Favorite photo of the week

Steve Boyce, owner of Rush's Music plays the euphonium in celebration of the opening of Henley Bridge on Thursday, October 17, 2013. (SAUL YOUNG/NEWS SENTINEL)

Steve Boyce, owner of Rush’s Music plays the euphonium in celebration of the opening of Henley Bridge on Thursday, October 17, 2013. (SAUL YOUNG/NEWS SENTINEL)

Because every bridge opening needs an euphonium player.

The euphonium[1] is a conical-bore, baritone-voiced brass instrument.  The euphonium derives its name from the Greek word euphonos,[1] meaning “well-sounding” or “sweet-voiced” (eu means “well” or “good” and phonos means “of sound”, so “of good sound”). The euphonium is a valved instrument; nearly all current models are piston valved, though rotary valved models do exist.  A person who plays the euphonium is sometimes called a euphoniumist, euphophonist, or a euphonist, while British players often colloquially refer to themselves as euphists, or euphologists. Similarly, the instrument itself is often referred to as eupho or euph.

Wikipedia