners owe or have made questionable decisions. I owe a mint from helping my kids through school, taking care of my mom, helping sisters, etc…and by the grace of God I can pay. However – I hope someone would understand if I was much older, scared, confused, and had made a mistake. Just my humble opinion

I have to believe you will be rewarded for the way you have chosen to live your life and help others.

As for some of the other posters - what goes around tends to come around.

MerrieLong writes:

in response to westknoxrepub:

There's nothing vile about anything I've said. I'm going by the facts as they are presented. Equal protection under the rule of law should not take into account her age, her living situation, or her income. While her judgement due to her age may not be her fault, one cannot bend rules for that reason as it sets a dangerous prescedent. If she can pay off the loan through private charity then fine. Law is reason passion after all.

*vomits*

Yes, one CAN bend the rules. Yes, age, living situation, AND income SHOULD be taken into account. Her "judgement due to her age" most definitely should be taken into account. After all, as a civilized society, we don't put people to death for murder if they are mentally incompetent. We don't allow children to sign legal contracts.

While Ms. Jones is not a child, given her age, she quite possibly has impaired judgement.

Live it up in ya west knoxville house and keep looking down ya nose at the rest of us who weren't at blessed as you at all things financial, ya hard-nosed, hard...derrier.

BTW, "Law is reason passion after all", doesn't make any sense.

Caneoverthere writes:

in response to nattybumpo:

``````````````````````````````

So assuming this is true and Fannie Mae is the mortgage holder, then it's our government that's throwing her out. Or as Caneoverthere would say, the "grubby moneychangers".

Remember everyone,.....................I'm from the government and I'm here to help you!

Touche.

PS. just got back from the beach - turns out cardboard is also a great sunblock.

doglips_mcghee (Inactive) writes:

$60,000 to make the house accessible for someone with polio(not indicated how severe) seems fairly reasonable...ramps, remodeled bathrooms, elevator(?). Who knows...

Caneoverthere writes:

in response to MerrieLong:

*vomits*

Yes, one CAN bend the rules. Yes, age, living situation, AND income SHOULD be taken into account. Her "judgement due to her age" most definitely should be taken into account. After all, as a civilized society, we don't put people to death for murder if they are mentally incompetent. We don't allow children to sign legal contracts.

While Ms. Jones is not a child, given her age, she quite possibly has impaired judgement.

Live it up in ya west knoxville house and keep looking down ya nose at the rest of us who weren't at blessed as you at all things financial, ya hard-nosed, hard...derrier.

BTW, "Law is reason passion after all", doesn't make any sense.

Look at the good news - that sentence made no sense to you - I understood it perfectly; but then I have dyslexia LOL.

I am like the guy in the joke that walked into a bra.

westknoxrepub writes:

in response to MerrieLong:

*vomits*

Yes, one CAN bend the rules. Yes, age, living situation, AND income SHOULD be taken into account. Her "judgement due to her age" most definitely should be taken into account. After all, as a civilized society, we don't put people to death for murder if they are mentally incompetent. We don't allow children to sign legal contracts.

While Ms. Jones is not a child, given her age, she quite possibly has impaired judgement.

Live it up in ya west knoxville house and keep looking down ya nose at the rest of us who weren't at blessed as you at all things financial, ya hard-nosed, hard...derrier.

BTW, "Law is reason passion after all", doesn't make any sense.

Sorry, it's supposed to read Law is reason FREE FROM passion. No, you shouldn't bend the law because of special circumstances, because anyone and everyone can have special circumstances. That's the whole point of law, everyone's subject to it. She borrowed money, she didn't pay back the money, and by all accounts nothing illegal, even by the woman's own admission, occured. From the artcile SHE sought out the loan, SHE took out the money for a specific purpose, and SHE lost track of the payments. She seems more than willing to take responsibility for what occured, which is actually quite admirable, but those who let emotion stand in the way of logic are trying to place the blame elsewhere because it makes them somehow feel morally justified to be mad at the lender.

slugdiamond (Inactive) writes:

in response to lester_phinney#218848:

According to the Real Estate Assessment Data published by the State of Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury (www.assessment.state.tn.us), Jones’s home is owned by Federal National Mortgage Association in Dallas, TX. It records a sale date of 02/08/2011 for $63,096.

Thank you very much! It seems another organization was pointed out in an earlier article, wherein the posting of their site and the ranting and raving against them began. I don't think I'd go around insulting law firms without FIRM proof (not that I'm defending them).

Caneoverthere writes:

in response to Xaxeman:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

Yikes - what is DERP?

I am not even home to be able to saddle up one of our horses - based upon JP MORGAN Chase - looks like we are heading for another rodeo coming our way. LOL!

We don't need no stinking regulations.

WorkingTaxpayer writes:

Let me guess.

About 10 minutes after this story broke a reader went on line and found the person who the $60,000.00 is owed to. They contacted the borrowers kids and said something along the lines of "Granny hasn't paid anything in a year and a half. The bank is willing to work with you so she can keep her home. They just want to be paid back one way or the other. Would you like to take over the payments on the 60K?"

I am sure the kids came back with "How about 30 more days to move her out and we keep the $60K she spent the bank can have the house, it's probably not worth 40K anyway and they can eat the rest. We will move them in with us. We will get her retirement check and his disability check and all's well."

Sound about right?

chs1965 writes:

in response to trollhair:

It is sad that she is being evicted. BUT, this is what happens when YOU DON'T PAY YOUR BILLS. The daughter said they never had a mortgage until 2008. The woman is on Medicare. What warranted a $60,000 loan? A $60,000 mortgage for 15 years....the payments are approximately $450.00 a month. I am sure her social security and her sons SSI took care of that. I think there is more to this story than what was reported.

I know a good preacher who would be happy to marry your mother and father.

Caneoverthere writes:

in response to WorkingTaxpayer:

Let me guess.

About 10 minutes after this story broke a reader went on line and found the person who the $60,000.00 is owed to. They contacted the borrowers kids and said something along the lines of "Granny hasn't paid anything in a year and a half. The bank is willing to work with you so she can keep her home. They just want to be paid back one way or the other. Would you like to take over the payments on the 60K?"

I am sure the kids came back with "How about 30 more days to move her out and we keep the $60K she spent the bank can have the house, it's probably not worth 40K anyway and they can eat the rest. We will move them in with us. We will get her retirement check and his disability check and all's well."

Sound about right?

It may, in fact, sound right - to anyone who might be inclined to whine constantly / endlessly.

WorkingTaxpayer writes:

in response to WorkingTaxpayer:

Let me guess.

About 10 minutes after this story broke a reader went on line and found the person who the $60,000.00 is owed to. They contacted the borrowers kids and said something along the lines of "Granny hasn't paid anything in a year and a half. The bank is willing to work with you so she can keep her home. They just want to be paid back one way or the other. Would you like to take over the payments on the 60K?"

I am sure the kids came back with "How about 30 more days to move her out and we keep the $60K she spent the bank can have the house, it's probably not worth 40K anyway and they can eat the rest. We will move them in with us. We will get her retirement check and his disability check and all's well."

Sound about right?

It's not a new story. Some version of that is happening all over the nation. People borrowed against a house that is upside down now and no one wants to be held to pay what they agreed to pay. That is why banks that didn't get a bail out are going bust left and right.

WorkingTaxpayer writes:

To say she should be allowed to get out of the loan you have to accept that banks should get bail outs. You cant have one without the other.

TnDan writes:

It's a tragedy when anyone loses their home, regardless of age.

Why are so many assuming this woman had impaired judgement at the time she took out the loan, and somehow a victim of predatory lending? Just because she's old? Do you assume all old people are mentally impaired? Her daughter states, in the original article, that only recently she has noticed her mother has become forgetful. My grandmother was very frail when she died in her 90s, but her mentality was sharp as a tack.

RespectYourElders writes:

in response to westknoxrepub:

Sorry, it's supposed to read Law is reason FREE FROM passion. No, you shouldn't bend the law because of special circumstances, because anyone and everyone can have special circumstances. That's the whole point of law, everyone's subject to it. She borrowed money, she didn't pay back the money, and by all accounts nothing illegal, even by the woman's own admission, occured. From the artcile SHE sought out the loan, SHE took out the money for a specific purpose, and SHE lost track of the payments. She seems more than willing to take responsibility for what occured, which is actually quite admirable, but those who let emotion stand in the way of logic are trying to place the blame elsewhere because it makes them somehow feel morally justified to be mad at the lender.

It would be amusing to be around when you get old, and have diminished capabilities. I won't be around, but I hope you get over this 30-something feeling of intellectual superiority by that time. You just can't seem to understand now that you will not be as sharp as you think you are right now when you are this lady's age. Ever hear of Alzheimer's? It is no respector of persons, or age, for that matter. Every single person on this planet who lives long enough will be at risk for some form of dementia. No one said what was done in loaning her the money was illegal at the time, but it was morally wrong.

MerrieLong and caneoverthere have the best posts on here. They get it.

"Bending the law"? Everyone is not subject to the same interpretation of the law. Contracts cannot be made with minors, and people have been judged not guilty by reason of insanity, even in murder cases. Others of a higher social calling are given judicial diversion. The laws are bent every single day.

TNRiverCaptain writes:

in response to westknoxrepub:

$60,000 Loan for repairs on a 1000 square foot house? That seems a bit excessive, but it all boils down to the fact she didn't pay her bills, nor did she tell anyone else in the family she had taken out the loan. If what she says is true, then her credit history was such that the loan was more than likely made in good faith as her credit score was probably very favorable. She didn't tell anyone she took out the loan, then didn't keep up with where she was supposed to send her money. If anything, the lesson here is don't try to take on more than you can handle, and keep track of and pay your bills.

Lets hope we are still feeling generous when you start to slip mentally and lose your balance on life as this lady has.

The lesson here is learning how to understand what you are reading and reading between the lines of what is reported and what should not have to be said for what the underlining issue is.

TN_Engineer writes:

At the time the loan was made, she was 73...that's not that old. Everyone is talking about how elderly she is, but honestly 73 isn't the same as 83 or 93. With no SS by the time I want to be retired, I'll still be working full time at 73 in order to have enough money saved up to retire with no other assistance.

Esau writes:

in response to teaparty2012:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

We all should step up and give what we can to get Ms. Jones back on firm footing. Also for once I agree with teaparty2012, to avoid future dire straits the daughter or someone need to step up and help manage her finances.

MerrieLong writes:

in response to TnDan:

It's a tragedy when anyone loses their home, regardless of age.

Why are so many assuming this woman had impaired judgement at the time she took out the loan, and somehow a victim of predatory lending? Just because she's old? Do you assume all old people are mentally impaired? Her daughter states, in the original article, that only recently she has noticed her mother has become forgetful. My grandmother was very frail when she died in her 90s, but her mentality was sharp as a tack.

That's great that your grandma never lost her mental facilities. Not everyone is as fortunate. Heck, our own Pat Summit was 58 when she was diagnosed with Alzheimer's.

No, not every elderly person is mentally impaired, but with every year, we are that much closer. This lady's 78, and it's quite possible that she does have some impairment. She might not have been when she took out the loan, but she very well might now.

Did she think she had paid her mortgage or like someone else had suggested, did she continue to send a check to the wrong address?

I'm not advocating that the bank just tear up her paperwork and let her keep the house, but I do think that now that it has been brought to the attention of her family, the lender could give her an extension (and it appears that they have) until her family can get her back on track.

The payments, probably, are not that big and once she gets caught up and someone takes over the responsibility of her finances, hopefully, she'll get her house paid back off.

I do wish that they had dug deeper for this story. Like many have stated, it leaves a lot of unanswered questions.

Esau writes:

in response to TNRiverCaptain:

Lets hope we are still feeling generous when you start to slip mentally and lose your balance on life as this lady has.

The lesson here is learning how to understand what you are reading and reading between the lines of what is reported and what should not have to be said for what the underlining issue is.

There is a song by Everlast "What It's Like" westknoxrepub might give it a listen.

westknoxrepub writes:

in response to BeauBo:

(This comment was removed by the site staff.)

There's nothing bitter about it. You people are attacking the lenders, the banks, and whoever else isn't the home owner because it makes you feel better about yourselves. The bank loaned her the money, probably not in a predatory fashion since it wasn't a loan to purchase a home, but for repairs, and she didn't pay it back. It's not the banks fault she didn't pay her bills, they're abiding by the contract she entered into agreement to, it's really not that complicated.

TNRiverCaptain writes:

in response to westknoxrepub:

There's nothing bitter about it. You people are attacking the lenders, the banks, and whoever else isn't the home owner because it makes you feel better about yourselves. The bank loaned her the money, probably not in a predatory fashion since it wasn't a loan to purchase a home, but for repairs, and she didn't pay it back. It's not the banks fault she didn't pay her bills, they're abiding by the contract she entered into agreement to, it's really not that complicated.

You really should consider being a Democrate... you have acting like their mascot done pat.

Redbird writes:

Enough bashing already, is there anything we can do to help? I will throw in some money and if everyone else does the same, we can help her buy her house back. Let's not think about how it will benefit us Karma always comes around. We may be in need someday.

Want to participate in the conversation? Become a subscriber today. Subscribers can read and comment on any story, anytime. Non-subscribers will only be able to view comments on select stories.

Features