Monthly Archives: October 2013

Pugh joins NC State Hall of Fame

foodClaud Pugh, a retired nuclear program manager at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will be inducted into North Carolina State University’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Hall of Fame on Friday.

While at ORNL, Pugh was director of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission program office. He also was head of the Engineering Technology Division’s pressure vessel technology section and served in a number of other research and management positions on projects sponsored by the NRC and the Department of Energy. According to information provided by ORNL, Pugh also served (from 1987-2009) as the U.S. representative on the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants.

 

Bill Reis to head Y-12’s public, governmental affairs

reisBill Reis has been appointed to yet-another management role at the Y-12 nuclear weapons plant, this time as B&W Y-12’s vice president for public and governmental affairs. For the past two years, Reis served as VP for environment, safety and health. Before that, he was vice president of program management, overseeing Y-12′s core missions. Reis has worked at Y-12 for more than 30 years.

According to information released today by B&W Y-12, Reis is replacing Jud Simmons, who had been serving as the contractor’s acting director for public and governmental affairs. Simmons is returning to his corporate position at Babcock & Wilcox.

Yvonne Bishop, who had been serving as senior director and deputy manager for ES&H, will assume the vice president for ES&H on an acting basis.

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Trench 13: a down-and-dirty project awaits

trench13There have been a lot of strange moments in the Department of Energy’s cleanup of nasty, nasty wastes in Oak Ridge, and Trench 13 is memorable in that regard. On Aug. 8, 2005, when workers tapped into that part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s atomic burial grounds, flames of fire shot up into the air, and — well — that wasn’t a good sign. Obviously.

It was a nightmare, and that little corner of DOE’s Oak Ridge cleanup has been put on hold ever since.

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IG: kudos for Savannah River, not so much for LANL, Bonneville

The Department of Energy’s Inspector General today released an audit report on the sustainability initiatives with the DOE fleet of vehicles (more than 14,000 in total), taking a look at three sites — Savannah River, Los Alamos and the Bonneville Power Administration. The audit found issues at the latter two sites, but Savannah River got a positive review.

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B61, safety and security, and future strategies

In advance of today’s hearing on the B61 life-extension program, etc., at the House Armed Services subcommittee on strategic forces, Stephen Young of the Union of Concerned Scientists posted some interesting analysis on the UCS blog All Things Nuclear. Of particular note is the amount of highly enriched uranium in various models of the B61 and how that plays into the security analyses.

Meanwhile, here is today’s prepared statement by Dr. Don Cook, the NNSA’s deputy administrator for defense programs.

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UCOR, too

Allen Schubert, communications director at URS-CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR), the
Department of Energy’s cleanup manager in Oak Ridge, confirmed this afternoon that some of the contractor’s employees were affected by the cyber theft at DOE. However, Schubert said he did not have any information on the number of workers impacted by the incident.

More on Oak Ridge cyber impacts

The Oak Ridge impacts of the cyber attack at the Department of Energy appear to be pretty broad, although all the details have yet to emerge.

Claire Sinclair, a spokeswoman in DOE’s site office at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, said today all of the 40 federal employees in the site office had their personal information compromised by the July attack. Sinclair said some employees at UT-Battelle, DOE’s managing contractor at ORNL, also were affected, but she said she did not know how many.

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